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Neenah Menasha Northwestern Newspaper Archive: January 3, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Neenah Menasha Northwestern

Location: Oshkosh, Wisconsin

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   Neenah-Menasha Northwestern (Newspaper) - January 3, 1974, Oshkosh, Wisconsin                               Edition of the Oshkosh Daily Northwestern Associated Press, United Press International c l 106th Oshkosh, Wis., Thursday, January 3; 1974 24 Pages 154 Faithful ffock to churches despite Suridals -l _ 0 By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS samnlino- nf rhnrr-hps in 17 "Fnr PRESS -They come by foot, on bi- cycles and in car pools. They nation's faith- and church leaders say they are flocking to worship services despite Gasless Sun- days. the onset of the energy crisis, some religious leaders feared parishioners would not use up costly fuel to go to church... But .an Associated Press sampling of in 17 showed attendance had not been adversely affected in surveyed. Eight "areas reported increased at- tendance, eight were not af- fected and only one had a drop. "Since we had Gasless Sun- day, our-attendance has been said Rev. Carl Wiedi- ger, pastor of St. John's Lu- theran Church in New Britain, Conn. "For the want of some- where else to go, people are coming to church." The Rev. Dr. Robert W. Scott of Westminister Presby- terian Church in Elizabeth, N.J., said Gasless Sundays have more people at home this year because they didn't drive to vacations or second homes" during holi- days. The Jlev. D. Robertson of St. Luke's United Methodist Church in Jackson County, Mo., said figures show a rise in attendance since Dec. 2 over the same pe- riod last year. The Rev. Raymond Bal- comb, pastor of the First Methodist Church of Portland, Ore., says he's seen no marked change in attendance 'but is watching closely. A decrease in attendance was reported in .the Maryland suburbs of Washington, D.C. Our Lady of Lourdes in Bethesda said normal attend- ance of has dropped off at least 500 on the average. But churches and syna- gogues have not completely escaped the energy crisis mainly because the houses of worship are often heavy users of heating oil arid electricity.- ,-Many religious leaders con- tacted said thermostats had been lowered, some meetings switched from evening to day- time, lighting displays turned off and church-related travel by car or bus curtailed. Methods of getting to church also are changing. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints urged the world's Mormons to walk to church, while other churches have urged increased use of mass transit and even bi- cycles. The energy crisis is increas- ingly a topic of sermons, church periodicals and even campaigns" as tp stress moral power. "These are times when we niust stress "spiritual 'vahle'sV" and reshape pur living to show 'it is not made up of just material said the Rev. Robert J. Mar- shall of New York City, presi- dent of the Lutheran Church in America. Gasoline prices climbing upward I WASHINGTON (AP) Energy chief William E. Sim- on said today that oil com- panies and independent dis- tributors have agreed to set a limit of 10 gallons of gasoline per customer at service sta- tions. Simon also predicted that gasoline prices will increase over the next month or two, to levels about 8 to 11 cents high- er than jn early December. Simon told a news confer- ence his price estimates, in- creased from his estimate-of about seven cents last week, took account of a new set of gasoline price hikes to be au- thorized Feb. L Simon said the new increas- es would come as a variable formula designed to give serv- ice station ownersr- partial compensation for the reduced agreement with "the' dis- tributors marks a further of con- trols, although still on a vol- untary basis. Simon-said major oil com- panies and- independent .dis- tributors and retailers have agreed to encourage a policy limiting service gaso- lines may discourage-this tac- tic. Simon reported that gaso- line consumption jwas running some 7.8 per cent-below_nor- mal demand forecasts over the four weeks ending Dec. 21. This was an improvement in fuel, per cent reported the week' ear- lier, but still far short of. the 20 per cent gasoline" reduction okay Looking for trouble a 1 1 runways .at. the sons in a in precautions last month. Wirephoto- Nixon to boost in benefits SAN CLEMENTE Despite some misgivings Nixon is ready to sign into law an 11 per cent increase in Social Security benefits. Although Nixon was; known to feel that the. timing of-the hikes would have -an, adverse effect_ on the" federal rbudget, Jaids indicated-he-.would.-sign the'imeasure line-sales to 10 gallons-per amounts of gasoline they can. customer. sell, as gasoline production is _-_He said the companies could -now believed" necessary, ,he cut under federal regulations, enforce-, this as company said. Simon has already ordered licy at the service stations It creation of a standby gasoline__owns directly but could only rationing program but has de- ferred until later a decision whether to put it into effect. He.has also asked the public to limit its gasoline purchases voluntarily to 10 gallons per- weelc. Today's announcement of Talks continue Simon said-several factors" would combine to-push aver- urge it -upon franchised serv- age gasoline prices even high- _ ice.stations. The sales enforced, would still leave a motorist er than previously "predicted over the next several weeks. One obvious factor is. the re- free to drive on and purchase cent round of steep price in- WASHINGTON -ip another 10 gallons at the next creases on foreign oil, led by Howard Hunt, mVttM'fale. of-'Showingc-the'" effects-c service station, as gaso- line-supplies_ dwindle, waiting Arab oil late last montht" CAP) An woman and two" men .arrested here for arms smuggling belonged" to an extremist student group headquartered, at Santa Bar- bara, Calif., security sources said today. The woman, who-was ar- rested-at a London airport arms smuggling plot 18--will stand "trial or, be de- hoped to nab. more accom- ported.__ arriving-from.-Los-An- But the sources said the FBI ,geles. But only the Pakistani is seeking-two other "students flew uT anyjbth- in the United States, who can-" celed a trip to London after the arrests here. A decision on whether the three will stand trial in Brit- ain or be deported to the Saturday when customs offi- -United States will probably be cials found guns and determined on political tion in her luggage, was iden- tified U.S. .Embassy as Allison 'Thompson of .Santa Barbara.- The identified by sources as' Atler Naseen, 21, of Pakistan, and Abelkhir Hakabui, 25, of-Morocco, both previously, involved in student politics in'Santa Barbara. The. sources said Hakaoui was the leader "of the group which apparently planned to attack Moroccan diplomats or property after gathering in London. There was no appar- ent link with known Arab sources said. Scotland Yard has imposed a security blackout on the declining even to offi- cially identify the three pend- ing a decision on whether they grounds. .For fear of reprisals, ain has sometimes shied away .from putting suspected guer- rillas on trial. The group was discovered was amid a national security alert for' Arab terrorists- who were" believed planning a concerted attack against targets in Brit- ain. The woman arrived "at Heat- hrow Airport Saturday on a flight from Los Angeles car- rying five machine pistols and 150 rounds of ammunition in her luggage, police said. Scot- land Yard had been tipped off by United States officials, but they delayed their arrest until she contacted the Moroccan. A Yard spokesman said the ers were warned away. The assistant manager of "Mr. a Santa .Bar- bara restaurant where Miss Thompson worked for a year, said she was fired because her friendship with an Arab man about 30 years old was inter- fering with lierrwork. Ben Crawford said he be- lieved'the woman was born in Santa Barbara and' had been reared either there or some- place in Oregon. "She never discussed poli- tics or international affairs." Crawford-said. "I got the im- pression the only thing she was interested in was fash- ions. She seemed to be in the drifting category." British authorities believe the-weapons the woman brought were intended for more attacks like the one Sun- day night on Jewish million- aire Joseph E. Sieff. There was also speculation the group may have planned to assassi- arrests were kept secret until riate -King Hassan, the pro- Wednesday because detectives Western ruler of Morocco. Drive to apply antitrust standards to media starts objections. -JJixon had to act on it would die by pocket veto.- The bill would increase the -average monthly payment for a- retired individual to and for a couple from to THe'-President signed a -riumberfof major bills Wednesday, including a billion defense appropriations act: This was billion-less than the administration had requested. The bulk of the re- duction billion was in procurement funds appro- priated at billion. Nixon also signed a bill in- creasing by million the total amount of loans and guarantees that the Small Business Administration can make before June 30. The same measure retroactively re-opens the Agriculture De- partment's easy-term loan program for rural residences damaged in disasters that oc- curred between Dec. 26, 1972 and April 20, 1973. Finally, Nixon signed legis- lation to encourage state adop- tion of maximum state speed limits of 55 miles per hour and to reorganize seven bank- rupt Northeastern railroads with the help of million in federal subsidies and billion in loan guarantees: The Social Security legisla- tion also raises the wage base the amount of annual earn- ings subject to lax from of 1973 to in 1974. Under previous law, it was scheduled to be in 1974. The maximum tax paid each by the worker and employer in 1973, will be in 1974. The 5.85 per cent rate paid months inZprison-for the tergate free "he HunKwas day, eejfasked "wheth- Egyptian and Israeli gotiators at the-Middle East peace