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Oshkosh Daily Northwestern Newspaper Archive: October 29, 1903 - Page 1

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Publication: Oshkosh Daily Northwestern

Location: Oshkosh, Wisconsin

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   Oshkosh Daily Northwestern (Newspaper) - October 29, 1903, Oshkosh, Wisconsin                                The Daily Northwestern. SECOND O'CLOCK, OSHKOSH, THURSDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 29, x9o3.-TEN PAGES. PRICE TWO CEWTlt IRS. BOOTH mm IS KILLED IN WRECK. FOLK CAMS OX A SA.VI'A FK THAIS UUM.tlLUU AT MO., AMU HIKT. ONLY ONE HAS DIED THUS FAR. The Dri-prtufd Won the of the Kuuiitler the Snltittlon With Her HiMbHHd Ileen at the llend of the OnritnlKtttlon In Coun- "Wan Her 'Wny Frum Culv- rmlo to of the A-j- in tin Ac- count of Invlntlvn. Kansas City, Mo., Oct. Km- ma Booth Tucker, consul in America of the Salvation Army, wife Of Com- mander Booth Tucker and second daughter of "Wjllianl Booth, founder of the Army, was killed m the -wreck of the east bound California- train No 2 near Dean Lake, Mo., eighty-five miles east of Kansas City, at 10 o'clock last eight. Col. Thomas C. Holland, in charge ef the Salvation Army at Amity, Col., was fatally injured, but up to 3 30 this morning -nas reported still alive. Fifteen others were more or less seri- ously hurt The dead and injured iveie taken to Fort Madison, la.. Mrs. Tucker was rendered uncon- scious and died -nithin half an hour after being injured. Her skull was fractured and she was Injured inter- nally. She was on her way from a visit to the colony at Amity, to Chicago she was to have met her hua- I toand today. XETVS TRAVELS SLOWLY. Although the wreck occurred at 9 30 fast night it was not known until after CZAR WRITES LOUBET. The C'onn-rnlnlatrd am Ar- bitral Inn (By Associated Press.) Paris. Oct. The Russian foieijrn minister. Count .Lumsdoi ff. and M. Delcaswe, the minister for foieign af- fans of France, -went together to Ver- sailles this inoinmg ana spent most of the day theie in conference They ic- turned heie late in the afternoon and attended the jtianU dinner at the palace, given ii, honor of the statesman. Although the gen- eial :mpi c-bsion continues that Count L.unsdoiff's to in the and far east, the Associated Press has reason to know that the au- togiaph letter of the czar which Count Larndoiff piesented to President Lou- bet specifically disc-logos that one of the chief causes of the visit is the purpose to expiess the giatification of the czar at the recent couise of France in ex- TO tending- peace. the cause of international MRS. BOOTH-TICKER. EdPLOYERSTOFORI UNION, DELEGATES MEET AT CHICAGO FOR PIKI'OSK OF CREATING PEDERATIOV. The Conference Will Lnat Twn at the Knd of Thnt Period Orarnnlintlon Will Hnve Ef- Strike nt Chicago. (By Associated Press Chicago, 111., Oct executive board of the packing council and the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butchers' Workmen of America held a conference today and It IB said that a recommendation for a general strike in all packing centers of the country was decided upon. Ttfe result of today's meeting will be submitted to the special meeting which was scheduled for Saturday night, but which is now said may be held tomor- row evening. TIIK HKADUH9 THKRKOF ARK SAID TO UK IX COM--KHKM.K AT CITV OK MILWAI KKU. Whnt Cream City Uemuvrntlu Jomr- nl to vf the Unlherliiw nnd the Thnt Led Spouuer In f Special to The Northwestern.) Milwaukee, AVK Oct. 29 Jour- nal today Whatever of politics in opposition to Governor La Follette Is to be decided on by Wisconsin Stal- warts may be decided on today. After today the leaders are not likely to again meet together in thH state until special and rejrular san.Moti of the POSTER STARTS RUN. Hit it- With. that Mrs Tucker was among f0fe injured. The flrst details of the were obtained this morning by the Associated Press over the long dis- tance telephone from Marceline through Dr. D. B. Putnam, who had been at the Ecene. The wrecked train, left Kansas City last evening It ran into an open BW itch just outside of Dean Lake. Onlv the three last cars, two Pullmans and a diner, were wrecked. The Pullmans were completely demolished while the diner was badly damaged In the forward Pullman. Mrs Booth Tucker and Colonel Holland, who were the sole occupants of that car, had just gone to the forward end for a consulta- tion. Two of the Pullmans struck a eteel water tank with such force as to move it feet from its foundation and. when the train crew reached the ecene. both Mrs Tucker and Colonel Holland werejound unconscious. They with the other injured w-ere. af- ter much delay, taken to the depot w here ever} thing possible was done for them. Neither regained consciousness and within half an hour the noted Sal- vation Army leader succumbed to her Injuries. CARJXG FOR VICTIMS. For a lime it was belieied that the unconscious man at her side was Com- mander Booth Tucker and in the con- fusion this report was spread. "Wreck- Ing trains were sent from Marceline and other points and the dead and in- jured started for Fort Madison. la The train broke down after going a short distance and Mnrocline. the next sta- tion. not reached until 2 o'clock in the morning. Physicians were taken on at Marceline and the train proceed- ed north. Mrs. Tucker left Kansas City last evening and was to meet Commander Booth Tucker, her husltand. at Chica- go. today. The first news that the noted army worker had been hurt was received in this city at o'clock morning, when It was Mated had been fatally Injured and had died at JO o'clock last nlfht. This of tier death, however, proved premature it later developed that she did not euccumb to her injuries until this Just ns the train bringing the Injur-d to MarceJine reached that place. The wrecked train irns east California Xo. 2. which left Xan- tas City evening at o'clock for Chicago. It ran Into an openfns switch. striking the steel water tank ami all fcavc to" mall, express and day wrecked. Mrs. Booth Tut-ker ami Mr. Holland were In one of the Pall- mans. Chicago, 111, Oct. conference for the purpose of forming a national federation of employers to cope among other things with labor problems be- gan at Klmball hall today. Delegates representing rational trade oiganiza- tions of the country were present at the opening session The conference will last two by which time it is expected a constitution and bylaws will be adopted, work of or- ganization planned, scheme of revenue decided one and permanent officers named. SOME DELEGATES. Among those already here are D. M. Parrj of Indianapolis, president of the National Manufacturers' association, J. W. Van Cleave, John Kirby Jr, presi- dent of the Dayton, O.. Emplojers' as- sociation; E F. De Brul. Cincinnati, of the National Metal trades. Marshal Gushing, New York, secretary of the National Manufacturers' association, E O Hornbrooke of the Kansas City Employers' association: J. C. Craig of the Citizens' Alliance of Demer, J. W. Hodges representing Detroit employers, and C. X Chafiwlck and James T. Holle, representing the employers of New York. F. TV. Job, secretary of the Chicago Emploi ers' association called the meet- ing to order and John Van Cleve of St ixiuie was elected temporary chairman. A.. C. Mart-hall, of Dayton, O-, was named as temporary secretary. Mr A'an Cleve In stating the purpose of the gathering said he hoped means would be devised to bring to a successful Issue queetlons, which he said, were injuring the cause of manufacturers. The work of the convention was pro- ceeding when a delegate objected to any action being taken until all the delegate were accredited, persons ob- jectionable to the employers having found present A credential com- mittee was then named. CANKERS OUT. Chicago, 111 Oct house canners walked out today joining the striking sausage makers and increasing the number of idle men at the stock- yards to 2 400 There are sixteen other branches of organized labor In the packing houses yet to make and more than 32 000 employes are said to stand ready to support the strikers. HUNDREDS LAID OFF Chicago. 111., Oct. hun- dred brickmakere have been laid off in Cook county and when their pay were told that there could be no more work until late next spring. Four hun- dred will be dlsdharjred In December and the industry In this district will be closed down. The prevalence of and the In- creased cost of building in Chicago has practically stopped ail construction work. ended Congressman. Babcock leaies Milwaukee tonlg-ht for West Ba- den, and will go from there to Wash- ington as soon as he Is able. He lias been ill for a week and has been under treatment by a physician. Senator Spooner wag In Milwaukee Wednesday night and left at H a. m Thursday for Chicago. He wag at eon'm house over night and had a conference with Senator Quarles and Congressman Bab- cock "Joe" Farr and others were also present. Mr Spooner it wag reported, had gone to Chicago to eee the railway people to their Interests In the cam- paign and in Senator Quarles THE MEETING. appeared at the Hotel shortly before ten o'clock today and af- ter greeting Congressman Babcock, State Senator A L Krutzer. M. C. Ring and Emanuel Philips, he w ent In- to earnest conference with Wlllard Van 13mnt, It IB understood that before any of these men he had had a. conference with Charles F Pfliter. Mr. Spooner WOK not in best of humor and Congressman Babcock would have been less genial if he had not felt so 111. He was too weak to be ill-natured Congressman Babcock thinks that Stalwarts are not making speed enough and Senator Spooner is not pleased be- cause he has been urged to take such steps as will accelerate the forward movement. It Is constantly upon both, the rumor Is, that Governor La Follette is warping his ship nearer and nearer to a safe mooring and is drilling: his crew, while the Stalwart craft is drifting, and idleness Is de- stroying the discipline. An effort to do something-, it Is said is the leason of the political gathering- in Milwaukee Leadership must be established before the winter set1! in and the loose ends must be picked up during the long nights to come QUARLES' VIEW. Senator Quarles. It is is not anxious as some people to have Sena- tor Spooner speak out. That he-.fearo the Stalw arts ae much as lie does the Half Breeds and sees small hopes with either. Senator Quarles had a. talk with Congressman Babcock at the Hotel Pflster Wednesday followed by a aec- ond at his office later in the day. Congressman Cooper of Racine, who has been expected in Milwaukee for R. week, has failed to appear. Senator Hagemelster of Green Bay was one of the Milwaukee political group Wednesday POLITICAL, TRICK. Milwaukee. Wis Oct 28 special to The Journal from Madison gays: Madi- son Stalwarts say that the statement by the administration that this is the firet year in the state's hictor> that a. tax has not been levied for ctate government expenses and for 'state institutions Is A political trick of Governor La Follette. They claim that there was no eucu tax in the four years or Governor Rusk and in the two years of Governor ScoSeld. and also m one jear of Governor Peck'e ad- ministration. JONES WILL NOT RUN. (By Barnsboro, Pa., Get mlno have a run on the principal banking InMii.jtioiu, because of which Jiuu Ulsjil.iM-d prominently about town Tho blllx Mild something about b.mk Uoubl'w the foreigners anked no -iiuim but hur- riedly withdrew their oa-1> plaueU it with coal operators it back to the bank In their d< so that the run caused no PEACH AT SI' LOUIS' St. LouU, Mo., Oct round of the trunt company office inado toJav alter leu o'clock, the hour of nlng, tliowod that matters had their noinial aspect- Plucks that nt.ru Msjerd.n bc- Bieged by to  epeechee, crying: "Down with the employment offices THE RUSH. crowd thereupon rushed from the bulldlnc and about swept Into the rue du Chateau De Au, wnere formid- able barrier of police had drawn up. The remainder crowded to the place de Republlque and the Magenta, Ringing revolutionary longa A lieutenant of police and six men ad- vanced for the purpose of an-eftlng the singers, who resisted, and were by the crowd. A free tight followed, but the rioters gave way before a charge of the police. The manlfestante then entered cafes and chops, eelzed gluasea tables and chalra, and renewed the struggle. Another section of the rioters also at- tacked the police. While the fighting In progress, members of the Bourse de etood at thf> windows of that building encourag- ing the rioters. As a. result of the fighting between the police and rioters, -three police- men Injured, eeven of them serious- ly, and a number of rioters were wound- ed. JTjftj arrests were made. Seeks to Establish Wifehood. have made entrv of 'VERT SUSPICIOUS. Bo far as is known no of fraud has been discovered In these spe- cific cases, but the officials of the de- partment contend that in -view of the fact that oxer MOO is reousred to com- plete the acquisition o' title under the timber arid etone law some of these entries are at least suspiciou5. In other cases. entriec been made in the names of fictitious per- sons. The connivanc" of officials is necessary in this char- acter and this line of lend them- selves most easily to and prosecution. It aleo that the frauds extend eastwarc I'-om the coast slates into Idaho. Molit.-i a -inu Nevada. PRIEST IS COMPLAINANT. PROTECTS HIS ASSAILANT. OMRO MAN TAKES A BRIDE. Sir. F. J. ttnbnr M. Rnrke Mnrrled. (Special to The Cean Ijike. the the -wreck. h< an place and there delay In taklnc care of the Sn- for had finally it m-as   Associated Press) Bprcelona. Spain. Ort 150.000 in other industries here have joined the glass workers on strike. Bilbao. Spain. Oct. strikers are threatening to attack the Galdaccano dynamite factory. A large force has been sent to protect the works. Bilbao, Spain, Oct. garrison of Bilbao hog been reinforced, bfct the troops ha-ve difficulty with the rioting strik- ers, who constantly erect new barricades ns the old once are torn down bv the sol- diers. The city presents a sorry owing to the widespread wrought by the The rioters iispd Ijnatnlte in several instances to How In he doors of the Jesuit houses and to de- (By Now Tork, Oct. 19 tne trial Sam Parks, the walking delegate who In accused of extortion, was resumed toda It was learned that the ball bond o for Tlra McCarthy, Parka" partne In the labor union who Is Jointly Indicte with him. had been forfeited J. I, Byrne, nephew of ex-Chief of Police TV1I liam 3. is the bondsman. At th request of Assistant District Attornej Rand the forfeiture of the bond will no be entered till tomorrow. According to Mr. Rand. Mr. McCarthy la expected to appear within the next houra. bat whether he will be produced by bondsmen or apprehended by th police the official  Evangelical churoli at the Sons of Hermann hall te large crowds. Last evenang a program was presented. Beside choir, taking !n were "W, C. ret-rsan. Prof. R. MIJW ft. Kvff, Mrc. R, Nachtrab. IJW v, Kbo-rt, Harry Horn and K.Hab- tended with years of awe, She a hwlnnd two chiMren. The at oVIocfc from on Merrttt Aftrl Prnfc Nw -___--- j ,i J( 1 Ni-M'SPAPFRl   

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