Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Prairie Du Chien Leader: Saturday, January 9, 1858 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Prairie Du Chien Leader (Newspaper) - January 9, 1858, Prairie Du Chien, Wisconsin                             VOLUME I. PRAIRIE DU CHIEN, CRAWFORD, CO., SATURDAY, JANUARY NUMBER 26 'Imtirieiui Cfjint -grafter QUKER STORIES ABOUT CHICKENS HILL GHKENK, moi'iut-rous lu Ho well Block, THK DKrOT Or THC M. >t. K.ULHOAD, TIJK LAIIGKST 1'Al'KK IX THK STATE WEST OF 1'IIE CAl'ITAL. Tm tvAucN li imbltshed every Saturtlny, at the fol- I'.! 00. 1 CMy BuiMcrlbcrs, dcllrtmt, one year, To Ofllcc ami Mull Hubscrlbvrii, ftubfcrllHrrd u purlod of tlmo will bv utmrgcd lu MJIIU uroiMirtluiii OF ADVERTISING: 3 I M 1 30 1 IS A A TM 1 f lhi, iun, u r t ii CM-fourth cf ft f thc bow firm and wide enough apart to tretch the skin into a good shape, and to he utmost tension, which adds to their alue. It is not necessary to stretch skins fu side out to show the quality. A good judge can tell a good pelt as soon as he sees thc iesh side. The prince in rcturn: doubled thc quanti- on the pressure of the atmosphere; and al- ty and sent him forty bottles. This is the joke about -Rochester nnd Oharles II.'s crew of rakes, writing pieces of poetry and handing them to Dryden so that he might decide which was the prettiest poet. Rochester, finished liis piece in a few minutes, and Dryden decided that it was the best. On reading it the lines were found to be the .following: "I promise to pay to the order of John D'rydcn twenty A GOOD story is told of :a country gen- tleman who, for tho first time, heard an Episcopal clergyman, preach. He had read much of the aristocracy and pride of .the Church, arid when he returned, home he was asked if the people -were stuck up." "Pshaw, replied he; "why the minis- ter actuallV preached in his shirt-sleeves." so by means of long continued magnetic observations, that it exerts an influence on the declination of the magnetic Jloiton Courier. A GOOD story is told of a Michigan man who recently wont down into Indiana tc buy a drove of horses. He was longer ab sent than ho intended, and failed to meet a business agreement. On being rather re preached for not being home, he made du apology "I tell you how it is, squire; a every little darned town they wanted m to stop, and be president of a WOMAN'S Stono refuse to pay her taxes at Orange, N.. Y-, on th old Revolutionary principle of no taxatio without Hid the collect? is about to levy on THE NEW ENGLAND DINNER. The New York papers contain long' lints of thc late Enrfand dinnn. England dinner in that city, together great many prominent persons, who wens invited, but were unable to attend. Of tlw latter we present a few brief extracts. As tins celebration is not without its political MglniK-ance they may not be without inter- est to our readers. Henry A. Wise, of Vir- 1' then, decline. But it is not for want of any respect or gratitude to tho of ew England. Thc v wcro 1 men, who looked to the real and not to the shadow of thin-s ivcre men of God, whose walk and conversation was founded on the monuitv of thc Gospel. Thev were 1'hey w ong iuffenng for the cause of religious t. ccdom. 1 hey were brave and earnest and honest, and manly andVerse- vcring in maintaining human righls by tho observance of law and order and decency n all things. If  ound themselves and their heirs forever. Lime, events, other struggles, renewed cov- enants, more bloodshed, greater interests ughcr responsibilities, weightier trusts! grander prospective scenes, greater dread of worse disasters than could once be con- everything which has grown up or come after, or is gone, or now is, or s hereafter to be. binds us, the heirs, co- icirs and descendants of the forefathers of this republic, to each other more than they were bound together." From ex-Governor Walker's letter, which drew forth a good deal of applause, we take the following specimen of grandiloquence As your Fathers landed on your rock- bound shores, there dawned the flrst faint glimmering of the great principle of sclf- ;ovcrnmcnt, which rose upon enfranchised Humanity, in all its meridian splendor, on thc 4th of July, 1776. That great princi- ple of self government is about being sub- cctcd to a fearful, and, perhaps, a final in an unhappy western territory. If this principle can be subverted there, and such JURYMEN SHOULD SOT BLOW THF.IH NOSES. following story is told of the cele- brated Sergeant of the English bar: >n one occasion he was counsel ior a poor girl who had been charged with robbing icr master. It happened that just before AVilkcns rose to address the jury, one of the latter had been blowing his nose so pow- erfully, as to produce a red and watery ap- icarance about the eyes. The incident was ;urncd adroitly to account by thc learned advocate, who exclaimed, 1 perceive one of the jury has been and follow ing up thc words in a tone of sympathy for the accused, he so worked upon thc feelings of the jury, that veritable tears at last did respond to his appeal, and the con- tagion quickly spread through the court. The consequence was the acquittal of the prisoner, (guilty or who never imag- ined before that she had been so wronged. SEWAUU'S OPINION or HABD ator Seward is a shrewd observer, and who makes this prediction to which he is will- ing to stand." ?l In my judgment the acceleration of bus- iness is going to bo rapid just m propor- tion to the rapidity with which business has declined, and I expect to see CTCry day and every hour of the day, marked by a nse in the prosperity of tho country, graduated just exactly by the suddenness of the de- pression. Tho causes of the disaster are gone. I think there is nothing before us but a groat revival of business and plethora of money to revive it in all I may be mistaken in this, but I a.m witting jj ,tS titIXt truths have been promulgated in thc Dec- laration of American Independence, the blood of the Revolution will have been wasted on a soil where military and des- potic power will soon resume their swav, as under our suicide the freedom of our coun- try and the world forever sank, with its last bubbling into that great deep whenr it should remain until the sea give up their and man shall answer for his crimes, at the dread judgment scat of his creator. "Asa I have no claim or ancestry on New England, and presume that for thk kind invitation to your anni. vcrsary dinner I am indebted to mv v.ifc, who is n descendant of the illustrious Bos? ton printer boy, Benjamin Franklin, in whose principles and virtues I have endeav- ored to rear my Public business at Washington detained Senator Seward, and he transmitted tho subjoined excuse for non attendance: AL-BCTN, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 1857. DEAR SIK: I have the honor of the invitation of thc Xcw England Society, for which I pray you to them my grateful acknowledgement. Inasmuch as the festival will fall on a dav when I shall be in attendance on public affairs at Wash-, ington, I can hardly promise myself tho pleasure of participating ir. iU celebration. Cut I certainly shall, if the indulgence shall not conflict with official engagements. A native of Xow York, proud of her present position, and hopeful of her future great- ness, I am sensible, nevertheless, that her. fume dates from the revolutionary age. On the other hand, I think most enlightened men will agree that Xcw England has an important history reaching back and con- necting with thc great civic revolution of England. Others may detract from Eng-. land in modern times, but for myself I con- fess that I regard her policy as the surest guides to that national pros- perity and eminence which we all arc am- bitious that our country shall attain. I ani, dear sir, with sincere respect and esteem, your friend and humble servant, WILLIAM II. SEWARD, To Hoy. E. D. MOUGAN, GETTING OVER A class which graduated not over a thousand years ago, embraced among its members one Tom ElHott, an. incorrigible wag, who was not noted for any particular and marked atten- tion to his studios. Mathematics was a par- ticular object of Tom's disregard, and this caused him an occasional jeu d'aprit with the dry professor of conies. On one occa- sion, thc professor, during tho recitation, asked Tom to explain the horizontal paral- lex of the sun. Tom replied, "I don't know how." said thc professor, "suppose you were appointed by thc Gov- ernment to ascertain it, what would you gravely responded. Tom, amid the conclusive laughter of the lass, and even thc professor actually pcr- ictratcd a grin. Pi.E.vsunEor all thc amu- jcmcnts that can possibly be imagined for i working man, after daily toils, or in tho nterrals, there is nothing like reading s icwspaper or a book. It calls for no bodi- y exertion, of which already he has had nough, perhaps too much. It relieves his ionic of dullness and sadness. Xay, it ac- companies him to his next day's work, and ;ives him something to think of besides tho nechanical drudgery of his every day oc- cupation; something ho can enjoy whilo ibsent, and look forvrard to with much plea- sure. If I were to pray for a taste that would stand by me under every variety of circumstances, and be a source of happi- ness and cheerfulness to me through life, and a shield against all its ills, however things may go amiss, and the world frown upon me, it would be a taste for Sir John IIcrtdM. A KNOWING beggar posted himself at the door of the Char.ccry_ Court, and kept saying" A penny, please, sir! On- ly one penny, sir, before you go in." "And why, my man inquired an old country gentleman. "Because, sir, the chances are you will not have one when you come the beggar's reply. WASTING Arnott TFM one day while panting with the astmah, looking out of his'window, and was almost deafened by thc noise of a brawling fellow, who was selling oysters, Said he, "That extravagant feUo'w has wasted in two conds as much breath as would tejlji, for ft month."   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication