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Oshkosh Democrat Newspaper Archive: August 30, 1850 - Page 1

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Publication: Oshkosh Democrat

Location: Oshkosh, Wisconsin

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   Oshkosh Democrat (Newspaper) - August 30, 1850, Oshkosh, Wisconsin                               The Democrat, at Wisconsin, eoery Friday morning, by JAMES DENSMORE. i VILLAGE Swus qudl amount of wealth that men desire, but a competency of the necessaries of life. This all have a right to, if they art willing to labor for it. A reasonable firaoqnt of labor in each twenty-foil hours, allowing sufficient time- for recre> ation, improvement of the mind, and sufficient to should hav; something left for his uvints when thai sl.eep, should be paid a sunn support the laborer, and he i From the' Boston 'iMIy Tfimea. Prayers for Prayers were put up in all the city and ifi all Episcopal churches throughout the State, on Surtday 'lastj for the souls Pearson and Boston'Times. bowe paragraph Struck niy eye, I mentally exclaimed, "How much more do men expect from God than they For last For the pardon and, forgtve- period of life arrives when his toil should end. A less remuneration would b> criminal; and the soctely lhat does net enforce full payment, either, ih-roughits political power, or through a lawofsu- cial life, fails to do Its duty to its merr- bers, and deserves, to theu' ears the constant Jiave ringing 11 sound of REVC- LUJMOiS We do not justify some of the ccnduc t of the operatives now on a strike for be ler pay, in forcible measures to prt- vent some of co laborers from pui- suing their bcsirtess. No man has i right to alt.ick and beat a fellow labore1 destroy his -property, and the property cf of his employer, because he will notcor- form to his views. Reason and argi- merit are better in such a case. Satiof; bim that his continuing to labor for ir- adequate pay is an injury to the grett body of workmen, and in the end to hirr- self, and if his family would not suffer from his discontinuing to do so, he woulJ conform to youi views. The working- men of this countiy have the political power in their hands, and if they wilt cercise it rightly, they will uccumplis i all that is desirable. The operatives have nol acted in the recent riots in which they have Though those were disorderly proceedings small poiiion of their been engaged. engaged in the cenfitituie but a number, yet the wrong- done is charge] jto them in the aggiegate. The is the proper weapon, not pivinsf pistols, and dirks. When all other means fail to secure a just rerr.urreratio1 for labor, then bloodshed come let anarchy, not, not till then. sn W to society what they pardon and forgive will come from a prop- er fountain. "All the paths of Lord are thtrcy and truth." are the merciful for they shall obtam mercy." Taur4on% Jnly. 25, 1850. to Christian 'ministers 'pray what did Sabbath? ness of tha above men. In all and in all' the the mentioned churches of Boston, Episcopal ch'urches throughout Massachusetts, were petitions offered up lo Almighty God, that He would have mercy on the 'souls' of these wretched men, and not only their terrible offences, but soften' their hearts by the influences of the Divine Spirit, and make them partakers in- the joys of immoital felicity. Now this is asking a good deal the hands of God. And it is to be presumed that those who officiated in his several "prayed in "for whatsoever is not of faith is sin." But how can they expect so much from God, when themselves have denied the poor sufferers so little Prayers, ardent, sincere, solemn prayers have been offered to for the "pardon aud forgiveness" of Webster Education of the Blind. Vl Jauegville, July By ft recent act of 'the Legislature of i his- State, (Session Laws, 1850, page provision has been made fbrvihe 'establishment of an Institution for the Ed- ucation of the Blind, to be located at this place. The Board of Trustees having for the miserable dismal have confidence in otbci measures; whei that confiJence ceases, we say let heroes and patnots use more congenial and foi- i-ible implements to secure the moslsc- cicd lights of man. Such is a brief position of our of human right and the means of enfoicing them. It wi bo seen that we have no sympathy will the opptessor, and oot afraid to hit t at a revolution cf social law, pcli ical power Jails to accomplish what believe it can and should Society has a claim upon the services of its members, and each member a clam upon society for a comfoilabte suppoi If those who possess the wealth of a con munity may say to the operative, '-we do not want your tha latter may propei ly "wa do not want yoi r idleness." If there is not a place for a I at Nature's table, who shall say that in a scramble for a seat, the strong- arm of the laborer shall not prevail If we- aie asked to respect the which says it dividual property must be protected from plunder, we answer that we will; biit there is a higher law which declares hu- manity mast bg proUe'cltd froiA suffering, and starvalion! It vvilll not do to say to the necessitous and suffering laboring classes, who produce all the wealth pf the itis in accordance; with a law of nature, or a decree cf pro1 idence, that the few are to be surrounded with, all the luxuries of life, and live in idleners, while th'e many' are for the want of bread. Carry out these principles if possible, through the quid power of suffrage and the selection nf men to political station who know tte evils and wants of the masses If th s method fails, we say to the laboring clas- ses, TRY SOME OTHER. and? Pearson, bat only boon of life life in a toiling all the iong years of their allot- ted time on earth' as an atonement for their crimes -shut out from God's green earth, away from home and kindred, and doomed to perpetual silence and ser- vitude, with no hope of happmesss only through the gtace of God truths of a Resurrective life But has man gran- ted this petition? Would the Christian churches in Boston and the Episcopal churches in our State grant it Would ths ministers of Christ grant it if they had the power1? By no means How then can they expect so much, mercy when they will show wo mercy. The Governor and Council were besought to allow the wrethed Pearson a few more days or 19 prepare for d-eatb, as he was unfit to die but even this favor was re- fused and yet the very man who would deny rzll mercy would look up and ask God to show mercy yea, infinite and eternal fivor. This has always been the custom of the judge on the bench in pro- Eejoice not at" Misfortune. Never rejoice at another's misforture to your advati- Germany they make use of the saying "my corn is-rt- which a person wjll repeat who because it may turn out tijje. In some parts of prospect of something profitab e has occuring to hira. Onee while a eurgeon and carpenter were taking a walk togeth- they observed at some distance a small viJUge, known to them both, on fire.-- The carpenter pointed to it, and said lo his corn is ripening-, for heconeleAed that if the old housi s were bnrned new ones would require o be but, as he looked intently at tie conflagration and not at the road, imnn- dlately after saying this he fell into a ditch broke his arm. said tl e surgeon, "it appears to me that my coin is already ripe." nouncng sentence of death on a fellow- mortal -'I order that you be "and that you be hinged by the neck until you are dead, dead, DEAE, ar.d God have meicy on your 1 have not uttered the above thoughts because I am of opinion that the unfor- tunate men names are at the head of this article were riot gniltyaof as black crimes as were ever placed 03 record not because commsmily were expec- ting Executive clemency, considering the demands of the present law with refer- ence to capital but because this law is sail sustained by the Christi- anity of Massachusetts and because of the of denying a poor cul- prit all mercy and then asking God to jhow mercy. What an audacious acl As much as to 'say "Great God, I have dipped my hands in the blood of rny brother, by condemning him to I have beeft deaf -to his cries for have denied him even the small favor of a few days respite 19 'prepare his scial for the bar of God 1 hvs offences restore him to thy bless him with the joys of an everlasting- salvation." How can such men themselves expect to be-Torgiven? lflf ye forgive men their trespasses, j-our heavenly Father will also forgive you; but if ye forgive not men tbeir trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your Malt. vi. 14 15. The ground may be assumed by some, that God is not besought to pardon