Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Jeffersonian Democrat (Newspaper) - September 4, 1856, Monroe, Wisconsin                               State anfc ganmtait Glorious (Due anfc VOLUME 1. MONROE, GREEN CO., WIS., THURSDAY, SEP'R 4, 1856. NUMBER 4, C DEMOCRAT THCIUDAY MORNING, BY GEO. C. BAKER. in the J Empire East side of the Public Sq-iart, Monroe, Green Co., Wis. TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION I'eiriv. xnvariably in advance 50 ilAlf v, 75 We icsrr: for the benefit of those interested, the laws enacted in relation to subscribers 1. Subscribers who do not Rive express notice to the contrary, arc considered as wishing to cojjtsn-ie their" subscriptions. If E.ibscribers order their paper discontin- ued. publishers nay continue to send them till ell arrearases are pi'id. 3. If neglect or refuse to take their papers from the office or place to they L-es-it. tlisv arc held responsible until they their give notice to discontinue If subscribers remove to other places with- out informms tlu publisher, and the paper is lent to the former direction, the publisher is responsible. fry Postmasters would oblige, by a strict fuhHucut of the regulation requiring them to no ifv publishers, once in three months, of pa- pers "not taken from their offices by subscribers. ADVERTISING RATES: Or.r Square, three weeks. Oie Square, three months, O   onc evening as the moon shone bcauti- close beside a Cotillion, what a place a fullV) wem into lhe g.roundo of tne to onjoy the finen-s of the weather, when the whole of the company sat down on the green turf, with the escopti >n of Napole- on, who stretched himself at full length on the grass, and said that his life hith- erto had been fortunate; and, after some silver clasps; or it may be simply a leath- er corset joined together by stitches. A skirt open in front and confined around the waist by a scarf or girdle, falls suffi- cicntlv short of the auLLs to show the wide Turkish trowsers which are tied above them. Close fitting morocco slippers cover the _ feet, which being kept as scrupulously enna, surrounded by his familv at St. Cloud, c 1T. clean as those of Hindoo women, if not like her wane, the map ol the globe turning, a gilbu lai'ing, the body gone, the chains hair hangs down over thtir shoulders in which held it falling down, Phccbus and his braids which are conftfu d at the end by a Ueaj in ,he cloudsj a VOSSt.j silver or tied ii'w th.- nesses of the lilne> with his hourglass and scythe broken, Cossack girl with bright ribl ons that near- a tobacco ripe illllis mouththe last whiff of ly sweep the ground. Sometimes also going out, a play book open, with these plaits are gracefully confined in a eseuul Olnnes" Damped in the corner an siikeu network. empty purse, and a statute of bankruptcy i Over their dismiss is worn a jacket of out agajnit nature. So far so cried noth- never wakened more. Napoleon. a (Jotiinon, a newspaper is to put a Death in. We arc readingso.nethingabouta home, and all at once, we are in the place of graves; we are looking over the testimo-' nials to the of Lile, and come, be- ing remains but taking his pencil in a sort of prophetic fury and dashing off the similitude of a painter's pallet, broken; finis exclaimed Hogarth, the deed is clone, all is over." It is a remarkable and well known fact that he never again took the pallet in hand. It is a circumstance loss known, perhaps, that he died in about a year after he had finished this extraoidinary tail piece. Metaphorical but Trathful. fore we know it, upon a "Died last night." If there was only some retired and sha- furtner remarks on ded curner in a new-paper, with a willow the same subject, he or an urn in it, where the names that have I No one imagjnes that I have a desire no owners could be recorded, and we could go, when weary with rambling through the columns of bustle and business, and read and think how sun ly, one after the other, all names tend thither those that stand at the head of the column editorial in capi- tals; those that are pointed at with a fin- gt r, and wondered over with Exclamation and afu r with Interrogations; for a country life but I assure youj would are protected in the open air by mittens. The natural colors of the face, however, ornamented with ringi, are in frequently left bare; out of .doors a kn.d of wooden clogs are worn to avoid Aa oM_Hne novcr votej for the dirt. The shppers are sufficiently co- a writes in the jfew York Jour- quetish, being made of green morocco, and nd Commerce that he shall vote sure of a M3C only to admit the foot small for He says high heels, and dainty pointed toes slightly turned up. Tho hands, which as well as the feet arc small, have the finger nails dyed with the juice of the flowers of the bal-ama, and mff of I: a; lie young lady was aroused from her de- J slumber, by hearing a noise at the Half unclosing her she as startled by the sigia of a co'pultnt ,'hose tnat were the other clay and ajipireutiy t gain ave 1 rides Min; kit with new bridegrooms; that were heroes, and found places in the 1( or beautiful, and woven in a wrt ath for Poet's Corner." But there is no such t.ut a narrow black line like this to keep the world oat; to prevent the Rail- IK-r firot thought was to j way Train, times are advertised be- jud to give the fellow a third to jump out of the window as soon as he jumped fourth, to scream, which v.a-, immediately carried into effect. The whistle of the locomotive on the Iron Moun- J'oad, when it gave its first snort on 1th of July, was but a whisper to the creams of the young The whole i j -.j -or wiiicn me cuusiiumuii UL no: broke into although the Circassian fair aro paitial to ticd liberty and equal rigl.u. Ti: .0 which the Emperor re- the brighte.-t tints in their apparel, being chalta of American rights, wh ,t earnest manner- theroto invited by the ,Ma of a to hw chamber, through the open It struck her at once, that the' iis-.rjder hod buca caught by the roar of ntionables, by a nail or som-j olh- vr J.urp instrument, as he seemed lobe whha stern determination to eL.tt.T- and half the neig by the outcry, female stnjut-, I u. t r -o.. r. :d i I iki-h'-d in the .1- ILO entered tliu u. '.h-.' fngY.ciiul L'u. iiy. An .n of th- the wiidjw jtd of a.l, ai.d d '.he the yjun? lady into shouu ol l.iugli- The imaginary "fai man" was ouly ier onn dailiiiir hooped skirt, which she iad hiujg on a hook near the window, and v.'iiich the wind had inflated and set in mo- There no more sleeping in the that Louis Herald. low, from running overthe name and ob- is performed in anothe, direction." if c-n f i I.-A n literating it. And so it is like a grave in a thoroughfare, covered with dust, and jar- red by passing wheels; it gives us pain to look at it, and we are glad it is only for a day. _ Died last night." It was nobody that in my power shepherd.'1 At this the entire a loud laughter, to joined in the mosi Indeed I am not jesting. Did my sta- tion allow- entire freedom of choice, my desire for the shepherd's life would soon be realized." And said the Grand Admiral of France and King of Naples, I wojld be a Venitian gondolier, in my boat on the sea, sing the undying so.igi of Tasso." "And said the King of Holland, "I would Dimply be a watchman in Amster- dam, where I should at least serve the in- lne socicty in which she lives, gives her terests of the country: at present my duty em the pan of Diana, and make her fit to be the warrior's The Constitution, the Union, is in dan- ger. The little cloud which Clay, Web- ster, and Calhoun matched even when death was dimming their vision, against which our Washington invoked the bles- sing of God, is now overhead and raining fire upon the confederacy, to every portion are not generally huightuned by the pencil, of which the COUatltation of 17S9 guaran- That magna which good men have thus far, held above and beyond landscape filled with a multitude of flow- lfce rcach of iu which has wav- ers, and in which the very rocks and   cruM.s ol for the you culiy in irect. UiMii, is hard work co.itroLi.w thu Cue human it diiii- niind search ural as well as most dignified But long as she is in market for a hus- land. she allows herself tibe seen freely Ly ail men, or lo bc- CO..H.- piichascr-. She goes abioad un- vemd; danceo v ith the other stx; min- gK :i arlosJy, though oflrontcry, amoi.g the nun; kiasiesthe hand of the stranger before seating herself on the divan Ly his tide; and though truly stroy then., w thoiu pulling down the tem- ple of liberty and crushing ourselves, as well as them, beneath its Let the national men unite, and in No- vember the course of the Philistines will Ax G. W. of the New Orleans Picayune, is answerable for the The most indulgent mother I have jbeard of lately lives some two and a half we often go far out of the way in the idle laugh that's pacing on the wind. .rf for for obtainingitaro Died last night." A pleasant time to die, but not last other night, a great while yet to come. To go abroad by the true light of stars; to find the way out from the port of earth by ev- erlasting lamps. Died last night." How many died; near us. boura" drii e frojn San Antonio, on the left. It was a long time before she would admit by> then we shall remem- tLat her eldest and best beloved boy, a re- :ber tfeat Jt wag lasf niglu died> and turbulect little fellow richly To die at ftny tl is a aud aw Sojrr following incident we had from a friend who knows the parties: Deacon Comstock, of Hartford, Conn., is well knjwn as being with an enormous handle to his countenance, in the i shape of a large nose, in fact, it is remark- how many beautiful and good; how many for gf Qu a ,ate young and fair; how many revered and wise. Some that you and we know; per haps one that you and we loved We have seen no resolution that better expressed a great political truth than the TKe'Herkimer county can contains a long letter