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American Freeman Newspaper Archive: March 12, 1845 - Page 1

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   American Freeman (Newspaper) - March 12, 1845, Milwaukee, Wisconsin                               ma. H.I .Silk., do. ream Dnttm oichiu. do. da. H, th pint, l i Hactf WindavG'aM, i Dv Ijaad.fcav >nc Ri.-e, Santa Nulitieffl, U.f is. utcr. i, Spormiat Lemon, reen, ]ff irit ihfi i in he HE, re, Crock- rn GIotM ilnck r. d DS. I KEWLI.L., BY, k, no. ,11 br Inn r to, I 3 mnnlhi lot'ttl SO; far 41, one jrtnr for S6. T. W.IM 7.. C. Wyf.'' Jtfarrt It. "j PHY S 1 C I A N S tl H G EON PRAlUIG.viU.t, W.T. OHice al the P.nifiofillu House, v ATTOUJVCiT AT LAW. S.otiTiii'oirr, VV..T. JJOOKSil.CLLF.RS STATIONERS, Corner of Water ttnij Mulligan Strati,  SMT.I.OU Ar nri-'j.u u n A v. i'.illsy 'Jl'or. o. fo'OTAHV I'i'IU.li', A'S'n A c. UAV, M. fliartt- r J l-'rci-l'M Jcu-uilcr shop, coriu'j- of uu-J .D-.is; iirucla, s-J. .10 J'J r 1 1 Y t A x s ij 1; o x, Al l.'ni.; :stoi'c, .1. L. Wa Kl'l'I'Atl, d-nlcra in An. Y uiivit.c luij loi-ciirn (j-jurlii, Griiei'rius, Crockery, null UnrJ K-J-I'.-J anil Shoe .1, Hrfnirt.'M mill Mppi-i- '.OiN nod [Jye Wiuil'-i. l.'uniHr ol' anil WnU'r rt-'rrk. i.CO., IN Gooi.s, G Crocticry, t'umln. Oils. Uyie. otiifi'-j, IJuo'iM. Stationery, Iron, SU-i'l, Nilila, Garner of ini'l A. KI.V DuoH mill Shoo? or ovory tn orik'r, Kiori', iVliltvniikiu. April lynj A aj'Si o u s K riiif; .Vilmtukir, IK T. 13V 13 1C AN Si .l flTIIirc Alfuirican iy Oiiiinnodions in size, JL ami llic arrangement ol tlic rooma for coin- fort anil coiivi'nii.Mici! and undei the ol Mr. WIIITNKV tlic proprie- reel ounlidcnt that the American rnnU wiiji Shu best ol'thc ililwaukio. May 15, 13.1-1. IT TfJF. ht-rt'iuluro existing hr-; (WBPII i ho in name or ,1. WHITNEY CO., :s ihis dtiy ilii-solvoil l.y' limualconsoul1 All tlie nllftii-n ol' tlie Jatu fin'il' will he sullied by llenn Jmion. i JONAS WHITNKY, JACOB L. lilCAN, 'PAK1KL JONES. lL 18-14. fliui- OF CONNECTICUT, CONTINUED fi) Insnra or HV on Fornitiu'c, Vessels in port, Merchaiwtixc or Pruduci1 HI Also upon Merchan- dise ami Produce inland naviijatioiK WIHKCTOKS WIHK Wni. W.. "EUsvuxliiy. JDaniul .V. Clark, Chns.: L. Nurlham; Win 'Kellogg, S. W. Gnutlriilge, Henry Waterman, S- IS. Grant, Lemuel lluntphrey, II. W. Wllia Thrall, Elltry HilU, John H. 1'riaton, Win. A. -Ward, Ezra Stfonsj. Pres't. .Win. Connor, Sea'y. J'AMHS Agent. t, ltM4 LL kimls 'of B'nnii Books, Ridoil and manr ufiiciured to order, and nsupcrior siylp. hound to innti-h iny i i An'it. 1843 P. C.jKAtE, ftiaiUoacr. WISCONSIN V, iMKDlCAtr THEOLOGICAL MIS- JU.ANliOUS; ninl SCHOOL BOOKS, BLANK HOOKS, English and American iMiuioniiry, and kunnct bnaril, Printing i.nd Wr'ninf; Ink. Alsit, and PJ.VB'cUTLKkYj Porl- Card boota, Uammon hoards uritl Gormu'i fit-. Which of-, farce aa ill? most reHsoniihle terms. A liberal tlii. rnuiif, ti> and School Teachera. Particuhu nttoniion ghei 'to furnishing Public and Libraries, i 1BJ3, 'Ji'ijt lighi jj' seen 'ti> lull', And t .of Tyhat ,.....u.; Wiieli liopc's; brigbl dreams niade all so-feir, au'cinft'U one suWny The fopt may. pr.ejs .Ihe A riil uilor.-iifrom' lliem bring Thua, oft ill ulirrow's dotpcst liigKti If thitu lusl Ihe widow'j tcit, .P.ilietllhe orphan's Jut, Then, hast ihou felt, amid the gloom, .i Th'cru'n-as j sunnv sp9t. J If to llie.himlbli! couch of .Aid ilmfl'liast kinJIy.bronght, Anil pourcil jipo'n'a vfouridcd'hijirt The balm It vaiiiljr sought If thjni in prayer Wjlliiu the..lorflj cot j Thoii thou haat in i life V desert jirovnl Thyself :a nuiiny. spot. Thtiv what. (hough down (ho "J'liy barh be rudciy driveni'" Vhy ifi'lot'n imml iVev-r n6ar, thet si'fe to heaven. ICar.lb'd Avearv childri-n Ihun shall fiud care forgot, They, calmly rest sec.iirr frorri feurj The jjrav'c a simhy 'spo'r', Btmatracy ,oed; Vfjith if.'... rtjajiisf lo'Ai'lts' ho and (ml Walkw; ami Tyler, i Jacksoo, Pflk, eall.. He w to slsyery, for exteoiioR.Ql and an iricrtaie'. lof.'" oald M mulct him Soon he ntlorvJ, act! Jtek led him prot-lljr throogh hn [Hj'iilrd our his iir.prc-vcirrat, f Jrfe nii.h hrr ut matt ibitl I'w i Coixl ch llir H.-rry NToi t, wf.ilt- hi? t.nl nl Jick thu fru-al, Oh, that amlv Biljj, ntkt of tlie sacrifice the iriterissjs of, freedom, ;ini vile to the she insolent-dictation Mt the Soulh" in man the, title. can eaVi'i btr'ri as matter! than -a the j' aire Iy opposed, to generally ii) iayor of: ,__._.__, T this sudden change'.', has this i almost, cphversibn The Slave Jj'p.wer v liSiiral-- or "qmlitiesi of. 't'tie ld th'eir misi'if- ahle victims in Spairlacus dtsplayed a rnilitsry genius and a hetoi'aui iigaintt until his little arihy wui; divided egawiit itself: 4 Yet of two u in thr one for philanthropy tnd profound chiefly in. tiveness, brethijen caltl.eyWd nearly, as serfs ahd 'parcel of i'iKat'. famous haVe seen so' inuch claplrsp in.ihe few years paiit, since "jhe projetjt of extend'iiig tfiti of frceJoin lias; been discus.setl and A'still inore exaiii- case of the.. J .-jjime' of enorjiious .tyrannies wor.ld of the most ainoiig-nitons Io w.WQJrn they 'had. glvff.h a r'ljljgi'bijs'.sy'stem, ajjid who -borrowed, 'front.! .them'''their choicest 'examples ioEj eloquerice, ajid :pai.lios, afld ;sublime Here--wij's and is a peb- ple I'eijiarkable above-, almosjt all" otbeis fhr 't.hy.possesaio'n bf'.lhe' higheiU. .and cleare'sl intellect, and. '.yetJah'solutplj'dwarfed and ri mind by beingfster'niy d.ebar- red.frpm npy but'the very men- t -ii.'.- I'..-. L. i .1-. t. .1___. _ ;is if about-face the Dis- tnocrasy T-'.v. Su'retyV if1 there ip'f true niartlintfss, any ondepetiijt- in thtt; part ijs- unity .tji.ust be. es.Be.r.tialJy jmpairexl ay... this last (antaslic triclci which -must ptipr voice the .scorn of '.he iriilignatiiiiri' of .'riieichttJce of all honest Djs- niocrAts. ;itiust now. be] their ;prij- lcis and. reticij'to fhe'one- nocessnrily luvolviss n tbt' otliKr.' r .i ....'I.-'1! Bctwci-n wdilcls.lil'e asiar, "Twist ami vqrgo, How lillle dp vy.u know that wo ari: How less jivhattvv mny hr 'VTlie f'turnal -Jiul'go. Of timo atid tide rolls on, and hears nTar Our bubbka: aii Ihu-old new LashM frnm the ftrain of agei) wliilc..lhc Of cmsirvs licave but liku aumc yrare'fc. ir t> j ir .1 n-JU. Thi're is'nqlliirig mo re sadly j.bly ludjcrous-. in the motley face social" system than .the prejudice I As if.no -.a.r.riingetnenl. of sociB.ty .cquld 'perTeiet in which liieri; was.not some arhi- 'I'il The Iniij UuRjrmcr, liku.lhe hews Ihe forest, must throvy by ihuuglit of case or rcstini: fill h'c die Nor in his nnbl-j hreul admit the Tear. Of ill i.ulthousli may.not.heiir .The voifco or I'rienil, nor.ycc one living To him on hia of duty .high, .Arid wnXhim when his ioa are lurking near Yvt liirWs of beauty, his Shalt rise in lovrlines-j, where now the gloom 01' Error dolii Iho.light'of Tr.ulh withdlaml The loncli he I'clls.shall hloom 'J'hriiugliiout nil aftcititiic and.thoso now. Scowl vfilli Kind tomb shall bow An i tha Christian A'SOUTHEKN Like the h'nndle of a Jug, all on iime is-ai- phrase-, which- (lesccibeai the coiuproinisea between' and (hu Ihe Soulli, un- dcr this specious t.o hjye .ail 'controverted matters'1 Arranged to 'Jier So it the 'jufangu- itK'iil of iher slave 'it; was in tlie Louisiana and treaties, provided new territory tliH Kouth could carve slave Stateii so it was; in the' Missouri so called, was- really no compromise' at all soslje is to liave- it .inithe acquisition of slam territory, by ;the. annexation of Texas. i The resolution :'for antiexation which passed; the -provides 'for 'the prohibition of .slavery in'thnt part of Tifcx- iis of 33 degri'es and- 'ID- 'rrijiir utes ntitth r.tjiB line of the, ..Mis-; souri Oninpromise. look on Ihfi. map of Texas; arid how our Soulhctri iiiastcrs to divide (that country twcen Liljjjrty and Slavery, arid you wiltt have a fiijir illustration Southern prornisesJ, Jhithe first plaice, on in (Jrclinary use, it 'will that Tex a" does not 'extend -so far jVorth as the pro- posed compromise un- doubtedly true, in pnint of ifiiut. Freedom, (hen, gets nothing, and; Sliiyery all. IJul a- new mtip hms -ju'sl he'eri 'IpQbtished.'uri jer. lite r authority of the 'Uepnftiirieiit, considerably extends giviug.it a tlice.of. iding the pro vi (ice of Santa Fe. By .what right' th'c ancient hounds of Texas nre thus we rtre not -anJ in trie ahsfnce (if sut'h information, every :chndul and; man. must regard the map .But even to doin an area ot only .squart miles, trary (tislinclion lift'er ahoKsiii'ng all-ol'hcr-ariiticialcluims supi'ripri.ly, cling Xvit-h the.despair., of. 'from th But they had; the advantage roriri therniitio'tis whb'i'ii' they' und.er- went -their, latest and worStil'ciip.li'vity'.'.'a'ntf. ;a :tfieiii have been :eijablsd to raise power and ni ihe color is niaije most The news- Man or wo- I'r'a'cB inustalways -'prefix the same way Ihiit they say Ihe Jtonorable .Muni'b'ef of Congress or "the 'pnpers canj-itiever- say simpy. i man in speu'king of the "African Had freedom and on Brjt- h tho'iiaiu deniid tliein, in Ihuir native Und. For-rnore than a year after he.ifirst enter- project ofjfieeiiig (iimseif, he could hot determine ;to jiut lit execu- tion. .His old loved him, weuld be almost hi art-brolieii, nut so mueb for thij loss of her child, :that should diwraco himself by runbling away, C. '_'fc 'I 'i I f for she bdonged to tbal of.jxbor crea- tutm who are taught by their and mistreaies, thai there s no d sgracs so dreadful that of being branded u a run- away. there w tumnotl-or tie that bound Jack Io hia hon er. Th i was his rnaslcrV son, -ybuiij 'Henry Horionj a beautiful ;'boy of fourtelen1. His kindness of h.e.ar.t and.. rendered him an universal favorito, and tblnone was he mbr.e (teari'hin. J-i'-c'tv- Qn. muny a uright he Bad', carried .little Henry on hiis shoulders to the creek, viihere be taught him how to his btiat, c-r to the.cHesnut grove, where he the: trees aiid, shook down the brown nuts for the. delighted child- And since Henry had ;rown a large boy, Jitck was tlie chosen rbmpanibn tjf sports, tlio coiifident of i is'boyish pranks: .Henry, was inteliigont, had read more than .most boys of :his aj-e'..' He delighted o tell J.ack of Ihe wonderful things he read .of. Triiyels and adventures: were his and Jack gathered much thi" miihuer, thai of jrt-at use Io him afterw.ard. ,'j Henry laught Jack to it was done so quieJy and in suoh a natural way, hat he scarcely knew hr was giving Jack n.siruciibn, until .oleraiile reader, eel that Jack; was..learning many things, unfit for a.slave, and Hc.iry '-wasireproved severely for his imprudent conduct- But though willing to respect liisfather's wishes 10 far as to refrain from teaching the slaves a future, he could not conceive how lhat which he was to believe of the ut- he bad., become quite a Hia father soon discover catlfd a runaway, and mi flit give n hint me, that'would du larm." Henry assured Jack tliat lit; woa! 1 liavc nnlhinir- lo fear from him, and bidding each osher' an affectionate farewell, Henry naw tin: fugitivu in the dim twilig it, bending'uver j the hills, guided by the no tliern star, La a land where slavery is unknown. Henry returned home an heart. Although hi flrrriy resolved on what he thought riglit, yet so good and obedient a child could but feel du- tarfacd at the prospeci of giving ofleneu to kind father. It was quiti; dark when he arrived. His father, who hsd beenanxiaus- Iv of Uie ulavi- nlVshr.1, Jl K.u-h (wen il.- lilt It'Vfi  liilll ffllfived Ir.s iltanillialv tin? hai Iii.-'uil, whiiii his hujj glorious, and hu lici' somelinii'S tn tin; j thul won: haiiow-.'il ti: hij ir.'- could and could 1 re- '-ho days of his iM'.uu-y ami turn his kindness by crushin i IH" "ame unli caini; upon him while he I- would not betray him, fa her. Hu has j nursed me and played with me ever since j d his hop? of; ...v i vulij ilia u 11 HI u FSn UY HIS Ol ost importance to himself, and without freedom, and to ft s ten again I he which hu could, not become a good and chains he has so manfully broken, 'lie lias L' useful citizen, should be so very hurtful to been gone from the neigh bo -hood for many ris, I would ibor Jack. He had not yet learned either I hoursT Do riot ask me my i Reverend Doctor of Divinity, to ex-.ite our Vom false philosophy or prejudice, the in- father, 1 cannot betrav .lack. .fa-vbr'able-sympalhics, a culorr.d feriorily of ihe colored race. UK felt that die lirsl sonHjust. dreadfu wbinih-io.ind.caia.l.hal-lhere is no Jack was Ui no rwpocL his inferior in His falbrr's first that of! ot ...quality, to. mo.ro absurd and. moitp of.our-lroii'bUng oursympaihira al all. j natural gifts. Heha'd-as much shrewdness I anger, lhat his child should dare dispute _ u isa and: nddre.ss ns any boy lie- knew.; and his his will, bin a moment's reflection and lorlhern love of Ic'npwl'e'dge often taxed his own ac- (irm but respectful manner of Henry, cim- ot Iheir I quirements to the.utinoat. His father took..... -Ifealty to. the I great pains to leach him that, that could jmigmc-ritfrom the reason and ofj'our- .than an accidental 'in 'the vessels- of Ihe skin would seem ndSi- I of-high. indeed, even of. manhood f..Jtiiy.so surely. i as -a colored man. ijiriy; a to... German Cou'nt who.had: the rounds of" .ejirned bis tills by UIB niore vaiuj ai'ion of. thirty r.ix-doliais. ;Or is it in sjinii; cppstitutional compact! of to the i great Ihe as in- 'only be htirlful to-Jackwliich would bene- lit him.. But Henry WHS very .dull and slow to believe that any good reason existed why Jack should 'not leani as well as him-' selfj if liu had :ihe capacity. Care; religious.- headed i laken.theiiceforth to separate Henry and color were :an .nggrava- his favorile, iis much as possible.! (intls--his tlaiin 'ioleiislave cjjlored eijtoluslvp of this chroiristic noblessK wouifl sjiand in.'imniinent. .peril of l.heiiash of the .overseer at the of the editor1 ('Who occupies the position tlie duties of ,'lhat distinguifihed meniber-wf at "the.. Worth. For .we assume .it.as a primary ar- gluuieni that when the moral vision pf a .njtin .beco'me's perverted etiiiugli I'd persuade at thai he is superior to his fellows, he ing to their own standard, a palliation of il. i It has always sfienriecl to Albiiji- .tionis'ls could in no.- way more'usefully.- serve their..holy .causa than by-seeking to .elevate. .Iha condition of the 'colored racy.-in the free Slates; and la'-bri-iuic down: every barrier of .invidious distiucti'un be-.- ivfe.en them .and brotheVa. that deal has.benn done, but it. has not..been primary.'object. A few. such UJ lllut iwi -us., uja.jiriiiina, IJST in i i i L. r f men as Douc ass one Kemond iira the in. reality .looking.up at .him from an tm- Jir.- -J strongest. Anti slavery ai'gjjmentsi ..line very: j'ook and henrj ng of Douglass are elo- hnii .nre -full of iin 'i.r.resistiblB; logic iiicasurable .distance -beneath.' ji' i IJegar-ding.. the. Amerjc'an: peiiple as.'B; professedly Christian people, tbeir.nnti-. are at first.sight ast'g.ri-' ishjng enough- Were this the the them' might be traced to tlie" timii arid uhfiiithful'n'ess, 'of the phurch, which the: pj.uce. of. a; coriscit'nq.cj and whose, njpss, instead .of .beirjg finmded immuia.bly'. upon .a. living 'inward principle, rises anil, fijjlls'witfi'Mfiel. popular 'IjikWvrarhiness or' zijial. Gle'iming to be. tiTtdi vine -.origin.; a-rtdf appointment, .its jl.uiain .Dtc.upalionii-w.buldi nt'verlhi'iess seem to prove by itsl.s.ubser- vjnncu.tb (hat il ii merely" altoVchanical'coritnyahcd1 of saviiig natioha'l1 [ur people go o.nce or in .a -week to Uifi.. Upraises of .ineokricssj il tnlertwinejl.: itli 'theoi'bgicnl' dogmas Ihe Matter'.. sA-ijS equally antl tHert'go praujicslHhe'.very revarst; iti ,w.ithoutritiie i H iple, the black having; endured .uh.i; rallt'led hardships hips rtPsignalibn and pafienci-ji :atfe: "despisild as.1 wanting' in spirit .arid.ca, hiiying disp.la'y.i.'d', pi any. other jf become; toe theiSie of1'novels' and .rbmaniesy riru cijius as, one.of, ;t heir ijf? w.ar. songs1, i and, melons; examples, of iijterly, harharous anjd-' 'This "we.'girX CJbriat, and Loms.. the. Ele.ye.mh thuugh we, wear the; .tjadgH.ij. ujf; our ;reitgion' jifeosl '000 square styen tliura Stales, each, uf which will be' that) ;What a iconripromise.' '_ .....j B i But Jhjiif'is noi1. all.' Southern :whiich is jlhus' allotted toi is "ine' only part of Ti-iiis mhaKled by civilized parl, in fact, which is in- -thip portion being: .a; mountaiiious :'and barren Ciyiliiatioh will not probably trnfcs for Jwnlurien to Iheiiiieu-obist.and all thejnavigahle rivers, leaifing jlo. 0-t'ndotn among the with des- j erta, rocltn, rioua coihprouiise t Truly the Wiw Ex Tfl csl 1 1 his oonW proiiiise, is to cprnmoo and toailetript Id palio it ojff upon i pur'cim'reiiiericei'tb -i'-- ilej as a prfaphcsy. .is iigainstthe ng a wliii'-K" to fe sla'tisiicaf fcctl iiient of ambition, 1i; that i oTtlie'two irlrtJM: against'ilhe-oppreasioniif. his race. VVe had any intended ;tp introduco1 n new element of civilizatiop, that the Caucasian.would he .benefiiled greatly .by itifusio.ii of ils..ventler. and less sallish qualitijtis...... The mind, .vjhich. seeks at whatever.jcost, can never coma beautiful: or Chris- height of a niix- iure humbler, bitt.lrtily inrire obey. While our moral atijnosphc.ro. dense arid ''h'cawy. with prejutlice, it will be for. the" man to.sland erect'or breathe freely, i Even if he riwjiie the atle.nipl, -liu can never attain thai quiet unconsciousness so necessivry fuiifaud harmonious he is con- tinually forced to'resist press-, ureifn'mi. vviitiiput. 'It'is fiiriiis to ''endeiyor let rediUCBilhisititmiisphere Io thetrut; tribrni .earnestly'and.as constantly tiisp..against, the: sliiv'e systeiri of the'. North' is against thai of tho So.ulh.. Had .we T.fibiri'we miglit historical examples that b i, improved ;by eing brought a ciyiiiiiitioh under thti most terrible- :.'In lucky of, large pro-. .i w hit; ti- -c ins'i's t'e'ii c hlefljt' -of la lid -and -''i: he 1 Iteisjj- them, in ;good. wigrking jtonditioBf ,aBd': he beio known to fliainiss ,ovfrBeers for extreme cruellfi The'hbuse wer.e allow.ad. soiiife to possi Jack was soon convinced that he hud no prospect of beller.injj his condition! in rflave- to., escape as soon as possible. tolil no one, not .'even mother, of his purpose. His plans were sltillfulK- promisi-d sncce.-is. One about lliu middle of winter, Jack was..missing. It was, at- first, supposed lhat. he had -gone without leave to visit, on .some of ihe vinoed him thai the boy act -d from a viclion of duljr. And he be- lieved him trj. he wisely decided that this was not the time to con- vince1 him of it. Ho therefore mildly said to him, Henry, I shall 1.01 attempt to force you to do you think would br wrong, and this is not a proper lime lode- i cide whether you have aclei or nol. VVe will t.ilk ihe matter ovi r another t'mir. Meanlime your supper, you must br j wearied with your wa k." Years passed Hi-niy Morton, now? u fine young man, set out on a lour to l.he j North. al tlie Falls of Niagara, lie went with a small party of friends on a 1 short excutsion in u small r-ail Ijoat. The day was delightful. TiMiiplcd by Ih und contempt, lie :-ln: Mii. to him ami rt'tn U'heit ali otlji'JS H.irk li.; churcli-lu.dl sujiuii'd, and h' remembered ihe lunii- ol' cxrculiiMi turnkey iMitrred, and. loan; frini. >i fru'n Ihcir .u'i.-, :it am! th.Mi eyes met say tin- do.ir t-n hint's, and lin'.v par No! not f.nT.ver ii n.-i l.i-avi .1 At soinise tu-xl I.'.- martyr to iii.-.; country V libei-ly. lia girl lay upnn hrr 1 was linn! h r Io in. IliN ln'au; il'.ii neighboring I balmy friishiiess of the air, they Imd already pi plantations; but wheu or, closer search it j proceeded so fur thai they could scarci-fy the was discovered that 'lie had run. The j hope to gel homo before night sel in. Tin-1 lu-an" neighbors :were .soon assembled, nnd men on horseback, wilh -dogs and .