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   Daily Northwestern, The (Newspaper) - February 8, 1932, Oshkosh, Wisconsin                               12 THE DAILY NORTHWESTERN, MONDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 8.1932 TEACHERS PLA Y TUESDA Y, FRIDA Y; OTHERS ACTIVE ST, NORBERT'S TEAM TO ENGAGE LOCALS ON COLLEGE FLOOR Stevens Point is Opponent Here Voca- tionals and St. Peter's Also Play Cuach K. Koii to flay that the Oshkosh Teacher meet St. Norbert's in a has kctball game, Tuesday night at o'clock. St. Norbert's has a vetera team, with three outstanding men The De Pcre team will play her tomorrow and Oshkosh wilt g there, Feb. 23. Heimick, former West Green Ba star. Dillon, veteran basketball an football player, and Burke, a sharp shooting forward will be in S Norbert's lineup. Grand March of at Winter Olympics Four Oshkosh teams see actio this week and the games to b played are evenly divided at horn and away. The Teachers college plays its las home game Friday night agains Stevens Point and in view of th Tact that the Pointers Oshkosh in the first game, the con test here is sure to be bitterl fought. HIGHS AT MARINETTE Showing to better advantage wse! after .week, the Highs go on th road, playing at Marinette. From past records, Oshkosh should win but cannot afford to let up and al low Marinette to surprise them lik< the northerners did against Foni du Lac a few weeks ago. St. Peter's play a non-confer ence" game Friday night, but a gam: the Green and White would like ti win. It is to be played here and the opponent will be Oakfield. Oakfield has a crack high schoo team composed of players witl three and four years experience The team has an enviable record lor so small a school and up unti a short time ago, at least, was un- defeated by a high school team Oakfield holds one victory over St Peter's. Saturday night the Vocational school team is slated to meet Kau- kauna, but the game is doubtful as some of the Vocational school teams disbanded. EXPECT HARD GAME The contest Friday between the two teachers' teams should be a hot one. Stevens Point was "red hot" the night Oshkosh played there and the aggregation coached by Eddie Kotal ran up an early lead which Oshkosh could not overcome. When the final whistle blew, Stevens Point was out in front by 12 points. Stevens Point will not win here a tussle as Oshkosh is anxi- ous for revenge. PANE'S HOLD LEAD IN MAJOR AA LOOP Though given a run for the game in the latter periods, Paine's squeezed out a victory over Elmer's, 36 to 24. Saturday night in the Major AA league on the Recrea- tional floor. As a result Paine's continued in first place. The Weigandt brothers, Kroening and Langlitz, did the heavy scor- ing for the Lumbermen, while Bin- ner and Scott led for Elmer's. Lyceum and P. H. I. put on a real battle in the other Major AA league tilt, Lyceum winning, 13 to 12. WIN IX MAJOR A Beerntsen's won the lone Major A league game from St. John's by a 20 to 13 score. Pommeraning and Vic Hoffmann scored seven baskets between them. LYCEUM (13) FG FT PF Bohman. rf 1 1 1 Beckman, If l Timni, c Frank, rg Hough, rg Kozak, 0 Ig BREAK DOUBLE TIE FOR FIRST POSITION IN MAJOR DIVISION Sacred Hearts Down Phila- keans and Kitz Pfeil Re- tain Top Place Undisputedly MAJOR LEAGUE Standing of the Teams W. L. Kitz Pfeil........ 4 Sacred Heart, .......4 Philakean 3 Parker's 2 Kronzer's........... 1 B'Gosh 1 Public Service ......0 Pet. 1.000 .800 .750 .500 .250 .200 .000 Cut Pretty Figures for U. S. Saturday's Games Sacred Heart, 18; Philakean, 17. Kitz Pfeil, 17; Public Service 15. Parker's 30; B'Gosh 9. Scene at the opening of the third annual winter Olympic games at Lake Placid, N. Y.. with the teams representing the various nations standing in formation just, before the start of the competitions They were reviewed by Gov. Franklin D. Roosevelt, of New York. HIGH JUMP CHAMP TRAINED HIMSELF IN OWN BACKYARD Path He Wore Down in Hours of Work Can Still be Seen Out at His Long Island Home By Gayle Talbot. Associated Press Sports Writer) New years ago a anky, smiling high school young- ster rigged up some jumping bars n the back yard of his home out on Island and started in, method- cally, to make a high jumper of limself. Today a visitor to the home of George Spitz, Jr., still can see where hose jumping standards were set mt. There still is the deep path made by George as he ran. hour after hour, and flung himself over a swaying bamboo pole. It is a path, you might say. that ed to a world's championship. For his same youth, now 19 and in his ophomore year at New York uni- 'ersity, set the world's indoor record it 6 feet 7 inches last year and on Saturday at the MiHrosc games bct- ered that mark by five-eighths of ,n inch. MAY BETTER RECORD Before the current indoor season nds. the experts expect him to bet- er that mark. Several times, in practice, ho has ailed over the bar at 6 feet. 10 iches. but he doubts he ever will I ttain that height in competition. "There's something about jumping i a championship that gets you." e explained. "The crowd doesn't care me. But when they lift that ar an extra inch or two and tell ou it's above the record height, it's to encouragement offered by his father, who (.caches manual train- ing at, Flushing high school. After George, Jr.. had outgrown his homemade jumping .sticks, his fa- ther came home one afternoon with a. regular sot of standards. It was, to George Jr., about the finest pres- ent he had ever received. OLYMPIC HOPEFULS SHATTER RECORDS IN WEEKEND MEET Gene Venzke, George Spitz and Emmett Toppino Ac- count for These Bril- liant Performances (By Herbert. W. Barker, Associated Press Sports Writer) New figures tell the story of a determined pre-Olym- pic charge by America's track and field aces here over the two world indoor marks smashed and another tied. Three Venzke, George Spitz and Emmett Toppino of when the last Olym- pics were run off at Amsterdam in 1928, accounted for these brilliant performances. Venzke. a formidable runner only since last year, flashed Wana- the Mill rose A. A. 1-5, shaving four- maker mile of games in fifths of a second off the indoor mark held jointly by Paavo Nurmi and Joie Ray. It was the third best mile in track history, indoors or out. Surpassing it is the 2-5 hung up by Nurmi outdoors in 1923 and Jules BOBSLEDDERS HOLD STAGE DURING WEEK FOR THEOLYMPICS The 1932 Internationa! Win- ter Games Are About One- Third Completed at Lake Placid Lake Placid, N. storm of snow and wind, raging over the Adirondacks today forced postpone- ment for a day of the two-man bob- sleigh race, feature event of the fifth day of the 1932 winter Olym- pics. 1-5 set at Pans last standard of sunlmer- BETTERS OWN MARK Spitz, America's chief hope (.By Edward J. Neil. Associated Press Sports Writer) Lake Placid, N. 1932 winter Olympics rounded the first third of the course today, leaving argument behind and protests over- shadowed as the men who play the most dangerous game in the world, the bob sledders of eight nations, pitted chilled steel nerves against the perils of treacherous Mount Van Hoevenberg. There were other things on the packed program of the fifth day of the international conflict, but none could compare for thrills, glamor and the possibility of sudden death with the breathless sport that has grown from the youngsters' pastime of sliding down hill. In the Olympic arena, comfort- ably housed on a flawless sheet of glassy ice, the men's figure skating champions of eight nations, among them Karl Schaefer. of Austria, world champion, and his rival. Gil- lis Grafstrom of Sweden, Olympic title holder, gathered for the start Two of the three games in the Major Municipal league played in the High school gymnasium Satur- day evening were of a hangup brand of basketball. In one of them. Sac- red Heart managed to squeeze an 18 to 17 win from Philakeans and take that team out of a tie for first place while they climbed into sec- ond themselves. Kitz Pfeil were hard pressed to win, 17 to 15, from Public Service. It kept their slate clean and con- tinued them in first place alone. They had shared the lead with Philakeans. In the other game, Parker's had little difficulty in de- feating B'Gosh, 30 to 9. TAKE EARLY LEAD In the Philakean-Sacred Heart