an slavery man iu Kansas. After giving some account of the outrages by iKe Abolitionists, says Tarn not a pro-slavery man, but I -do despise, most heartily, this hot-headed, neddlesome spirit, -which so extensively exists in our country. I honestly, believe that the Abolitionists of the Territory the aggressors in nearly every case of diffi- culty which has occurred at least, so for as my humble knowledge extends this is positively true. I' go about my own busi- ness, and have no fears of being molested; nor do I think there is the least danger of any person being molested who wishea to have peace. It is the lawless of both par- ties that fear danger. I hesitate not to avow my principles, (which are no slaves and no free negroes in even to Missourians, who pass my house almost daily, and they say that every man has a right iu this country to his own views, and they have no disposition to interfere with any man's rights, They seem friend- ly and well disposed, but despise highway robbery, and Abolitionists." This is the testimony of a free State roan and not a Missouri There are hundreds of honest free Suite men in our midst who will testify to the same. We do not denounce- a roan for be- ing a free State man a man has a right to his own political views just as much so in Kansas as anywhere else but it is the out- laws that we denounce. This -man says, and very truthfully loo, that he honestly be- lieves that the Abolitionists have been the aggressors in nearly every difficulty which has occurred here. Any honest man will say the same thing, it matters not whether he is free State or All men are countenanced and protected by our laws, no matter what is their political opinions, and our laws are oppressive to none but outlaws and violators of the laws. 'It is for such men as these that laws are enacted every where. The law-abiding man nev- er. feels the jaws oppressive but such, law- tees lands our Tcrrftoty wijl; find them oppressive, no matter by .whom enacted, so long as they are made to obey them. These men that are hired to come out to Kansas, not to belter their condition not for the purpose of settling down and becom- ing peaceable citizens, but for the avowed purpose of openly resisting oar laws, are not law-abiding men, and of course the laws are oppressive, it punishes them. What body of men could enact laws to please out- Fremont and Abolition, and carries the flag i of Buchanan and the Union. Keep it before the people, that the Hon. _..._. ...A UUU V VL 11IU11 VVUIU. ItAVVO IV I'Ul- Josiah Randal, the eloquent champion or laws? Men who do not recognize even H-jnry Clay, in Philadelphia, is- visiting vu- T- j o _ the Consutuion of the Ijnited States, but nous sections of Pennsylvania, addressing mass meetings opposed to Fremont and Disunion, and exhorting his Whig brethren to stand up for Bachanan, as he is the only national candidate on nomination. Keep it before the people, that Alexan- the Constituion of the United look to a higher law? A set of men, too, who are circulating a petition throughout the Northern portion of these United States, aided by political priests, to get the most violent of their nigger-worshipping breth- ren to sign, praying Congress 10 dissolve der E. Brown, the leading and eloquent the existing Union. A set of men, too, who Clay Whig of Northampton county, have in instances hoistcd nation. is opposed to Fremont and niggerism, and al flag only sixteen upon it_lhe is making speeches in favoi of Buchanan number of the free StateSi thereby- striking and universal freedom for white men. j out aH [he Southern States from the glori- Keep it before the people, that lion. W. ous galaxy. The Black Republicans, at B. Reed, the talented District Attorney of some of their meetings, have done this thing, patriot and a Clay Whig, thcreby declaring themselves in tavor of has denounced Fremont and Diamion, and disunion. Can we expect such fanatics as is raisins his eloquent voice in favor of these, led on by such men as Greeley, Reed- Buchanan and the American Republic. Keep it before the people, that Hon. er, Seward, Robinson Co., lo acknowl- edge obedience to our laws Some of their Jiarlow S. Orton, the champion of the Clay political preachers and leaders have declar- Whigs in the St.ite of Wisconsin, has come cd that they did not acknowledge the Bi- out boldly in opposition to Disunion and fa- ble nor Jesus of Na_zereth as; their mas- naticism, and is now working might and ter, and can we expect them' to acknowl- main for the success of Buchanan and the edge any laws which' govern any people 1 preservation of our glorious confederacy, i When such men these are put down Keep it before the people, that Fremont peace will reign supreme in the land. is not a candidate in any State 'south of] We Lave too much confidence in Mason's and Dixon's line, and his election honest, conservative portion of the North would be fallowed by a dissolution of the to believe for