the offender and make him a partaker of heavenly happiness only on condition of severe repentance on tltevr part. But is liot tbis asking of God more than we are willing to grant1? Are those in favor of the gallows moved at all m favor of eacy by "the- repentance" of the guilty? By no means. If it were positively de- monstrated to theft minds Lbat Wehster and Pearson had experienced trie "new birth" and were made most truthful and sincere Cristians by the pow4r of the Holy heapU yearning' only for purity and truthfulness, it would not weigh tne amount of a feather in their minds in fevor of commutation. God would forgive on such conditions, but they could not. Oh no The "divine institution" must be sustained. The aa- Jerrold defines dogmi- tism as 'puppyism come to its full gTowth." credness of the law must and man must be hanged be vindicated, whether he be wicked sinner or a devoted saint! If we err at all, let it be on the side of mer- cy then our prayers to God that he will upon therft a method ofcpratkm. It is remarkable that tbia laying hold of mobility of the frame comet alto from a Swede, (Ling, the just aaihedetn- conitiution that the body lives in motion, a'nd that the Lungs give that motion, waa the gain of another Swede, namely Swe den bo indeed formed the main truth of his physiological The latter I regard as the greatett prin- ciple of which has yet been put into body; former may Lurn out to be one of the "most vital of thw Curative Arts. G. W. duly5 organized, have bestowed their first attention upon the arrangements necessa- ry for openln-g the school, which will be on the first Monday of October next. Mr. Joseph T. Axtell, a State Institution for the graduate of the Blind in Ohio, the general superintendance of the school, asssisted by a competent and judicious matron, to whom the 'manage- ment of the household will be entrusted. The pupils will be -wall provided with boarding, lodging, fuel, at the ex- pense of the Institution, and will be un- der tha constant supervision of the Prin- cipaf or Matron, subject to the control of the Board of The Trustees, in adopting this method of making known the organization of the Institution, wish' to be understood that their labor is entirely gratuitous, except the reward arising- from the consciousness that they are engaged in the cause of hu- manity, and they solicit the earnest co- operation of the friends of this cause in aiding them in atl ways that may tend to the benefit of the and par- ticularly that those to whom this circular may be addieesed would communicate to the corresponding secietary the name, sex, residence, or pastoffice address of the Blind in thier respective localities, to- gether with their age, and cause of blind- nesss, capacity for instruction, and other information which may be of interest. The friends of thu1 pupils will be re- quired to supply them with proper cloth- log, and lo be at the expense of their tiav- elmg to and from ihe Inslitulion. By the acl above referred to, it will be seen that the Board of Trustees is author- ize j to receive donations for tbe benefiit of the Institution. We hope to be able to acknowledge the liberality of the people of Wisconsin, in this behalf, by the re- ceipt cf such aiticles as may be for the benefit of tha Inbtitution, whether in mon- ey or otherwise, and all donalions will be itrictk appljed according to the wishes of the donor. We hope to hear from you as eaily as practicable, for the reason that it may be necessary to know the number for whom provision should be made; and from ne- cessity this number must be limited until the propel buildings can be erected. Very respectfully, Your obedient servants, A. HYATT SMITH, LEVI ALDEN, WM. A. BARSTOW, C. FAlRCttf'LD, HIRAM FOOTE, IRA MILTIMORE. [Committee. LEVI ALBEN, Correspond'g Secretary. A New "Pathy." A subject-which is now o'eing much talked of here as a piece of Progress, is the new system of Mechanical or Motor Medicine, called KINESIPATHVT, OR THE COKE'OF BtsEASEs BY SPECIFI'C ACTIVE AND PASSIVE MOVEMENTS. It has been practised for 40 years in Stockholm, and is this year for the first time, bectfrriittg prominent in England. The method con- sists in applying GXterual motions, active and 'passi vie exercise, to body; and in rendering these fo special, that you can operate o'n the various inward organs, Frte.; tion, post ire, percuisioa, motion, are all made use of; and the science has ao far advanced, that already as many as a thou-j sand different movements have been de- vised for the purpose-of moving and ging the failing parts and powers within. There are thus languages of NUDGES to remind the brain, liver, spleen, and alt of neglecied dkitieS.- effects pro- daced approve the plan, and stamp it Posting of JLwmdbn N'etf-Bpapera viewed fi-om Whhin. was ft quarter before: tit o'clock when they crossed the bemg> the latest hour at which newspapers cau posted without ft a. It 'was then just drizzling newspapers.1" The great win- dow of that department being thrown open thtj first black fringe of a thundet-cloucl newspapers impending over ihe Posl- discharging itself fitfully now in'liitie; now in sudden' pluinpr; now stopping altogether. By degrets it be- gan to rain hard; by fast degrets ihe atotm chtheiion until tt blew, raitud, hailed, and snowed newspapers. A fountain ot newspapers played al tho window. Waterspouts of "newspapers broke from aml'engulph- ed the men inside1. A piodigious- imiin of newspapers, tha Newspaper' River Head, seemed to be destruction to the miserable Post 'Office. The puil office is ao full already, 'that the window foamed at Ihe mouth with nens- Newspapers fluw out like fiutii. and tumbled m again by ihe. bystand- ers All the boys tti Ltftidou set'nted ti> have gone mad, and to Le brsiuging the Posiotiioe with newspapers. Now ail J the there' as fr g-irl find then n wom- an i.o w an'd Uic'n a weak old man'. Km as the minute hand ot the fkvU near lo six, such a torrent of bey.-, ami such a-ioireni of newspapers, came 'tum- bling IB logelliec heels, bne above' anotWr thai' ihe head looked on chiefly wl.y the springing over one- heads, i'ymg the garter into 'the or on pjrts of those specifically.- as an art.' and science. It pursued s exercise, into details. fice w.th the enthusiasm ol iurpb of acrobats at M. Fiavicuni's thin t just themselves nightly, alopg1 v. ith the papers, and get deiiv. red -uSl ovir tli'- world Suddenly u siiuckisix. Shut Sesame Perfectly stil! No- body itu-re. -No louen ol ilur.laiu not a-suul loo late Uut u h a a within lien up lo ihufr ken-is- in papers on great relies una dig- iptfs as system uf admirably among newspapers ging anJ delving m- if s new description cO seek hid blasted info fugrriunts; mm up ariJ down a gigmtic trnp in ds e and deicuidmg rojm, woilcol by engine taking with them u but mjufcpapers All thei Imluiy time, all the chron'chd dt'.ufis in I mnrai i ;os.. all llis cririKC, all the ai all the vanm s, ail ihe ch.'inste, all thr fc cities, of til I 'the civil ad t'.iitlt, heapt-J on. p u celled sliilultd, pliiyi-d, dealt y.ulioitd up, uud passed trjfh'tianJ to bun J. in an nppireutly inteimirl and lu.i less coulusKm, but realty iu a ami pursued six rhg-hts cvi'rv1 all thrcugli ihe lolling ycii WhiVh of us, ihis, shall find ''fault ui.h tlte rather r-.ioit extensive jyfl'.etn of sdod aul evil, v hen djfl't omitr' it at a glance; or t-urs iu their adheres1? i'uf >rir- ed thai seventy pass  8Od one room ia 320 feet in i t whereby disease is literally for the time HANDLED. One important truth which accrues from it is, opera- tions frdtn without are propagatt j inward and that by scientific knowledge you catl' send m messages to particular parts, which are received ar.d neard just where they are wanted, and, nowhere else. The rjraciice recognizes motion for the first time as an impo ftant element in the living frame, and throws the chemical and mole- cular views, which are dead and chaotic, into the back-groahd, bringing forward the physical and mechanical, which are large enoagii to bojivinp, and founding idea may Be farmed States Hotel af Saratoga, by 1 Messrs. Marvin, from the ,fo" 'list of Provisions consumed daily., are now about 700 guests at the House to which may be 100 300 seivanis. making, f. _t i i i} -1 L t tiT feed daily. consume, fctalnr other articlei, the following div'! 500 libs. Beef, 500 do. Mutton, flTO Chickens, 150 Ducks and TnrltMi, 600 Butter, RoHs breakfast, 4 barrels of Flour. In Ohio, moat of tha .peach are really breaking doWft vvitb the abliii- dauce of the fruit. Tfr6 apples are ly as abundant; fruit crop to be everywhere good.   

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