-..lui as dr'-.Ho Mii sut.'out in ptirsuil of -the fugitive. guns, Jack hud foreseen that .they vvould con.line their search chiefly to the ra.iids'j Iwading Norlh, arid he wisely secreti: him- self, for a few. Jtiys, notijfar from home; until the heat of the cbas.y t.hould be over. supplied, himself with a good- stock :of provisions, for several hacl. courage arid rely for future supplies. On, the second: day of his absence, Henry set out with ,his dog and gun for a day V sport. No one suspected, that jack still lingered. in the 'neighborhood and Henry much' an be'. -''laved him, .most. .tVrvenlty hoped lhat xvas alone iu the.'vvoods. The brpyvnjlj-ay.es rust-led heneutli his light step, arid the keen air whistled .among the naked branches of the trees. H'tinry was sad. -Jack had always been his companion excursion; -and the :dai-k forest seetiied Joiiely and -desolate., as it had never done before -Crossing; a ravirje, down w.hich a lorrent. had passed .d.uring the rainy season, and left- tn mark palh .huge heaps of 'old trunk's and brajn'ches of trees, atejpped on one of these trunks which extended .quite across the -bottom of the for. the purpose of reaching the. other side, wilim he observed a dark object beneath a. bed of leaves.. Alipther glance' assured liim: thai it was 'Jack. The poor fellow Hiinry looked, wilh pity, on Ihe uncjonscious was his faithful frjerid, the nurse of his iiifnncy.lhe companion ofluter hilling like a felon from all that he ;had ever and loved on thai !he might seek-jn a distan) land this fk-edom he believed ttt. be his birlhright.. JTiWn hi th'tiughl of his father, and of the proh.ibility of his- enquiring "whether lie had seen Jack. He loved nnd respected h s fathert-ahd he' :would not tosavehts own life, lellin lie, but ihe firnxly resolv.edj Ihatcomu.whilt would, he .neyet' would betray, Jack, tljinry still inuri1 s-lin was already sinking In bind the ihick hein i forest. They were nil strong and nkiliful what boatmen, and their little danceil over I {o the waves with Ihe, must I lion. J j u.- ).n the hriijhl glow of sunshine, amid (he! K perfume of (lowers and the songs of biids, i lioljert [C.'iioi.'t- wafli.-d from the shore, had not j cor'iiiiin  jF by I to sell his li'je Hearty jjfor'hB. had not'lojlbe takijn ala'rii'i quickly chang1 'i; ''when J h'e rucpgnized hii (rtiasterl oat to Ihe North, and he rejoiced i to youitg ied to set to meet 'Ybu v on'i' tell saw Henry'ij'-l knoiv {rand; ifi.eyery -bbdy-lj'weji 'never., run1 away, I ypu very 'wjsll am goiie, you wil.l mr.mmy.. Her, I'll 'do refugejrs of Canaila, who .ha.vu lied the mercies republican slavery ir, the Uriitwd Slates, persona! ilom iij that benighted land, lu chains and Ihis glorious republic. The 'of Ihe-jjcpllnger observed j husband's agitation, while i-ndfavnrine Io restore! lilt; uijcotiscious stra whi-n returning the 'ghastly face, a'ild liahtt-d tlie dim'leye, arms riuindTlhe-still ittiieiisildf cx- Thank God it i; Master Henry Mortal thai. I've itrrved." Soon, by. his rt'ilHwi'd-effurU Hi'nry riwtort'i) to euri- sciousjiiiws, nivil-Kh.'red transports of Ihf "'ll" -w'as is'olil mailer's beneath bit owr. mere Or. llic emu wilh earthy infiisil'le i ri'djJtX'd Io liir Male in rcpi'uiii. v. itli Minn The propin ties i chiiiifted ciiiu-ii'an., Miuill adijiiioi; to of b-'ii i! liv a d.irkt- >m i tl- Ili-cl. n ar [iriii-tli nnvrc brinK1 i may Klin llllt. lv.'1-t) I'll I'jr '.In- iiiii uvo rain- iii i.it t.y r.nc.1 :mv o.lli r l-st H J t I   

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