talks in Geneva are ex: pected to-reach an agreement on crucial troop -withdrawals by the end of the month, U.S. administration officials said today.: The officials at the Western White House in ,said the peace talks _ w- take a_-jnonth to' six agree- ment is reached. The" "disclosure followed" "an" announcement by "the- peace negotiators- Geneva" that they have jreached impor- tant stage" in the withdrawal the battle "frfints yn uie udiue iroius, israeupjga in ad clashes alnnP thP said clashes along_ the J tian and Syrian Wednesday produced prison In-lrlonda" v Conference officials said the H said -Defense Minister Moshe Dayan jirquld" fly "to Washing- ton for talks fetafy of State Hen_ry .A" "I find- it-very- encouraging t the ___________ __ have reached of negotiators are consulting singer on the Egyptian and Israeli negotia- with their governments on the ence. Jhe talks will center-on newsmen" after going- throyghT progress in the talks. The offi- troop piillbacks. _ tne formalities of pledging-he cials said both sides must get Egyptian Foreign" abide conditions set-by their government's Ismail Fahmi was scheduled the court. before finalizing an agreement to fly to Moscow win. the. He also thanked "the manjr tors trying to decide how- many-miles should separate their forces along the Suez Canal. The officials said of a full on the pullbacks. middle of the month. Astronauts say space trip changing outlook on life HOUSTON (UPI) Two that it's going to increase my members_pf the Skylab 3 crew awareness. That's going to be admitted? Wednesday their a major effect on my inner space flight has significantly self." changed the way they look at "Pogue said he caused em- life and will make them better barrassment to his fellow thousands of icans who have sent jne" tele- grams and letters over these long months." -He has made my incarceration far more bearable." I-IT Hunt was reunited with his four- children who live_in nearby Potomac, Md. His release and the expected release of Barker wouldTleave _f 1 -il i-t' r-j, gross and now he's trying to perform as-a human being "within the limitations I four of the original Watergate possess." _ defendants s_till Jn prison, Gibson said orbiting the three of whom- could 'beLre- earth "makes you speculate a leased soon either by parole human beings. crewmen the first few days of little more" about life existing board action or appeals court Astronauts Gerald P. the flight when they tried to elsewhere in the universe. order. Edward G. Gibson and Wil- liam R. Pogue took time to re- cover up his being ill. He Iried to work even harder to "You realize the universe is Eugenio R. MartinezT quite big and just the number .gilio R. Gonzalez and of possible combinations that A. Sturgis, who pleaded guilty fleet on the effect the flight make up for that, he said, but has had on their lives during ended up making errors be- you can have out there which with Hunt and Barker last Wednesday's day off. But the cause he was trying to move can create life enters your January, already have served astronauts were back on their regular research plan today, galhering dala on the Earth and Comet Kohoutek. Both Carr, the 41-year-old mission commander, and Pogue, 43, the pilot said dur- ing a televised news confer- ence from space thai Ihe di- reclion of their lives was being affected by their planned 84-day space flight "People in our line of work, a very technical type of work. too quickly. "I finally came to the real- ization that Fm a fallible hu- man being." Pogue said. "I now have a new orientation of almost a spiritual nature, and my attitude toward life is go- ing to change. "I think I see myself in a much more realis'Jf And when I see other people. 1 try to sec as operating human entities and to fit my- self into a human situation in- mind and makes it seem much more he said. more than their one-year sentence. minmum Fair tonight Fair and colder tonight with overnight lows near zero. Details on page 2. Inside WASHINGTON (AP) The Nixon administration has launched a drive to get the Federal Communications Com- mission to apply antitrust standards to newspaper own- ership of broadcast stations. In petitions filed Wednesday opposing-renewal of broadcast licenses held by publishers in St. Louis and Des Moines, the Justice Department argued that "promotion or com- petitive conditions in the dis- semination of news and adver- tising" should be an impor- tant objective In FCC licens- ing decisions. The department said renew- al of the St Louis and Des Moines licenses "would be in- consistent with the public in- terest since the renewal would perpetuate the high degree of concentration." Broadcast licenses must be renewed every three years. Many major daily newspapers also own radio and television stations. The petition estimated the two publishing firms receive approximately SO per cent of the advertising revenue 5n the St Louis area. It called the situation "conlrary to antil- The Justice Department 
                            

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