Prescott Paraclete, July 13, 1855

Prescott Paraclete

July 13, 1855

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Issue date: Friday, July 13, 1855

Pages available: 4

Previous edition: Friday, July 6, 1855

Next edition: Friday, July 20, 1855

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Publication name: Prescott Paraclete

Location: Prescott, Wisconsin

Pages available: 125

Years available: 1855 - 1855

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Prescott Paraclete, The (Newspaper) - July 13, 1855, Prescott, Wisconsin vmmm i CHARLES E. YOUNG, VOL. I. Enterprise, Education arid PRESCOTT, PIERCE COUNTY, l Elemertts of Civilization EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR 1855. paraclete, Kinnicfcinnic Oards. r.vf.tiv AT K.S ..I ill n'l' V.'M.I ll.u I'i.-i iu i I, L A LOTS 77-; A' :Y K 1'll.i.iV.lil. 'I'liifi ciiiinniutliius Public HniDse i'd mi i-lii; I'linu'r i'l' Trout nnd streets l.'.v uiuild known landlord. .lowrlry, MIIMO, y. douo in uiMc! Xu. 1UO I) O W. Ti'i'.Vl-iV AN IH'OrXHV.Ll.OH A'I1 LAW, Minnrtola '1'trritoyy, ATTKNIl tliiifVuuts in Hakntii, Cuutitii-s in Minnusutu. nnd IT t.'i-urty NVi.-.-oii-in. Will alsu iitti'iid Iriuls lit llin urb I--K nv A. (liusMAN. St. 1'iHil, Mill.'fur. u. II, .Mviululn, Aliii. TIT. .M'llliA r.-q. I'.ic.'IM.-I-, lu'il WHIR I Their bsjanty and sweetness Sometiiries beneatli his pitiless Hope's fidrcat, pure .blossoms he crushed, Though the music is sllll'd, the e'ciip will linger Vt'l.on (lie sound of OUR harp-sti-iiijrs ia hushed. A REVSR1E. Far from tile busy -world and bustling 'crowd; from the vain, Ihc- wealthy nnd tlk'-prouJ; Fnr from tho iiiidnight dimoo arid ftiolisli plav; J-'iir iViiuitbo thuughtlcss, gidd.v and the guy i'ui1 t'ruui tliu flutterer, whose brcuUi would tniji1 Tim virtues ol'.tlie purest siiint Fur from nil these, and tVora :ill utlier Tu ponce mill swuct i-opuse, Tdlivc remote., IHU-wisii to hour or sec, Their sportive cnrrols uv their fcsl.i'ni ?jut ilia huiiiblo, calm, aliadi1, Aly littlu farm and friendship should- be laid. A liitle dwelling, buaulil'ul and neat, Should be erected near a oouuLr.v snut, many abodes and walks encompass'J.round' Heinlucli and piun and-nmple sliculd be fuuncl, Variety uf flowers and other shades Which grow profurcly in thenei Should be transplRnted round m Where ponce nnd'hnruiony sljou' A husband, whose mast exemplary life Should-kuuh tho tcmguc of seandu.1 nud of strife Whoso nil his actions should control; liU temper hid soul: His aspect mild as when thu opening clay Kuch shade dispels and Kelts each cloud away THO law uf Oud his soul's supreme delight, (The only luw that can tliicot His heart awake to sorrow's softest oull, And llcnvi'u'd own-love, cementing, drowning all! To him as to a father I'd submit, This only bondage would indeed be i public: "but-fraud [hold.] proud Ihe says, ''T' wadiia niffer Tcxcharifol- i r. t _ O .1 [fame I" i toot. Napoleon was vain of his small Salvutor was heard to compare Dr. Johnson had a voracious liking I Gibbon was a lazy man. or a leg of mutton. "At nw Aunt! was content to si which the old slo- o9" the trees pockets is related. for Ford' s said. sit from morn- 'I' a to so- much leg that she A gentleman once treated him toj wished to be always lying on sofas, read- si dish of new honey und clouted cream.! ing. eternal new novels of Crebillon and to so much of aj ing till night threading the dreamy ma- used to talk ofj zes of his own mind. Grnv said that Lc himself with Raphael and Michael An- of which lie partook so enormously, that! Marivaux. Fen ton the eminent scholar, calling the foroier dry, and the lat- his entertainer was alarmed. died from sheer inactivity :xl: coarse1.- and Haphaei: airain, was I jealous of the fame and skill of Michael Angclo. Hogarth's historical paintings the famous actor, has been known to travel from Lohtlon to Bath. he rose late, and when he had risen, sat down to his books and papers. A woman who wait- which were in his own 1 Dory. opinion, those of the old masters: for the mere sake of dining upon a John! ed upon him iu his logings said, that "he j would lie a-bed and be fed with a. Dr. Parr, in a private letter, confesses: Contrary examples U> that of Sir Walter his passionate love of hot boiled lob-1 Scott, who wro schievoua wit, resolving sters, with a profusion of shrimp sauce.! fore breakfast! nt of flattery be would j Shelly was for many years a vegeta-j To return t Sir Peter vanity w-is so well to his passionate love of hot boiled lob- J Scott, who wrote all his finest works be- that a to try what amour believe, told him one day thnt if the An- rian. In his'notes to his earliest edition; bra-tec tiler of Mankind could the ben- 1 of Qxccn Mub, speaks with cntliusias to the recreations ofcele- persons. Oliver Cromwell is said to have sometimes east aside his pu- efit of his (Lsiy's) opinion upon beauty, j of dinner of "greens, potatoes and tur- ritan gravity, sind played at bliiidman's we: should all have been materially bene- 1 nips." ylri fitted in point of personal appearance to which the painter emphatically re- plied PorcGott. sare. I believe vou're JBojardo, the Italian poet, ascribed so high an importance to his poetry, that Iriosto was excessively fond ofj buff with his daughter and attendants. turnips. He ate fust, arid of whatever, Henri Quatre delighted to go about in was nearest him, ..often beginning with; disguise among the peasantry. Charles the bread upon the table before the other II 's most innocent amusement consisted dishes came. Being vistted one day by in feeding tbe ducks in St. James' Park, a stranger, ho devoured all the dinner and in rearing numbers of those beauti- thtit was provided for both: and when ful spaiincls that still bear his name. 'iug. j when he had invented a suitable name j afterwards censured for his impoliteness. I Beotheven would splash in cold water at f little celt dwtii. for one of his heroes, he set the bells'only observed that "the gentleman should j all times of the day ringing in the village. have taken care of was swamped, and Handel ate enormously; and Dr.' through the tioorin KoSebue was so vain and that he could endure nothing celebrated j to be near him, though it were but a pic- j tare or a and :evcu Lamartine, the loftiest and finest of French poets, j robs his charming pages of half their j beauty by the inordinate self-praise of 1 his commentaries.' Rousseau has been called "the self- torturing and Lord Byron's till his chamber the water oozed Kitchener relates of him, that whenever neath; he would also walkout in tho he dined at a. tavern, he ordered dinner, dewy fields at night or morning without for three. On being told that all shoes or stockings. ready as soon as the company should ar- Shelley took -An unaccountable delight rive, he would exclaim de dinner ''Den pring up in floating little paper boats on any piece AM DE GOM-! of water he chanced to be near. There Lord Byron's favorite dish was eggs and bacon and thouh lie could never is a pond on Ilampstetu.l-hcath which has often borne his tinny Hoots and there is au anecdote. related of While our fwoctj.iy should be, in fen-em pru.vi-r was one Jong piece of egotism from eat it 'without suffering from an attack of! too good, wo fear, to be crij_ He was vain of his indigestion, he had not always sufficient' says, that being one day beside the Ser- Tu yield ourselves to the patcrual.rair.cv Oflliiu, to whiiiii both belong; that iu Mis guardianship we vni-ht be aul'o from sin; Our spirits moulded, miU coiifirru'd cur choice 01' Virtues pure, u.nd overlasliiigjtij-s Then when our pilgrimage on onrili 'shall end. V u may Uigotlior lie prepared to spcm! A blessed Eternity, with Gail Anil swull the anthems nf Radeoniing Love. beginning to i genius, his rank., his misanthropy, and firmness lo resist the temptation. Lal- even of vices and he was particu- j Jarly proud of his good riding .ami his handsome hands. xjntine, and having no other paper in ande. the great French astronomer, j his pocket wherewith to indulge his pas- wotild eat spideis as a relish. Linnaeus sion for ship-building, he actually fol- elighted in chocolate; and it was he dcd a bank-bill for fifty into the From 1111 rpu i- 's niu-gnziri Weak Points of Great Mans It is.sometimes instructive, and at all ito times .interesting, vo learn something of! Attilius Regains, at the time Penuriousness, unhappily, lias-been i who bestowed upon-it its gencricu desired shape launched little craft too commonly, associated with, of, or "food of the upon its voyage watched its steady pro- i and Onto, tho censor, on his re- i deemed strawberries the most gress with paternal anxiety and, final- turn i'ron'i Spain, was so parsimonious j delicious eating 'in tho world; and dti- j ly, went over and received it in safety I that he sold his field-horse, to save tho i ring his last illness', used to exclaim con- j at the opposite side. I expense, of convoying the animal .by sea j stnni ly "If I can but reach the season j of striwberrk-a The Printer's Ten Commandmotits. of ,U. O. HA ATf'.M'.M-'.V? AT LAW, _ the eccentricities, failings, and foibfes of i greafC3t in Africa, entreated mission to return home to the ir itri'i: ill .11! t" tiicir onri1, in the con mid l-'dlmnt'i.'. in Miniii'. W t" all ontrnsloU i tu, mid in County liAXKl.NVt KXl'IIANCit-; IAITICK, Ultrlncn, S7. CVoi.fOc. buy unit M'll on the .South anil nut pHti money M II.I. i i.'i.. AT i'i rurity at oiirri'f.L interest 1 :uul ,-i-H Anu'rinin UuUI PHI lii-iilur tu eulbcticns, r.iiy- remarkablp persons. Such traits form the most attractive and salient points ofj merit 0'''' j biographical works they may be ca.lled i scvcn the coloring of literary portraiture, and i Defraud in being endowed j ty, sire found to j memory of the general readcT. gathered together a number j of these personal anecdotes, we propose to pass away a gossiping and not wholly ;an unprofiruble" half liour iu -relating them to.our-renders. his per- m-ana 2-e- The amusements of remarkable pcr- 1 soris have.been varioua. and often eccen- tric. The si eat IJavle would cstsite, which consisted of! wrap himself in his cloak, and hasten to I 1. Thou shalt- love the Printer for ha is the standard of thy country. 2. Thou shalt subscribe for his pa- per, for he laboreth hard to obtain news him of certain aim- i this was his chief rekixutiou from the in- -g that his servants places where mountebanks resorted and whiclrye may not remain ignorant. 0. Thou shaft pay him for his paper, for he laboreth much to give you the news in due season. 4. Thou shalt advertise that he may uscj to be aMc to give you the paper. niiuJ. j seek {tmusement in violent exorcise, and Thou sbalt not Among artists, Noilekens nnd Noilh- j was found, by De Gramrnuiit jumpin wilh :m individual vitnli-j implements, and that he -was study. -.Spinoza delighted to o linger lont'cst in the to after his affairs. Lord j set spiders fighting, arid would liiuyh irn- Bacon is a melancholy instance of .the moderately at dominion obtained by avarice over a warfare.; Cardinal beholding their Richelieu insect eotLMvere proverbially penurious. Sivifc with his servant, .to sec which could leap s. liso.v, J. IIK.NM.Mi. N. iin sifiA? .1 VAT ;.v, .w. D. SI'IUJKON. WISCONSIN i.. u-.- in I'-i.-l with 'hi- .i.-linv HUOT._ '.niid :it lii? mill gi.nl sti.ek ut'ull .-oiu d nnd gvern _ lunibi-i- will givu to all who wivrU it. Mrehjiivics inul will cotiMilt their iiitctcit by their nt mill. uvi1, t'ik-rcc IV., WU. DAG I GALERY. __......_. his old age was r.Varicious, and hud an j the highest. It is painful to reflect upon the inordi-' terror of visitors. his Tbe great .logician, Samuel Clarke, nate vanity which ttlmrn'eteriyses-miiny il- j friends of either sex came to him, in ex- fund of such salatory inter- v i pectation of a dinner, his custom was to to his hours of-meditation, and give every one a shilling, thnt they j has been, discovered leaping over tables might please theitiAeK-es'with their' pro- j and- chairs. observing the ap- Of the great Duke of Marl-1 proach of .-a pedant, he; said: ".Now we ilustrious bald, he lives. When became constantly wore tbe laurel- wreath with whieli we see him represen- ted on on medals, in the hope of conceal- ing the defect; and Cicero's egotism was j so that he even composed a Latin 1 hexameter in his own I Oh, fortuimtam nnUun me Consule Eoroan. I (Oh fortunate Koruc when I was torn Icss of his office rules, visit, liim Icgard- derangng hia borough, it alloy of the most sordid .We-' will now turn to the errors h, it is said by Macauley, that j must for u fool is coming in lendid qualities were mingled with i The learned PeUvius used to twirl his j chair round anil round for five minutes., of jat the end of every two hours. Tycho v; .'M WAV; orwc. i liitl I'ir 1 ui-. l'i -.it tliis II. STON K, 'It if tiff a T1IK in the West. 1'wms in the Fulls. Views nf uttr.uMivc iMinncsbta nuvi Indiiin t'ut tmto, und tiil.on in the Le.-t stvlo i.f !ho Ait In- T. Artist. illurs, il Or-: with 4. A'L'TdllNEY AT And General Land Agent .SV. Croir Co., line the just sarcasm of on Juvenal. Queen Elizabeth lefc. three tlioiisand diflb she self indulgence. Socrates, Plato, Agath- Erahe diverted himself with polishing Aristophanes, and others of the glasses for spectacles. most celebretcd'O-reeks. drank wine to ;i surprising and Plato says, in 'Puley, the author of. Natural 1'kcol- was-so much given to angling, that :diflbrent dresses in her wardrobo; wheh'l it .Socrates kept so- j he. had his portrait with a rod and line 'shedied: aud during .many years Tiberius was so in his hand. Louis XVI., of sad mem- pope G. Thou sluilt not touch anything that will give the printer trouble, that he rriny not Isold thee guilty. 7. Thou shalt not read the manu- script in the hands of the compositor, for he will not hold the blameless. 8. Thau ghalt ask of him but few questions in the from it thou shalt tell nothing. 9. Thou shalt not seek the news be- fore it is printed, for he will give it to thec in- due season. 0. Thou shalt not send threatening and abusive letters to the editor. latter part of her life, would" not Suffer addicted to this vice, that lie had i amused himself with I u looking-glass in her presence, for fear j frequently to be carried from the senate-1 Salvator Rosa used to peif jrm in extem- that she'should' perceive the ravages of house. :Cato was fond of the j pore take the .character-of Jouson delighted in copious dmighta a mountebank in the streets of Home. Ko. 19, North Cl.it k St., Chicago, HI. j 11 prii-c.-, anc; f t, durnt-tUly uiui c.tteritir EXCHANGE, BANKING AND COMMISSION OFFICE OF U. Wis., Will give attention lo wllcciKms in South eru ami Xorthcrn llliuuis; will mittanot

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