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Grant County Witness Newspaper Archive: June 23, 1859 - Page 1

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Publication: Grant County Witness

Location: Platteville, Wisconsin

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   Grant County Witness (Newspaper) - June 23, 1859, Platteville, Wisconsin                               8AWDEB80K, Editor and Proprietor. amd' Famtly" Interests tike People. Dollar VOL. L.- LANCASTER, WISCONSIN, THURSDAY, JUNE 23, GRANT COUNTY WITNESS IS rUIlLISUEn' Every -Thimday Homing, BY ISRAEL SANDERSON, At Lancaster, "Wisconsin, TERMS: Single subecriptioD, per annum, in advance, u eight months, fcmr Curus of five, per annum, in advance, twenty, 1-50 1.00 .76 .60 6.50 12.00 to In the mod twenty An extra copy will be give the pernoii getting up either of the Clubs. Club rates will not apply to the village of Lancaster. UXITEJD STATES GOVERNMENT. President, James Buchanan, of Pennsylvania. Vicel'resiOcnt, John C. Dreckiiiridfe, of Ky. Sccn.-t.irv of Slate, of Michigan., Secretary of War, JohnB. Kloyil, of vlrglmi. Secretary of Navy, Isaac Toucey, of Conn. Secretary of Treasury, llowell Cobb, of OeorRia. Socrvtirv of Interior, Jacob Thompson, "f Miss. Attorney G-neral, Jeremuih S. Djotk.ofPenn. Post-Master General, Joseph CommiK-ioner of Office, Thos. A.Hendr.ckB. Commissioner of Indian Altos, G. W. CbnimiMionor of Pensions, Josmh Minnt. Chief Justice of Supremo Cmitt, Rogur B. Justices, John Mcl-een, .fumes M. ayn rn lakes. The expenses of the last Congram be- ng each member world makes you stare so, Bella I told von-his hair would bo as dark ns your own by this time, but you didn't believe it." Here Mr. Meirs consulted his watch and said: "Bnt I must be in Wall street by ten; so I shall be obliged to trust you to your own government till With this, Mr. Meirs departed, leaving mighty warm hearted and agreeable when they have once got together. Howbeit, I fancy there is a slight vein of duplicity in the best of them, I do "0, no, papa, youshould notbe so hasty in your conclusions, for haven't I told you all along that cousin John's hair was red, and that my principal objection was based our hero indescribably confused. No Up0n that fact. But. you sec there is a slight mistake somewl'fire, for his hair (pointing to the coonterfeit is quite dark and gjjssy. .1 most readily confess, papa, thr.t I like Jolm very much: a great deal better thin I expected to. I do, indeed." said Mr. Meirs esultingly, "if I were in John's place, I would just take the liberty to strike while the iron is hot. There is nothing gained by delays, and sooner was he gone than Bella burst out into a ringing laugh, arid exclaimed: "How funny! Merriment is said to ba contagious. John Peters laughed a response to- Bella, and he had u most beautiful way of doing it, which Bella, in spite of the novelty of their situation, really acknowleged with a blush. "There has been a great mistake pastor who presided over the church with. which Mr. Meirs was connected had.. al- ready arrived, accompanied by a clerical acquaintance. "While Bella, attired in a dress of white satin, with a veil surmount- ed by a crown of flowers, had just entered, resting on the arm of the brides-maid. During the sensation created by the en- trance of the bride, another door was opened, and a young man, some five feet four inches in height, with dusty garments and very red hair, was pushed in by the servant, and with much amazement de- picted on his freckled unprepossessing in the nearest any particular countenance, sank down chair, without attractin said Peters, bowing sorrowfully, as though nence vou might .be as far oft' the handle "I said Bella, '-'you are trying to cover up your red hair with a wig. I hate red hair, and the change makes you look j so does, indeed." "It is all a persisted John, reddening; "I never wore a wig in my "Then you must have colored it. for it- was red ten years ago, and I used to at vou when I was angrv, and advised as yon wore a week ago." "O, no, I nm not so fickle; but I will leave the whole matter to you and John. Whatever he and yon think proper, I will submit to; I must confess I like him a great deal better than I expected." "There, Bella, you talk like a sensible cried Mr. Meirs; I knew you would. I like your resolutions. There is nothing so rare in the world as a sensible girl at vour time" of life. John is no fop or prof- observation at the time from the .rest of the company assembled. As the ceremony progressed, and the question was asked by the clergyman if any oVyected to the bans, he of the red hair and freckles rose up and said: "I ob- ject. Mr. Clergyman, most decidedly ob- Horace Greeley on Kaasai. Horace Greeley writes to the Frifaate from Manhattan, May 26th, that he likes Kansas better than he expected; that the soil is richer, deepcryand -better watered; that the timber is more generally diffused and the country more rolling. The other side of-the picture we' quote as'follows: But an unpleasant truth must be stated. There are too many idle, shiftless people in Kansas. I speak not here of lawyers, gentlemen speculators and other non-pro- who are in excess here as else where; I allude directly to those who cal themselves settlers, and who would be farmers if they were any thing. Toaeei man squatted oh 'a quarter-section in: cabin which would make a fair hog-pea but is unfit for a human habitation, an< there living from hand to mouth by a little of this and n little of that, with hardly an acre of prairie broken, (sometimes without a fence with no garden, no fruit trees, "no for some one to come along and buy out his "claim" arid let him move on to repeat the operation somewhere is enough to give a- cheerful, man the horrors. .Ask the squatter what he means, and he can give you a hundred good excuses for his miserable condition; he has no breaking team; he has little or.no good he has had "the his family has been sick; he.lost two years and some stock by the border ruffians, etc., etc. cried Mr. Meirs, springing lest it set the bed-curtains on fire." from the fact that precisely nine o'clock a. I "What an awkward cried WM. E. CARTER, A TTORNEY awl Counselor I.nnrastcr, Crant cwmty, Wisconsin. Collections. carefully attemlt-il tt. ami Ueinit- i.riuiiptly m.idi-. Particular attention unitl to payment of and examination of I.anu Lancaster, Wisconsin, May 21stj ISM. [lj STEPHEN O. PAINE, TTOKNEY at Law, Solicitor in Chancery, Vlnttyville, Wlpcouimi. m. found him standing at the door of Mr. Joshua Meirs' counting Joshua Meirs having advertised that 11; rning for a book-keeper. "Mr. Meirs: I believe I have the honor of addressing Mr. Joshua Meirs said John Peters, touching his hat and bowing profoundly in the direction indicated. ''The responded Mr. Meirs, with a frigidly dignified nod. "Can I be of any service to you Please proceed." John Peters hesitated and glanced about the room: the presence of Mr. Meirs was recognizable in every object. shall I do? If .there only a hole thought John. But there was no hole, and our hero proceeded: "My name is Peters." Mr. Meirs sprang from his arm chair ns you to keep one eye open when you slept, i He will make you a good husband; will look after your interests, and I think, will be worthy of you. As for the wed- ding, John, it shall be left entirely'with j-ou to say. Bella is- willing, and I can see nothing to prent its taking place right away." To say that our hero was perfectly un- affected by these remarks, would be pre- 1' I sinning too much. :I think whatever you think John, desparately; "It is true that I am John Peters, but-not the John Peters you take me for; and as for having red hair, I never had that honor, 1 assure you." It was now Bella's turn to look sur- prised. "And who :i re cried Bella; you not John Peters of Baltimore "On the contrary, I am John Peters of Connecticut, a graduate from the Mercan- tile College, and at present in search of a situation. -I am not your cousin, and ncv- COBB Jk MESSMORE, TTORNEYS and Coxmsekn-s nt Land and Agents, Mineral Point, wuntv, and LaCmssr. UiCrosse eolintr, U is. C. k M. Vra'eticv Law and aHmd to. Agcncu-i and Collections ia all of Wisconsin, Minnesota and Northern IOWA, Special attention piven to practice iu the the United States. Ofl5cvv al Miueral I'oinUotiitosite tin at In nith Court up Block, Front m A. C. EASTLAND, TTORNEY and Counselor at w, KichUml Center, UicbUnu county, Wis. PRIEST Jk MINER, ATTORNEYS at Law, Kiehlaiul Cx-atcr, Wisconsin will attoad all t entrusted lo them. EASTLAND HASELTINE, said John. "Any arrangement agreeable to you will be equally so to me. I have great respect and affection for Miss Meirs, and if I can be so far forgiven as my prc- cr saw you, to jiiy before to- j j safaly that to be the husband of your daughter, this moment. or at any future time, -would be to me .the i day. Though I must confess that you an the prettiest girl I ever saw, and I begii to envy the genuine John Peters, your cousin, for I can't help liking you a great I deal already." "You do Indeed, how funny! choicest gift of Hea-ren to bestow. sensible said Mr.Meirs, "and as you nre obliging enoiigh .p. T ________ _r n i to leave the matter to my direction, I shall though he had'received a shock from some j you are not my cousin from BaHimore.and saj. from Friday, the day on which anticipated your coming. .This invisible battery, "John Peters By all that's gracious cried. Mr. Meirs, embracing him. "And here, like an old simpleton, I have been what is better still, my father thinks you are. I detest a cousin for my husband, and above all a red haired husband. But will give Bella ample time for all necessary, preparations, and' you, also, to apprise how did it happen that.papa should make I yQur and such other friends at Bal- treating you, thinking you n stranger all such an odd mistake Tell me nil about j .more choose to invite.' the while, according to the most rigid rules of etiquette. I deserve to be blowed it. the fact whole thing was for having ever studied Count de Okay's j a mistake from beginning to end, and was attributable to an advertisement in the Txeasise, But how is your father stupid in me: I can see him in every fea- I morning paper. turc of your good spirits, I reck- j book-keeper, and advertised. on Your father wanted a I saw the toward and confronting the excited young man of the red hair and freckles. "And who are you that dare to object to my daughter's marriage with her cried the enraged Mr. Meirs, shaking his fist in the face of the terrified intruder. 'Speak L or by my faith I will bundle you head foremost into the r: of the red hair, "while you continue so es- cited." my cried, the mer- chant, still more excited in his. tone, "I'll just give you to understand that you have no right to dictate in my own house And suiting the action to the word, .he sei2ed the intruder by the shoulder, and forced him out of the room. cried Mr. Meirs, turning to the clergyman, "please proceod with the cer- emony." Agreeably with Mr. Meirs' request, the ceremony proceeded, and in less time than it takes us to relate it, John Peters and Bella were indissolubly united in the bonds of wedlock. No sooner was the ceremony over than Bella, clasping her husband's hand, knelt before her father and said: "Forgive us, dear father, for the deception we have, practiced upon you. This is not cousin John of Baltimore." who under the sun ia he cried Mr. Meirs, glancing about the room, in a most bewildered manner. "It is Jolm Peters, but not cousin John. My'dear husband came in. the first place to you in search of a situation, and you, forgetting that there might be another John Peters in the world besides your IB Buchanan an Exception! The Washington correspondent of the Philadelphia Press says that the care- fully prepared speech of the President, made at Weldon, N'. the subject of a good deal of .remark. He does not say that he will not be a candidate for re- election, but he is looked upon in political circles as having a decided the other way. True he says "for at the age I will have attained when my term shall have ended, and when I shall go into re- tirement, man is warned to remain at rest, and prepare for that great event which must overtake us all." Presidents an the injunction, "Be ye always ready, for ye know not the day or the. hour ilis time to be ready is "when my term shall Of all the different species of wood, that of the pomegranate tree is said to have he jreatest specific gravity. Kipo.'peaches have-made their appear- ance in' Savannah. They were raised ia Burke county, Georgia. Newspapers were first published rope in 1562. The .nnt paper published in the United States was at Boston" in The Syracuse (if. Y.) CotmV-tolb of a hen's egg weighing one pound and twelve ounces, which had been sent to that office for inspection. containing a lot of wooden-soled shoes, supposed to date back to the tima .of Syini. exhumed in Philadel- phia, the other day. Hailstones, from the sixe of partridge eggs to that of goose eggs) fell in TaBa- dega county, Alabama, recently, doing considerable damage. What is the difference between troth and eggs? Ol, "Truth crushed to earth -wilL.riM but eggs won't. Why mischievous boy who tics a tin lantern to the caudal appendage of his dog, like the poet's hero Because' he "points a moral and adores a.tail." A locofoco paper in Mississippi that since the days of Jefferson "we have never had a: more popular President than James pottibly, ex- have ended tirement.'-' "when I sball :go into 're- ception of Andrew Two bottles containing curious descrip- tions of gold and silver coin, hare ploughed up at Gwaultncy, Suney county, Virginia.. The money is of English' and Spanish in each bottle.'- .One of, the largest castings'ever mado iu the United. States was made for a new sloop-of-war now building at the Kittery yard: It was a- steam condenser, and nineteen tuns of metal were used in t .casting. The': New" says: Greek Slave, which is now' made to mcnt'Uic palatial drj-goods store of ;Stcw6tt, has been placed there it is said, notfor ornament alone, but a model I be allowed my preference in this answered our hero.-.glanc- inn- at Bella for encouragement, "I would T 0 nephew John, have innocently assisted us much rather not mention it to my father neP' e and friends till afterwards, and thus give them an agreeable surprise. In fact, be- I see: no matter about the an- i advertisement, and applied directly for the j fore j you morning, I had not even swer: "arrived in the morning j situation. Before stating my business. I! dronmad of .soehgood fortune." tired out, no doubt Yes, of course, how introduced myself as Peters, whereupon interposed Bella, car- could you to bo otherwise Ilb'de father, fcrgettaiB-that there inignt j not feel much :ill night, I Perfectly..unespecteJ. your be another John Peters iu the world, -i bundled me into an and harried dream of your coming be- LU" u r IK i rt v me here before I could offer, an esplana- fore the expiration of another i nestly, "your father might not feel much like journeying so soon after an attack of As for me, I-would a great deal awav which would trmitrtl them iu KichUi father said in his letter a week from .Friday; io-dfty, let me see, is Wednesday, which wouM Iwe it a from day UNITED STATES HOTEL. LAXCASTEU, Wisconsin, Cor- of P. Ward; 'ietor. StaseOfHee. Luiin.itrr. ViMontin, Mav ilst, are just as welcome- Here comes tbe om- nibus; it will take us within two minutes' walk of niy Belhi is at home this morning. She can't help but tion..- "How odd esclfJirued Bella. "And vou are not my cousin, then, after all, but I. .rather like you, and am not a little pleased 'with the advor.turCj because we j'can hoth'laugh together ovor father's mis- i take, and the absent John Peiers's red hair." be'spent on such an occasion to some poor families who are starving in this city." cried Mr. Meirs, with enthusiasm, and glancing at Bella with a world of pride and affection. spoken, my daughter. "vTiffi such prn- j deuce and such, charitable feolings, yon will miikc-vour'consin Ji-ha a pattern ofi in carrying out the deception. Therefore, vou most-forgive him, dear! father; "for; he is far less to blame; first place, beins deceived in the name, and we, in the second place; having the misfortune to greatly pleased with each other, it was quite natural to yield to the tempt- A AnemWy. .The General Assembly of the, little State of Kho'de, Island Adjourned on tlie 3rd instant, after a session of four daijt, to meet again on the second Monday of January, 1860. There were only four public acts'pussed; one making appropri- ations for the support of the Government; one authorizing the City Council.of Prov- idence to; fill vacancies in the municipal offices; one authorizing the laying of water pipes in the District of Pawtucket for.fire purposes, and one regulating the sale of stone linie burned. Richard Opinion. Richard Cobden, Reform Politician, says of our American politics "A Democrat swaggers as if the gov- cmment .belonged to liiin; a RepubJiiian on the contrary, .hesitates, doubts, .and acts as if a victory were too good for him. The one utters, fearlessly, the moat atro- cious sentiments as if they were a merit; the other apologizes for the expression of the moat striking truths. Your Repub- lican party lacks pluck.'' ation. "I answered Mr. ileirs, with much apparent chagrin, "I have just, had the honor of turning your cousin, ont ,of doors, which makes a compound blander on my part. To tell jon the truth, Bella, I am far more -vexed with my own stupid- ity than with any one else. As for John added Mr. Meirs, in a half-hu- half-sarcastic tone, "I think I Jerome Old Jerome Bonuparte said .in Paris the other -dayj with a" very .desponding coun- "The days of 1SI3' are' come, No, no, your cms-, panion. You are not: old enough to know any thing aboiit.it, said the '-'I Eved. through licit all. I "tell, you, sir, we- are again in figure for. the trying on of hooped t ladies always desiring :to see how they will fit before making a purchase. J About lobsters are" sent to the Boston persons residing at 'Gloucester, who 'employ- fishermen along the coast of Maine in the the months, of March, May, and June. They are taken to Boiittm in well boats, and an average, of five cents each, making an aggregate, of per annum. of Alexander llamiUon, burled :thirty-seven; ago ini thorXtw Hnveri were a day or two since exhumed, for the purpose of bcing'rcmoveil hiit have within' t few The coffin, being of mniiogiiny, wasifouiia to be almost perfectly sound, and the cton appeared quite perfect; Mr. Walter Hunt, knowin- Tf ew Yoik on the 8th in'st. Among' a machine for cutting hy a single operation; a nail machine; a flax spinning apparatus; for palp by one operation, and sundry im- irifire ttrmi. ad ,that. he was die original inventor the "seij-ing maih'inc.' According to the' latest the neat of war, via Friance, the can- non of the' French army, wiD with the Austf inn great that tbe Muskets were invented, and ''toil in England rn 1421. to FreMk DM tbe at UuitW .Stetaa, 3.38   

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