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Oshkosh Democrat: Friday, July 22, 1853 - Page 1

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   Oshkosh Democrat (Newspaper) - July 22, 1853, Oshkosh, Wisconsin                               THE DEMOCRAT. M FVtuuiro wciur, OIIIKOIII, oowrrr, WISCONSIN, OBOnolJ BDRNSIDD ft OO. Dollars a rear when Itft by tho car- rier) whenKnturniall, One Dollar anil a halt No In ilctlral lo Uka It longer Una It U eoaildenvl Kvrupaylmfori Iwnco every ono U desired todU- It wben It U no lunger wanMI. Anjthtmr thai people need or tua vrlll 1m uken In payment, If offered. JOnWOIIK. of hrerr description, done prompt- If, Mil Mtllbcuully, mid reaiouablu OSHKOSH DEMOCRAT. Thoro'i Boom Enough for All. Whit need for all ihU fiui mil strife, Each warrtnj with each other? Why should wo In Uio crowd of life, Keep trampling down each other? I> there no goal ihtt can bo won, njhttujAlnitl No other war of getting on, llut grappling to obtain It? (Jli! follow men, hew wUdom then, In friendly warning "Yuurciaiu dlddi-, the world U There'a room enough for What If llio twarthjr peasant find No field forhonnt Inbort 111 not atop behind, To thrwt his neighbor. Tlnru la land of tunny ikliv, Whero gold for toll U giron. Where c-tory brawny hand that trlra IU itmglh can gnwji n living. Ohl fellow men, retnemher then, Whatorer chancn bcfull, Tim world U wide, whpro IliMe abide. There's room enough Tor til. Frompolioned air And tainted foilh and dwell wbero hraltll rraort'S In I'nrtllo hllli nnil "Mr-yi. ami J'lmU plenty In attendance, And crtirjr furrow of Uio plow A tndeiiciulencc. Ohl haiten, then, froin floored den. And lodging! cramped anil ainalll The world li wide In Ion.I, betliln Thore'a enough tur all In this fnlrrcgton faraway, Will labor find eniploynicnti A Ulr work, K talr ilny'ii Anil tiill will earu enjoyment. What nn-il, then, of tlili dolly itrlfr, Where rnrh WHM with hU lirothort Why need we through the crowd of lift, Kecj> trainplInD down ouch otlicrt Krnin mul crime that dUtmit cllino Will Irentlio Tnke fortuno'i tlile, the world so wMr, enough for illl There U NOT room If oni' may own 11m land that othera toil H frold be dug or grain bn aown For to gorgD and (pull Ilur. If to each the equal ehanru To plow and din bo guardul, To competence limy nil ndvanco Through honett toll rtiwanlrd. room, nud more titan room, woknow, And gold hrjronil lliu Thnnlcttlia tinn, and dinnre for gold lie Ireii naturo'a VOL. OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN, FRIDAY, JULY 22, 1853. The "World u It Eyo View. Tin UNITCD l  noi-n, liu a info iniddlo with onn eyo npon Sryllu nuj tho other on Churylnlin, nwnro of tho dangers both. Wo liuvo niitini intricuto nnd dif- ficult ipiejtions in Mir fiireif-ti relations, rarticulirly with lingland, Hpnin, and but tbcru in no njietiiil reason to apprehend at present that they may not bo 'amicably mljusted. Itussi northum boar in generally and perlmjis truly, tho leading liowuHii Europe. She undoubtedly linn n valid titln to what Ko.isnlli r.nlU "a power earth." More than twenty years ago u wgncioni French writer nnd statesninn, Bo Tminnvlltp, predicted that tho United and Uiusiii weto to becotno tho two Inudlng on.lho glolxs Mom than thirty yearn ago Napoleon predicted that in flfly yours Knropo would become either lippubli.-nii or Cossack. In tho luttcr alter- liativo, I'.nropo wntilil of conrno bo govern- by Rrnsui; in tho (aimer, Iluulnn dos- would recoi von check, mill Ihodiis- tines uf Iho couliniint would bo controlled powerful ropublic. At present, llussia, with her powerful armies and her DiMterly diplomacy, is pursuing her steady purimso iifextousivn dominion. Tho bravo Circassians huvo withstood her nmnults for many years, nnd ninny times repulsed tho powerful armies with great slaughter, but Iho great power nnd untiring pcrsovoranco of Kuwift will, doubtless, at last bo victo- riaus. Having long ngo swallowed nnd Fulauil, anil obtained controlling Jiimw in Uio uibineu of Austria nnd Pros- upon dovouring Tur- koy, nnd probably inako n meal of her nloncu, if tho HtitUli lion did not show his teutli ond bristle hii nmno at every de- cided indication of tuch a movement. OLD KNULXND, glorious old Kngland, nil bus brntej a tbouiandTram, the battle aadthrbrreie." movi s on In her majestic career amuiig tho notions, rich, fat, and hourly, quite an "old fogy'1 in her way, and yet not entirely destitute of the blood of "Young America" in her voins. She is the world's cndiicr, but tho vill resign llmt olllco one of these to her daughter on this side of tho Wter, after wo got our Tactile railroad through BTkl become the regular half-way house between Europe mid tha East In- jdies. Knglnncl bids to present a re- instance of national longevity. She luuu icndy livi-il longer Mellm- lelah, am. yot shows no signs of decay. ShohMhid hw faults, but her character has generally Imcn gornl, and tho World is largely her debtor. Him is a fricilll of civ- ilisation, frordotn, nnd Christianity. In tbo straggle which to be approaching in Europo between despotism and freedom, will be found on the right side, and will make her power felt. KIUKCI, gay, fickle, revolutionary France is a national putzle. Like Cufl'ee's speck- led pig, that would nut hold still long enough to be counted, shu alniont dcliea classification or desorijition. Her Kinpu- ror, NajOTleon III., is nisei a In- stead of tho weak, hair-brained creaturoho was thought to bit, previous to olovation to thu Presidency, lie bus proved hitniclf to bo a nmn of great nerve, shrowd, coal and during. IJut what aro really his prin- ciples and purposes, nobody can lull. Ho says, peace, pence, but Iho world hardly believes him. It may that BOIIIO of these mornings, bright and early, bo will be found pitching into England and hav- ing n neighborly fight to avenge tho down- full of his great uncle. It may bo that ho will shortly bo malting u demonstration npon Delgiiim or Italy to extend tho boun- daries of his empire. If ho keeps iiuiot till tho great continental struggle conies, between despotism and freedom, he will then bo found in the hottest of tho fight, but nobody now can guess on which sido ho will be. IrAi.r AND HuxuAiir aro smouldering volcanoes, and Muzzini nnd Kussuth are watcliing in tho distance to seo their burst- ing fires not Europe in u blaze. AUSTUU, I'ltUSSIA, ANH TlIIIKKT llUVU II future fatu depending less Upon themselves than upon surrounding tuitions. Knglaml, France nnd Itussio. uro their keepers, their backers, their guardians, their arbiters. POOR OLD Sl'ilx, feeble nnd broken down in her old age, still retains some of Iho an- cient pridu and spirit of her better days, when sho was tho foremost nation in Eu- rope nnd filled tho world with her coin. In her weakness and decay, sho still val- iantly protests sho will not part with the last rich gem of her ancient crown, Culm, tho fair queen of thu Antilles. And even now, it is said, the good old lady in giving "a pieee of her mind" to our Minister, Mr. Soule, for coming llmro, as shu suspects, with the intention to coux it, or buy it, or stonl it away from her. MKXICO is still hovering between life and death. Her doctor in thu last resort 1ms fur many years been Huntu Anna. Sho bus just called him in, nnd bo is trying to seo what ho can do to savo her. It is ilillknlt case, anil very probably beyond his skill. .Her constitution is broken. Tlio' amputations sho itullered under Doctors Scott nnd Taylor very much weakened her anil deranged her whole system. What will bo tho nalnroof Santa Anna's prescrip- tions: does not yet clearly appear. It is said ho grits his teeth at these United HtatcH of the North, but ho will hardly bo mad enough to venture on a quarrel, unless ho makes up his mind to Mil off his patient nt onco tu relievo her of hrr unTuriiifrs. Hut Snntu Anna is a powerful man, n re- mnrJinblo man, and ho may possibly resus- citate nnd regulato old Mexico, and iriaku something of her yet. At any rate, if ho finds her in a sinking condition, and is obliged to nin her ashore, it will undoubt- edly bo upon tlio const of tho United States; nnil ho will probably nniku timi.-Iy iirrnngc- mont i to suvu bis own pci-jn.ml buggagv, which is known to bo of princely tnlim. r exports of colluo uro in- creating, and her imports of slaves decreas- ing- Tin: AnuKXTtNK is still strug- gling with revolutionary troubles. At tlm last uccount.1, which cuiiin down to tlm ear- ly part of April, (iunend Unp.iiy.ii was in tho vicinity of Iluenos Ayres, endeavoring to negotiate terms of pence, in fuiluro of which, u siege of tho eity would follow. PKIIU is Herrich- est gold mines now am her (liuina Uatuls, TIIK N.vxnwicH harm- less pcoplr, thu aborigines, aro fading away dwindling in mid will probably dio at last in Uncle Sam's arms. is a great clinking among tbo dry bones of tho Celestial Empire. A rebellion has been eating its way through her immeiuo population for two 05 three years past, and strongly betokens thu down- fall of tho "Ill-other of tho and tho establishment of a nu.v dynasty. nnil wise, nud active ns an oystor, shut close in its shell, just peeping out, and awaiting for the United States iquudroii to come and open York lluilget. Lawyers and their Fees. The Ilogister is n new Daily in Philadel- phia, nnd about tho elovorest and sharpest paper issued in that quiet city. The editor appears to Imvo been absurdly accused of harboring a prejudice against Lawyers, which imputation ho rebels with spirit- as follows: "Wo not only respect Lawyers but have n lively admiration fur them. Whoever heard of ono of them taking a feo in an un- just cause? or doing a hard-hearted thing? or saying what bo did nut believe? or en- cuuniging litigation? or misrepresenting evidence lo tho jury? Do Toccpievillu rightly says they aro tho aristocracy, that the best of thu United Stales. Our own admiration of them is founded on a largo experience of virtues. Let ui call up, for u moment, from our pleas- ant memories of the post thu images of n few lawyers of our own acquaintance. There is our friend at Columbus, Miss., who never varies from his scalo of charges oven fur friends. Wo tent him onco fur collection our bill of against ncubscri- .ber. He collected it tho same day, and UE by retuni mail his own bill fur with a polito dun for tho unpaid ballanco of Wo remitted iuttatidur, thanking him for his promptness. Then thcro is thu eminent counsellor nt Laku Providence, who charged us un a bill of exchange for which'had been paid on presentation. Wo remon- strated, and ha consoled us for not having collected through n bjrflk, by the assurance that, if profcsaiounl etiquctto did not for- bid, ho would certainly reduce his original charge which ha admitted rather too heavy. A still better man was a TeXai to whom we entrusted a disputed land claim, on an arrangement called very common iu that part of tha country. A facetious dog was Smith. About oigh- teen nlilnths elapsed without our hearing from him-. Ho then wrotu ur, in answer of our twentieth opistlo, that bo had dono ro- innrkahly with tho oliiim, having compro- mised it for half tho valuo of llio property: that ho had pockuted thu half for his feo, and that we Weru really not indebted to him for anything besides tho costs of u suit ho had commenciid nnd discontinued. Wu could have fairly hugged tho follow fur his gay and careless humor. Hi-did nut givo us half the Iruublu wo had with a lawyer out at Jull'urson City, who had collected for us iv claim of several hundred. Punctual im a correspondent, hu advised us, by thu first mail, adding that tho mails wero nmdu very irregular by tlm overflowing of tho river, and did lint think it safe to remit. Wo wailed un- til summer time, until ono could almost wadu thu Upper Missouri. Thu river was so low then, hu snid, that hu found it ex- tremely inconvenient to gut bis paper up lo tho bank wheru bu usually gut it cashed. Two seasons passed by, and innumerable luttun were interchanged in regard to re- mitting drafts and inundations. At last bo- ing in need of funds, wo wrote that wu must hiMst upon having tho money, irre- spective of the stotuof tho water. Ho was an honest creature at heart, and sent, for- getting lo add tha two years interest, hut deducting per cent for his fees. Lawyers will bun little lazy, wimelimeii; but can wo bhuuu a man fur physical innpt- ness or inactivity} Tbu laziest ono wu ever knew lived at Illinois. Hi' had promised for a year or two to re- mit lo Louisville some money ho had col- lected for us. Business-like demands, ca- jolery, persuasion, argument and mciiucu had liu upon him. liu would write nu more. At last we sent him in full Ihu anecdote of thu man who wns no lazy that hi.' nto tipples off ihu tree, not being ener- getic enough to raise bis hand tu pluck thorn. This toucln.il the right spot, and ho roused himself so liir as to send tho money, Tho cH'urt may liuvu cost him his lifu, for wo bavu novel' heard of him since. In no profession is thero moro chivalrous sonso ul'honor than in that of the law. Wo havo a lively i-emumbrancu of having been long kept in constant bodily fear by a law- yer uf I.ittlo Itoelt, Hu had maintained h most obstinate silenco for more thun u year lifter receiving of ns tho full amount uf u claim. To a letter in which we ilomamicil an immediate and satisfactory adjustment of llm matter, ho answered that mir former letters were too Yankee like, but ho was ready to givo us satisfaction nt once. IIu ended by reipiest- ing us to nainu uur friend and as ho would come on and fight us un our own ground. Wo wrote him by return posl, to put n Pickwickian construction on thu uf- fensivo letter. After applying to somu for- ty lawyers to collect thu claim from our belligerent of them refusing thu business on tbu professional we sin needed ill retaining jnu, or. a prom- ise of twenty pel- cent. As the warlike one's clmrgo was twelve, sixty-eight per cent was all that over cumu in our posses- sion. Tbo Now York lawyers aro noblo nud dashing practitioners. M arm ion never charged muro spiritedly. It wns only the other day ono of them sent us u bill of for Slicing to a deposition of a few lines to provo u style of n firm, adding that be would retain tho deposition until tho bill was paid, Wu hope ho will find it good property; wo paid for another. lint we havu said enough. Our readers may think uf our nrticlu us Mr. llrown dues of iiuwspuper criticism un the that "it ia time thiii thing wns stopped." Wu Imvu shown why and how wo admire lawyers. Would any ono of them dissent from our viows, we will feo iinother to dis- with him. Why nut? Does not the accepted theory mnko uf n lawyer a moral gladiator, with "to let" on bin forehead? Does any ono foul, when listening to foren- sio olomieiico that -there is u nmn behind A Chilling Interview, In Professor Ouodricb's ISrilithEloiptcnce, wo find tbo following pirpnmt unccdoto, illustrative of thu ascendency of Lord Chatham over the Karl of "The Karl was a valetudinarian, and hu was so fearful of taking cold, especially, that ho oltun ordered tho windows of tho Houso of Lords to bo shut in tho hottest weather, while tho rest of tho peers wero suffering for tho want of breath. On ono occasion be called on Pitt, who was con- fined to his bed by tho gout. Newcastle, on being led into tho bed-chamber, found tho room, to his dismay, without fire, on n cold, wintry afternoon. Ho begged to have one kindled, but Pitt refused; it might bo injurious to his gout. Noweustlu drew his cloak around him, and submitted with a passable grace. 'Thu conference n long ono, and tho discussion continued until tho Earl was absolutely shivering with cold; when, ot last, seeing another bed in tho opposite, comer, bo slipped in, nnd covered himself with the bed-clothes. A secretory coming in soon after, found tho two Ministers in !his curious predicament, with their fncos only visible, uandying tho nrgiirneut with great earnestness from olio bedside to tlio other." Bestitmlcm. Tbo Washington County Pott sayi n chap in a certain with whom ho is acquaint! d, having hud sanded sugar sold him, inserted in tho weekly pnpor tho fol- lowing: purchased of n Grocer in this village a quantity of Sugar, from which I obtained ONE POUND OF BAND. If tho rascal who cheated mo will solid to my ad- dress icvon Ibs. of good Sugar, (scripture measure of restitution) I will be satisfied; if not, I shall expose him. On, the following day nine men pound packages of tugar worn left at his residence from as many different dealers, each iup- posing himself tin person intended. Individualist. I At a social meeting thu members of tho Press and others, nt tlio Tails of Niaga- on Saturday lint, sumo remarks weru niiido by Mr. Wulln, of tho American IIx- pre.is Company, which nro extremely in- teresting us indiciitivii of American enter, priso, but more especially of thu sell-rcli- ancii nnil Individualism which not only mark tho character of our countrymen, but which, without figure uf speech, may ho said to iimnguratu a new i-ru in llm history uf thu world. Mr. Wulli staled that in tho year IBID, bin hmttu began their business, and all they curried could bo put in ono carpet bug. With Adunnt Co, they now divi- ded the IIHUUCM of J-lxpress Forwarding, Thu ground daily traveled over by their thirteen thousand miles, Certain- ly this in great illustration of private en- terprise. Thu dividing lino between these immeasurably than Ilium of York nnd Lancaster, though mmg by tho Ohio and llm Lukes. Wo mention this fact, 113 it gives us an opportunity for remarking upon what is certainly tho main characteristic of our countrymen, and murks u now era in hu- man quality of Individualism, If either tho houso of Livingston, Wells Co., or Adams it Co., wcru iu certain Eu- ropean coinitrii's, for example, it would bo a Government nllhir, or patronized by Ciov omnium, and tho vast services it performs would advnuco the interests of somonublu family, and bu connected with sumo high- sounding titlo to swell its iiiiportuncu in thu eyes of llm vulgar. If wu tnku ono of thcsu American firms and sum up thu labor, supervision and responsibility which they daily undergo to travel over thirteen thou- sand miles, and deliver, to tho minute, property to tlm value of millions of dollars, it will bo evident that their operations nro as largo and imposing as thuso of a Govern- ment bureau; with this difleronce, howev- er, hu it bantu in mind, that tho partners nru plain do not figure ju the stupid book.i called histories, which uru for thu most part bald driveling stories of red-tnncism, with thu work of tlm peo- ple left aro not culled tho Lords of tho Treasury, Itight Himoniblu Director of the India House, nor to conio nearer home, havu thuy lliusnnbbish impertinence of Honurablo prefixed lo their imnio as every politician 1ms who squirms bis way into u Government coiiiiculiuu uf whatever kind. Let IM extend tho parallel from u quasi Pust-Olficu in private hands to thu Daily Press. Tho editors of thin country huvo no titles. They do not figure iu history except it bo that of their own trndu. llut let un luuk at u daily journal, and cinnpuru the ideas in it, upun Government oven, with thoMi onnnciatcd in Stato papers. When wu consider the editorials upon for- eign and domestic facts and theories, which invariably taku preccdcncu in puiut of tiinu over tho debutes in Congress or thu messages of Presidents; the money ar- ticles, every duy, which give us much in- formation as any Treasury Heport; tho Foreign Correspondence which renders tin) buaiuuM of an American resident Min- ister u sinecure, as it habitually foi-.-stidls his Stato tiicrots, and leaves bis services to consist mainly in procuring tickets to halls and dinners fur his traveling countrymen; the criticism un all tho new publications, which does onco n week that which tho Quarterly Heview dues onco iu three tho notices uf all new productions of art, of statues when wo havo them, of pictures, of opcnis, and concerts; the us- ncrtiim of new ideas which county heroes nud parish politicians uro unequal to, ei- ther through want of apprehension or mor- al diurnal reports of lectures, millions, discoveries, find ill tho Individualism uf tho Press, a great though nnncknowlegeil legislative function which is beginning to override tho forms nnd tcdiousncM of governmental assump- tion, and with a collossul hand wrilu out a new future for personal ambition and gen- eral weal. In tho history of tho past, nothing is so prominent and dreary as tho utter insigni- ficance of the masses. They do, iu tbo cant of Iho historian, nothing. They are, intellectually, ignored. Thuy aro not even mentioned us liands. It is kings who build' cities and make tho architect or the mason, nor tho jurist or publicist. Kvouinournwn times, tbero is tho Calf Kapolron, which is pointed tu with pridu by Frenchmen, but simply is an evidence of imperial prowess, and national weak- ness. It is thirefuro with exultation that we turn lo tho great fact which lies before us, that tho debris of government prido iu this country is more and tnoro triturated by Iho individualism of democracy. Our cities aro built by nobody in particular; our uro created without tho swell and bluster of a single predominant naino our laws uro codified without a ref- erence to national littleness; our people nru crystalizing in every form of generous and brilliant novelty. Tho imnivor.mry week at Now York, in this view, is mi encouraging product of tbo times. Without a bayonet or a bull to furcu together companies, they como from tho remotest comers of tho vastest of ejn- pires: self'impollcd, self-constituted, they inquire, discuss, agitate: they hear'lleports which their bout wisdom and industry bavo ripened throughout tho entire year; they determine fresh arrangements for action nnd ocuuBmy: they present in detail llm great formulas of spontaneous concentra- tion, in opposition to tho hideous falsehood of centralization, which is thus far tho highest effort uf Europe. This spontanei- ty, this agglomeration of individuality, is to be Iho dividing lino between tho future nnd tlio past. It is to signalize effort from n new point of view. It is to reconstruct tho philosophy and incident of history. It is to fructify evory, even tho least, intellec- tual particle which may require universal light for iu Y. TriAtou: Bus small bottle filled with 'doctor's staff." Malno Liquor Law in Vermont. A correspondent iil'tho New York 'frili- une writing, from lliirliiigtini, Vermont, spimking of llm working uf Iho'Mniiir Li- quor Law in that place, gets off tlm follow- ing: If inori- proof was needed to how tharnngly our law has donu its work in Ibis village, it can bo obtained by (pending u few hours in tlio itoru of our agent who in coiuniiiMiioni'd to sell fur med- ical purposes. Ho is a uliruwd man, and as the sailors Kiiy, has "weather ryu open." It luw a ilillicull mutter to de- coive him, fur hi- hits studied well thu ropes in the ship hu is upjinintcd to sail, fiiuco this law h is linen w> judiciously and yet vigorously uxcuutiil) 11 hundred of sickness occur wheru there wns not appa- rently onu before. And it is amusing to listen to thu stui'iert and witness thu inge- nuity of hundreds whn eumu after liquor, but who go away thirsty stomachs and empty Imtllcn. An u general rule, when strangers call, tbo requires n certilicatu from a physician. "Mr. I wish you would put a pint of your bust brandy in this said n yrmng man, placing tho bottlu on the counter and numb camphor yum be- side it. "I want it to mix with this cum- pbor. Thu doctor thinks it will bu good for mu us a'm somewhat out of health this spring. replied tin; ngent, while nil arch smilo was playing about the corners of his mouth, Thu liquor wns drawn and put into the bottle. Thu is a politb man, and thought ho would save the young gentleman thu troublu of mixing Iho cam- phor with it by doing it himself. Hu very politely and kindly pulverized Iho gum and put it into thu bottle, while tho young gentleman silently looked on with u fuco very much elongated. continued thu limit. "This is forth proof brandy, nnd will soon cut tho mniphor." Tho young man paidn half dollar for thu brandy, put the butllu in his pocket and si- lently walked nut, cursing iu his heart tho ollicious kindness of the Thu thing was donu up so smouthly mid so kindly that tlm thirsty young man could not say n Word, but his fuco looki d nnuterablo things. Women cnmo with tho "roots and herbs" ill their bottles all ready to bu soaked in liquor, but a physician's certificate has ti moru potent charm with tbu ngent than bottles filled with herbs. Sometimes they bring thoir children with sore brads, and point tu thorn us inducements to obtain thu liquor, but thu ngcnt thinks jmru cold Wa- ter is tho best for such ailments. "Will yu bo so kind nl to let mo havu n pint of new rum, God Men said un elderly woman, "my poor Inuband hasn't had n drop for three weeks." "Let him go without just thrco weeks lunger and hu will not want it lit replied tho agent. "I cant let you havu tiny." A rough-looking unrtoiucr ci.me in nnd wanted u quart uf alcohol. Tho promptly drow it, but said when hu look the pay and banded llm liottlu to the man, "you must bo careful how usu this ar- ticle, for it is mighty strong." 'I supposu it is liko new grnflly replied thu man. 'Very far from answered tho agent, smiling. "It cuts liku a knifu and takes ill'tho skin wherever it goes." "Then I will thunk you tu exchange it for said the man. Thu agent declined, but f'mi'lly took back the liquor, and paid him tho money, and tho mnn went away with nn empty jug and a flea in bis ear. Another caino jumping iu, and wanted two quarts of new rum tu bntlio his swollen fuot, which hu ullcrud tu iinstncking and show, but thu agent bad no particular wish to seo a swollen fuot. Tho man said it cost him two York shilling's u week to bathe that foot, and didn't know bow ho could get along without bathing it in now rum. A physician happened to bu present, who resides hero now, but who has practiced iminy years in your city. The physician told him that nil tho good quality in thu rum was thu water in it, mid advised him to go home, wet unmu tuwek in water, put them on bis font nnd keep them llicro until they becainu dry, nnd then exchange them fur wet ones; also to keep his foot still a day or two, and hu would warrant the man that Iho swelling would go down. Tlm man was very reluc- tant tobelievu such u simple remedy would do any good, but hu wentnwiiy thirsty and rith no musical jingling of liquor in his jug. The above cases occurred in a short time, and hundreds ofolhers might be men- tioned, lly adopting such a course, tho agent is not troubled with so many calls as ho otherwise would be. Apparently there is not a tithe of thu sickness in town thcru was a few days agu. If calliii'} for liquor bo a proof of sickness, then tiro peoplo of Diirlington nnd vicinity nru very much more healthy than they worn two weeks What Two Actes can do. Thu twenty-sixth meeting of the Ger- nmntown (near Philadelphia) Farmers' Club was held at thu homo of I'hilip H. 1'rciu, on the 23d of November. He is Iho editor of tho Gennaniuwn u warm ami uctivu friend of nericulttire, horticulture, He., and tin- originator of the Club. Though his whulii plot nf ground comprises less than two acres mid u half, yet bu manages to produce upon it, in jierf.-ction, n little of eviirythine. Thoio who are sighing fur more laud wi 11 do well to read his statement carefully, mid inquire whether- it would nut be wiser to cultivate Ihuir present acres better, limn lo add lo their number. Tho reporter nt the meet- ing states that during lliu pre.'cnt venr Iheru WITH cut two tons and nhalfof prime hay; there wi-io patches of lun.ips, car- rutn, parsni'pn, beets, (ihnio pen.., frejule, anil hnlf a dozen of other kinds of beans; falsify, let- corn, fSiuwell'n Sugni mid Ad- potaliics, (lhr.-o varie- iquiisliCH and tomatoes, g.plimts, iinpiii-agus in abundance, celery (of splen- did together with every other kind of vegetable lo bu found in the cuta- lugne. His fruits consist of im Inns, six kinds of cherries, live kinds uf plums, peaches, twenty-eight varieties nf r elect Iwclvo varieties of red, white, and black currants, goom berries, blnckbcn ics, and four varieties of raspber- ries, grapes, ttc. In llio garden and mansiun yard, there was n choicu collection of flowers, among them many select lines nnd vines. The ornamental trees consist of five varie- ties uf thu fir; llm Jupunica cryptomcria, thu Deodar cedar, llio Irii.li yew, nnd the American nrlmr vitie; lliu European linden, thu sugar and silvur nniplcs, thu Englinh and mountain ndi, In addition tu thcsu, Iheru was u number uf beautiful Polish nnd peafowls in thu harn-yanl; a f ili-poml in tho garden, and u large number uf chuicu fancy pigcuin nt the In all this thero is an excellent tattu displuyi d. Wu noticed that thu IIOIKO mid ollicrs wrro lighted with gns, warmed with n heater, and supplied with water from tin- public works. Ilttlhs, hot and cold, have for years been mipplied by n reservoir on an elevated buck building, holding fif. teen 4hniln.il gallons, which has idso fur- iiishcuVpuru soft ruin water for various parts uf tho building. In tho garden is n small greeti-hoiue, excavated in lliu ground, to tin- depth of Ihrcu or four feet, framed up ut thu sides, ruined n couplo of feet ubuvo Iho ground, and covered with glass, In this enclosure ur pit Iho usual shelves nru ar- ranged to receive tbo putt; and wu are as- sured by Major Freas that it is the best possible provision fur flowers and almost every description of plants in winter. Hoses, particularly, flourish in much great- er perfection. During the wholu of tbo last unusi'nlly severe winter, but n unglo delicate, night-blonining jcufumiliu u'ns at all injured by the frost. Tills green houso requires no artificial heat; In the hut beds we found encumbers and cauliflowers up, luttnco and spring radii-lies full grown. We may truly in regard to tho "Telegraph that it is u farm in miniature; but in comfort, convi niunco and taite, without any large pretentious, to moru costly elegance, it is a "pattern plan- and would, in the full growing season, nlTurd compensation for a visit from any of our ponderous fiirinern. In n word, it is, in tho strictest sennu of tho w ord, u ADVEBTI8INO TEBKB. Onn .quarc, (la or or twice. 00 Dim ubo mown...............J M Ouoaquarollirwmoi.Uii..............300 Ono one half year..............BOO Olio ujuaro one rear................BOO One lirarUl column li.ua rear BOO One fourth of column Oiree irranilis.......e 00 Ono fourtii column one month........ 300 Ono half column onn year............ 0000 One column one year.................40in Oun rolumn ono rw, with tlm of rliNURtng oiw Wjuare  vod. Ono of tho boldest of tho company asked why tho familiar object wns missingT lo whiclr thu Supreme Pontin" laconically aruwered, 'The fish ii caught." Tlio Want cf a MAino Law. A young man iu a ittata of intoxication stepped into a confectionery shop on Water St.. a few evenings sinco and culled for a glass of beer. Noticing his condition tho proprietor refused to sell him any, n-mark- ing that hu 'had already moru thun was proper for him.' answered Iho young man, 'I'vu been trying to keep tuber all day nnd I can't.1 'Well, I can't sell you nny beer, mul you need nut ask for it again.' 'Only ono glass, comu heru's your mon- ey.' one.' 'I'm (ii dry.' 'Well, there's u glass nf cold drink.' Stumbling up lo the counter, tint poor in- cbriate drank n couplo glasses of wntor, nnd then turning around, said, 'you lire first man that has refused mo liquor loiluy wish tn heaven they all had.' Hu put his hand into his vest pocket, and look tremblingly out n small miniature, opened gazed upon it for sumo mo- wns n diiguerreotypo of un id- derly Ituly upon whoso faco wero strongly marked lines of caro and nl- most ns marble, the eounteiuinetr, anil llio eye seemed lo search his soul, and speak with snd nud genlln reproof to her erring 'Oh, my mother, ho much trouble, sorrow and iinhappinuss I have caused thee." His emotion very great last tears came lo his wept like a child, whilo on tho couulunnni ea of thoso around were depicted sympathy nnd crnmnisscmtion. At length ho said 'I'm hildish, fuolith, weak.' Ho compressed ,is quivering lips, closed tho miniature, put it in his pocket, nud turned, loitered out and said, 'you won't givo mo a gl.ws of beer, a glass lo dniwn nil.' Ho pained. wat the answer. Ho wns gone. 'Hail I many such obsrrved the proprietor, to those around him, 'I would take my bonr pump nnd pitch it in- to tho middle of the (treat. I with tha Mnino Liquor Law would bo submitted to yet I, who derive a largo profit from the tain uf my beer, Would roto Tor it, and that too, freely, willingly, happily.' 'I remarked a bystander, 'tn got biM of beer, but this fellow has so sick- ened my til to that more bitter than gall would bn tluy timulant should I drink henceforth, emco habit grows upon in. uri- Advertising: It is the opinion of somu that niunry it thrown away in advertising; nnd thero am be no doubt that u largo amount is impend- ed every year in this way, for which nu adeijuatu return is received. Itut it is only onu kind nnd stylo of iilertiiiitg Mint don't pay. Judicious advertising nlwnva pnyt well. Thero it u man in Philadelphia, wlm bus expended hund- reds of Printer.' Ink, and is prepared to I'xpeml thousands more; mill what is better than nil, be it not ashamed to own that his system of liberal adverti- sing is Iho result of his success. Thu prr publishes Ilia following report of uvury neat speech be intiilu to thu members uf llio Press on the occniiim of tho opening of n new store, Head it; ye who don't believu tin-re is imylhing gained by advertising. Col. Maurice, who has recently opened splendid store in Chestnut street, below Fourth, ascribes his slice-cut in tmninrss to judicious and liberal advertising. In u recent speech which ho inudo Iu the on the occasion of opening hit new store, bo said: "I upprupriato every year, fifty per cent iif my net profit! to ihu uso of 'Primers' Ink.' Many of my old fugy friends ntli inpted lo leaion with me, nil what they euiuidercd tho folly of throwing away much money nn silly advertise- gentlemen; .onto of my advor- menlt wero a little funny; and rather out nl the old stcreotypu tlylc. 1 found, howev- er, that limy vten' not only read, but ro- membered. This wot just the riled which I withrd to produce; I alwiyt lit-' tcned to their rcmonilranccs nud then told them that in fivo years, if God tpiirml my lifu and health, I would outstrip llicin ill tlu race, unless ihuy cut ihcmsi-lvct looto from their old fogy nnd Hip Van Winklo notions and keep uj> with tho spirit of Uio npei my bi.sineis grew up aruund inoliko a little child, each inccei'diug wuek being better than the lust, until now I can Ixiail of having what is considered by many of my friends us ihu Model Illiink Honk nnd Stationery Establishment iif Philadelphia; It is my intention Iu krep a largo luuort- mcnt of the bust quality of Roods, and llliin wiih ihu mighty power of the Press, which I coiulder second only lo Omnipo- tence itself, let Iho 'whole world and Iho rest of know whi-ra they ran bi> procured; and by telling nl tbu lowest market prices, bojw to keep my little, before the wind, with all her colors flying. "Hit a great xitisfuction for mo, frnllr- mtn the to know, mid 1 havo no doubt but it will bu equally gratifying for you tu Irani, llmt in tlfa thousands of lain which I havo appropriated tu ndvi-r- lisemcnti I have novcr hud occasion lo dispute n niuglo bill from any of your ofll- ccs, nor havu I ever suffered n bill tn re- main unpaid after it win due. I glrn yorf in conclusion, ihu following scnlimeiiU What oil is to machine- ry, anil oxygen to tho existence nl uniiuiil life, judicious but librrul udvrrtixing it tu' success in Laughable During llm past winter, n rnvrrcnd cler- gyman in Vermont, being uppirhcniivo that the accumulated weight of imuw up- on the l oof of llio ham might do tomo damage, resolved to prevent it by tcntona- bly shovelling it oil'. Ho therefore nsceml- rd it, hiving first, fur fenr llio mow might all ulf nt once, nnd binuolf with he fusleuod to bis onu end nf a rope, nud giving tlm other to hit wife, hu vyent lo workj but foariug still for hit anfcty, nitid he, 'lie tho rono round your no sooner hud she done thit, than ofT went tint snow, poor minister and ull, and up went his wife. Tlruson uno side of tho barn, tlio uitonished and confounded cler- gyman hung, but on tho oilier hung bit wife, high nud in majesty snbliiun, dangling at tho other end of the rope. At that moment, however, n gentleman luckily ponied by, mid delivered ihcin from their perilous situation. Father Mitiow. A letter from Ireland, received nt Pitts- burgh, informs us that tho great npoitlo nf temperance. Father Mnlliuw is in bad health, and bus been tirrhi his return from America. Tho excitement of travel anil scenery in Ibis climate, teems to havn liorno him up during Iris short but glorious minion, only to prostnilu him llm more, when removed fnnu it. lilt race U nenr- ly run, but millions will blest hit twine, at fervently at they will biuieut bitterly the hour that matched him from hit uicfulnett and mission of Ipro. CiT The jail nt llurlingtun, Vt., ii empty lock-ups uro drscrUtL uid lilt doors may be thrown open, fur there it nobody to escape. Verdict of tbo "Moiob Lnw" ilid it. GAS rnoH Put dompony bat just been organized in Now York for lha manufacture of gat from nino wood. It 11 tald it can ha imordrd for one third cost of coal gai;   

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