game. Philakeans led at the end of the first quarter, 6 to 3. Sacred Heart was ahead at the half, 9 to 6. and lead, 16 to 11, at the third quarter. Kitz Pfeil and Public Service each had 2 at the end of the first quarter. Kitz Pfeil led at the half. 6 to 3. and at the end of the third period were one point ahead, 11 to 10. The box scores: SACRED HEART (18) FG FT PF C. Spanbauer. rf......... 0 0 0 Sonnleitner, rf...........5 1 0 Kloiber. If...............101 L. Spanbauer, c.......... 1 0 1 Beck, rg.................0 0 0 Herrle, rg...............0 0 0 _Miller, Ig................ l l ij Totals 8 2 3 PHILAKEAN (17) FG FT PF if there were any Olympic prizes for beauty there is little doubt Unclf Sam's fair skaters would carry off the honors with case. Here is a sextette of our girl figure skaters at Lake Placid, N. Y., all dressed up in their Olympic uniforms ready to do their stuff for their Uncle Samuel. Front, left to right: Audrey Peppe, Louise Wigel and Mar- garet Bennett In. the rear are Mrs. F. W. Blanchard, Marabel Vinsos ___________ and Beatrix Loaghran. Best of luck, girls SKOLE'S PLAY HOME AGAINST FONDY FIVE Game is Slated Tuesday Badger Team Wins 78 to 22 in BADGER STATE LEAGUE W Kennedy, rf....... Hill, If..................0 Billmeyer. c.............5 Magnusen, rg............ 1 Friday, Ig............... 1 ard to keep from tightening the high jump championship in the ve seen good jumpers fall a foot j coining own elow their best jump." ______ WORKS OUT SYSTEM With no one to teach him in hi; I indoor record by five-eighths of an at 6 ,1 when he cleared the bar inches, t'oppino. rapidly developing into ackyard days, the tall, black-haired one of the greatest sprinters in the system that he j gamo. turned the 60 yards in G 2-10 seconds, equalling the record set suited him. It's a combination the old "western where the bv Loren Murchison nncl since ead goes over first, and the scis- equalled by several others. of their fancy maneuvers. i IX lo'.OOO METERS I Out at the Olympic stadium eight for speed skaters. Valentine Bailis. Irv- ing Jaffee, Edwin Wedge, and Ed- ward Schroeder of the United States forces. Alex Hurd and Frank Stack of Canada, and the Norwegians, Ivar Ballangrud and Bernt Evensen. twice chosen amid a storm of argu- ment and protest for the final of the 10.000 meters race, last of a men's speed skating series faced nothing more dangerous than a cold ors. Where e average jumper Aj[ three probablv will be out- r i-_i____._[ Totals KITZ PFEIL Weitz. rf........ Wishlinski, If............ o G. Schuerman, c......... 2 H. Schuerman, If........ 1 (17) FG FT PF Lautenschlager. rg. 1 Heidi, Ig................. o Totals 6 PUBLIC SERVICE (15) FG FT PF Krohn. rf...............2 2 Dustman, if............. 1 Remington, c............0 E. Barsch. rg............. 3 H. Barsch, Ig-............ 0 L 0 2 3 2 3 3 Skole's 5 Menasha. 2 Appleton 2 Fond du Lac....... 1 Genal's 1 New London 1 Last Week's Scores Skole's 36; New London 28. Appleton 30; Genal's 25. Tuesday's Games Fond du Lac vs. Skole's. Genal's at 'Menasha. New London at Appleton. Pet. 1.000 .500 .500 .333 .250 .250 Skole's. of Oshkosh, leading the Badger State league, expect a hard game tomorrow night on St. Vin- cent's floor against Fond du Lac. as in a previous game, Oshkosh won by a close Fond du Lac will have Boyle and will be determined to tie for second place if possible. The visitors also will have a new center. A fast prc- ALL NEW LEADERS IN STATE PIN MEET That is, With the Exception o the All-Events Division, Held by Wais Kenosha. leaders appeared in every division excepl the all events in Wisconsin's 30th annual bowling tournament todaj after some consistent rolling by oui of town teams. The Arcade five of Fond du Lac went into first place in the five man event with 2.904. while the Clown Cigarets of Milwaukee took seconc place with The Madison team of Siewet- Kleinheinz captured first in the doubles division, with games total- ing Only one pin behind are Rudd and Nowacysky, Milwaukee. W. Wais of La Crosse was replaced as singles leader by H. A. Rose of Sheboygan who bowled 745. Wais, however, remains on top in the all events with The leaders. FIVE-MAX Arcade. Fond du Lac Clown Cigarets, Milw. Gazettes. Janesville liminary game is to be played at 8 Hip's Colts. Milw. Totals 6 3 7 PARKER'S (30) FG FT PF Friday, rf...............6 Barteis. If...............4 Lehr, c.................. 1 Davis, rg................3 Jorgensen, Ig............0 0 Totals .................14 2 2 B'GOSH (9) FG FT PF wind. There were exhibition speed races 3 (gets in one 'kick tor he .caves .standing favorites in iheir special-! between the women stars of Canada 1 George uses two. ties when tho National Indoor A. A. j and United States and a resumption lj Ihat.s how he geus those- extra j u. championships are held bore Feb. j of the hockey battles that Canada few Inches that make him a chain- Tot P. H. I. (12) FG FT PF Sosinski, rf 3 2 0 Tcss, if 0 n o Sohnvride. c l l 4 rg, c 0 o 3 Lange. rg u i o Chri.v.rr.an. Je 0 0 2 Ellinp style. Like :no.s: George can nac i Toppino beat Ira Singer, the j so far has dominated, but nowhere lljPion. He goes over backward, his national 60-yard champion, among was the prospect equal to that out 'head always higher than his hips, j others on Saturday ni-ht. conch at N. Y. U.. Emil Von I tried to alter hi.s Th? first man to suffer the death iprnaiiy by eiertrcciuion in tho state spor: champions, iof New York William Kenunler. rllat rise a lo: of his success who was executed (J. 1890. P.VINES Lauicni-.ehiaser. r: J.ook. ri" A. Wdsancf. if. c W. Weiganclt, U Spierine. c Krorniu-r. rg Habie. rg Langiiiz. Ig KG FT 0 0 4 PF Olympian's Treasure House "L, ELMER'S 1241 Einncr. Ducx, l: FT Scott, c WoUrath. r Me Wright. Hammond. Wright. Ig Totals ..............10 BEERNTSEN i G Pommeraning. rf V. Hoffman, if 4 Patt, c l c 0 Vuiglit. rg O. Hoffman. Ig........ 0 Hitschke, Ig 0 JOHN'S Pause, rf Schroeder. if Swencison, If Dingcr. c Safford. I'ft N. H. Schfoi.'ky, Iff i IXI FG 3 I 0 FT n u IT 1 1 0 n o i o 0 on the side of Mt. Van Hoevenberg. For the past week or 10 days, the bobbers have been challenging the mountain's icy slopes, the curves vertically, walls of ice. j down grades that shoot the 500 j pound steel and oak sleds into the 120 curves at speeds sometimes as high as 75 miles an hour. FEW ESCAPE MISHAPS Many times the sleds have crashed, in fact scarcely a man on the course evaded some kind of an accident. And in the hospital, out i of danger but still battered lie Capt. Fritz Grau and Albert Brehme. of the German sled that crashed ihrough Shady corner going 70 an hour last Tuesday. That was in practice, when there i was no particular premium on speed. Today the race itself started between two-man bobsleds of Aus- tria. Belgium. France. Germany, Italy. Roumania. Switzerland and the United StAtes. and the time really had come to take chances. Potratz, rf............... 1 Quandt, If.............. 3 Taylor, c................. 0 Pugh. rg................ 0 Wendlancl, rg............ 0 Hausen. Ig.............. o Totals................. 4 WINS RACINE MEET THREE SEEK HONORS IN BIG TEN SCORING Toiaii mnrr of two Olympic ice skating ohampionfhips, the SOO-mctcr and rvrnt. ,Wk Shea, of the United Sutos tram, is shown at nome m Lake Piacid, N. Y., m the room where he keeps his troDhics.  omg to get there, even if you throw blizzard and an avalanche in ou- ace. He's the best lead dog in Alaska, and that's saying plenty." I told him how more than a. few xjople considered that 1925 diph- hena dash to Nome something more than a publicity stunt. "Publicity stunt, eh? Well, it ould take a pretty crazy sort of uy to hit out over a 200-mile trail the thermometer down to 40 r oO below, and it snowing so hard ou couldn't see the lead dog a'! or a little publicity. "Let me tell you "something. Mv aughter was the first person ir- onic to go down with diphtheria nd when I set out for the scrum emg brought down from Fairbanks V relays, I wasn't thinking abou: ubhcity. Hell. I couldn't even SDC" word then." The most expensive animal in zoos or menageries is the Indian rhinoceros. The difficulty in cap- luring this animal a-.irt keeping ir. olive makes it cost from U> ,'SPAPERf   

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