ones that they will suffer Union, by ciul war and bloodshed. A WOMA.V CAS'T moJtst and decorous is her di ponment, be siayed, and the country saved. she wields her cheek almost without a blush to the lips of the wamor who. returning' Excellent Besolution. [from the slaughter of the enemy, feels en- j titled to clasin those favors which in less fortunate lands c an only be stolen by followi adopted by the Democracy of highly poetical young man in the following swains the most dexterous, and whose stars JcHeyj at theh. klc gtate Conven. aid them. The Circassian girls are sparingly nour- ished, says an ancient writer, living mostly themselves to be led astray by sach miser- able wretches as these, and we further be- lieve that they rise up en masse and 03> at the ballot-box strike Abolitionism such a deadly blow that consternation and terror these days when women distribute make speeches in public meetings, get up' mobs and wear high Loots, it is some con- d th-roughout the whole Aboil- solation to mankind to know that there are 1 lion: That the parly) ttill a, few pleasures left to his exclusive en- joyment. One of these is described by a rhapsody: She may surpass man in accomplish- lion camp. Iu last week's issue we published thc pro- ceedings of a meeting .of the citizens.of Madison-county, composed of both vative'and law-abiding free Stale and pro- Incn. at they pledged them- j wh h w-as talcing op a collection m the church to which the deacon belongs, on milk, bread of and pastry. Del- icate in her food as she is neat in her dress, thp UK, North nd ments.and be called but one at- gelveS( irreipeetive of paltyj to fe lainment is beyond her Territorial law-- ble, yet her can't This is proof conclusive their violent attempt to array aorainst tho South, In' their bmer denunciations of Southern "men, yevaer can i suave that au oE free State mea iti thbTerri- ery persona to whom he presented the box- tains, living in a society of simple tastes and Southern affinities; by their ing shaved. Let her have her fashion-- seemed to be possessed with an uncpntrol- and natural habits, always treated with gal- fa of the lair- lable desire to laugh. Tne deacon did not i know what to make of He had often lant magnifying the slavery question above all able haDerdasher) and kids and perfumed A SXCOXD RienASB-Cntw Bon.f wrrtt nmAr hv niTniprtinLllolls --._.. .j U-foreAe saplings were applied. Solomon, West, till the sky looks like a gieat tinted On his na-al appendage, and Lad placed a v.hL all wisdom.wasbehind the present shcn thrown upon the shore of small piece of sticking plaster Circassian head tne _ w _ as follows: I alone that wrapping the mantle of im- which are pasted on the end of every spool to clc There will in town to-day a lot of mortality about us; that putting aside with a pale hand thc azure curtains that are' This the l a sj Qn a ag enough to upsei _ of U.11ICS UUIA 11 lated with gal- magnifying the slaver a race of men whose other questions; by their contemptuous TV i v f m ivr 7 disregard of the fedezal constitution, and curls, and s.gU by intervals; she can never TEETH. -The Mta. of July appealing to a higher by their know the supreme happiness, the delicious- Slit tells the following good-sized stories shout, that upon this issue "Sharp's ness of leaning back in the soft, cushioned in regard to the products of the Golden arc the highest law; by their at- chair, the convenient rest for the feet, the State: t0 States 'in the avowed snowy about the threat, fine white Day 'before yesterday a woman in'the bvciul- enori to crush oiu the political influence of lathcr bein? off, the cool Western portion of the city gave birth 'td'a. the other fifteen States; by their struggle touch of the razor, the delicacy of the bar-" child which has twelve teeth! "Each crib 01 is-la- (0 ;mo Northern hands the whole ber's hand, the gentle titilation the''zigo- of them can be distinctly seen, and the lit- _ I power of the Federal Government, to the inatical are all feelings she tie chap" is very much inclined' to bite. complete exclusion of the South, are tread- is necessarily a stranger to. Woman s We are anxious to know what California conventions cannot reach the sub--will produce nejK. Yesterday -wo-saw they maj wear the breeches, but they strawberries, come the whiskers." and a cabbage which- measured I short, she may always have a dean circumference; and here fa, to be resided trues ima specimen of Black Re- drawn around this crudle of a world that of even a Puritan congrega- haipoliticianwiilfind his fullblowiihopea'scal-! EST The greatest pleasure of life and beautiful face, but can't" ketch the viated "chunk" j venturing away from home for the first j tion, and we think thc laughing justifiable. tercd around him by that day's decision. i love the greatest treasure, I barber's itch." Oh! how unfortunate 1 beginning for eating.things J   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication