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Mauston Star Newspaper Archive: May 22, 1861 - Page 1

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   Mauston Star, The (Newspaper) - May 22, 1861, Mauston, Wisconsin                             COXTHTY. Wisconsin, STEVENS. WJ3T EN> OP EMPIRE BLOCK. WESTWARD THE OP POMISE. LE-AJDS JTHE WAY 'of Suliiicriptioji' oopy one (if paid within Terini of Advertising 3 iu. 7. 1 square, 2. .V2 3- 1th Half Whole 500 Ky Ten line? (of this type) make a square. Business Cords, not exceeding five Knea inserted one for _ Ftrjons advertising by tho year, can havo their adver- tisements changed oneo ft quarter withput'eitra. clxarge. EBNlSDAY, MAY' 22, 1861.': great coMtewmtum among tbo who entirely with a BcienoaV and-it was -minutei fore any one could be persuaded to .ppro.oh. and t theJ the not render m. deitruofibfi to In Advance.' York YOIOJJTEMB. OFFICIAL DIRECTORY. VILLAGE OFFICERS. VILLAGE OF JIACSTOJJ. TRUSTEE TREASURER ASSESSOR MARSHAL. SCHOOL SUP-T MARTIM GRAY, Pra M. M. MAUGIT3. JACOB TOWLK. PLUMMEK.-11- WILL1AM T. P. NAUailTON; JOHN LYMBURN. M. G. BALFOUR. A. M BURNUAM. JAMES COOPER. County Judgo, Sheriff, District Kcgister of Deeds, Treasurer, Clerk of the Court, Clark of the Board, Surveyor, Coroner, COUNTY OFFICERS. D. BCHERMERUORff THOMAS 11YDH. J. A. KELLOGQ. A. K- AVERY. C. J. LEACH.'.... TilOMAiS PAKK3. C. P. CUTLER. B. C. MOBTOS. E. G. LITTLE. STATE OFFICERS. Governor, A.W.RANDALL. Lieut. Governor, B. G.NOBLK. Secretary of State, L. P. HARVEY. Treasurer, S. D. HASTINGS. Attorney General, J. II. HOH'E. Bunk Comptroller, IK VAN STKEKWYK. Supt. Public In.t, J. L. PICKARD. Adjutant General, WILLIAM L. UTLEY. Chief Justice, L. DIXON. e BUSINESS CARDS. P. R. BRIGGS, Justice of the Pea4e, will promply attend to all business entrusted to his care. Blank deeds, mortgages, lanit contracts, etc., always on hand, and filled out on short notice. Also agent for tbe Phenix Fire Insurance Co., of New York city. Offica over Fluid's Store. Maustou, Juneau Co., VS'ia. 1-tf JOHN TURNER. Atturouy at Law, Lnnd and Insurance Agent. C'oiirt Commissioner and Justice of the Peace for Juneau Co. i Will promptly attend to busineu entrusted to him. Mauston, Wisconsin. LVHAN CI.ARK. j Dealer in Dry Goods, Groceries, Provsiuns. Clothing and j Notary Public; Land and. Collecting Agent, Lyndon Station, Juneau County, All bujsmesa to him will be prumptly attended to. MAUSTOX HOUSE. well kuovrn Houee is well furnislied and up in order for the comfort of the traveling public, and proprietor flatters himself that he can give nai.isfiu3C.km to all who'may tnako it thoir abiding place tor a longer or shorter time. Paasenjcra carried to and from tha oars of DUDLEY LITTLE, Proprietor Mauston, Juneau Co., WU. 3. T. HEATH. Dopaty County Surveyor, for tlia County of Juneau. Will attend to Surveying of all kindi. Haa the Field Notes of Survey. Enquire at C. W. Atkins' otore, ifiujton, Wisconsin. [17-6ui] A. T. JOHNSON. Attorney at Law and General Land Ajjent, Hijlsborough, Bad Aie Co., M'isconsio. Deeds, Mortgages, Land Contracts, etc., always on hand, filled out at ihort notice. [3-4T-tO JOHN A. KELLOGG, Attorney at Law, Notary Public and General Land Agent, Mauston, Wis. will attend to the collection of iebU, payment of Taxes, Maujton, "Wisconsin. 49 F. >VIJiSOR, ittorncy and Counselor at Law Mansion, Juneau Co., Wis. Abo GeneriJ Land Agent and Conveyancer. Deeds, Land Contracts etc., always on handaafl filled out at ihort notice. LYMBURN. d, Biscuit and Crackers Wholesale and also dealers in all of Groceries and Provisions, at the "Mauaton Mauston- nl 8. FIELD, -Oommissioner for Juneau County, and Justice of the Peace, Mauaton promptly attend to all buanese entrusted to his care. J. R. Bennett, Esq., Janocville; TV. N. Woodruff, Chicago; Bliss Spear, La A. F. Cftdy, WaUrtown; E. D. Motors, W. R. Jarvis, Kewport. M. M. MAUGHS. Lumber Mcnufacturer, at Maughg1 Mills, All kinds of Pine Lumber constantly on hand at the lowest market price. JIauston, 'Wisconsin. WILLIAM SEARLE. VETBINARY SERGBON. (FROM IJIQLASD.) BEGS leava to inform tbe Public that he has located in MAUSTON, and, after thirty yeara practice in the above profession, flatters hiuself to be thoJoughly acqiudnt- with the different DISEASES and TREATMENTS fccident to HORSES and CATTLE. By strict attention to business, and moderate charges, ho hopes to "uin a share of Public patronage. linement, and Founder Ointment, should ot kept by all who owu Horses and Cattle. It only need a trial to prove its unrivaled efficacy. fjy-MedicincB prepared on short notice, and warranted genuine. 'T wta the train' drew noar-; Si's.'v.The'city 'anil 'tie inore; sunshine, to'ft atid'cledr, -Vfo J Sag .'appear, And in our hcarta a cheer For Baltimore. Acro'is the bros d Pa'ta'psco's Old Port MpHsnry bora The starry baun'er of. tho. brave, As when our fathers went to save, Or in tho. tretuhed .find a grave, .At Baltimore. lufo'ro MS, pillared in the. 'eky, j Wo statue soar Of 'iijh-i- Could traitors view -tliftt form, nor' fly Could patriots see, uor gladly die 'For' Bait imoro? "Oh, city of our country's 'By that swift aid we bore Whan sorely pressed, receive the throng Who go to .shield our flig from And give us welcome, -warm sad strong, la Baltimore 7" We had no anus as friends .we came, As brothers To rally round one sacred The chortor of osr power aud fame Ws never dreamed of guilt and shame In Baltimore. The coivard-inob upon us fell MoHeury's flag they tore Surprised, borne backward by the swell, Bwit down by mad, inhuman yell, Before us yawLed u traitorous hell Baltimore The stroeU our soldier-fathers trod Blushed with their ohildren'ti gore Wo saw the craven rulers nod, And dip in blood the civic rod Shall such things be, 0 righteous Gud, In Baltimore 1 No, never By tliiit outrage black, A soluinu oath we swore, To bring the Keystone's thousand's baclr, Strike doivu the dastard's who attack, And leave a red and fiery track Through Baltimore Bow dowa, in haste, thy guilty hand God's wrath is swift and The with gathering bolts in rud Cleanse from thy tiirt's the slaughter shed, Or malic thyself au ashen bed Oh Baltimore Bayard Taylor. You are perfectly Bis-; com. panion these fogs are unusually heav-yi> they are even to the constitution of a Hollander. As for me, I. am-nearly :choked with How different is the.aunny-clinie of Spain> which Lhave just left." i .v have traveled some, tcr, inquiringly. .Traveled ay, -to the remotest corner, of the Indies, amongst Jews, :Turke and Tar- tars." ,J "Eh! but docs it please ye to travel al- rb'n daviTe'ver known to pity? The stranger held him tightly, and, spite of his struggles, dragg'ed'binMahqreJ Ho felt .the grasp of his'puTsuer45.ke tho; clutch "of a bird of prey; wbile-his -hct ".'breath i almost scorched-bira but, disengaging himself with a sudden bound, ho sprang 'from; :iiis -enemy, headlong from his elbow-chair" on-- the.-floor of bis-own room at-Voorboocb. b'y the: full of. the burly Hollander arosed his affrighted help- ways in that garb, Even roplied the stranger.; descended from father to son, through :more i than three generations. See this hole.ou the left breast of my doublet out his neck, and by the dim light perceived a small perforation on the breast of tho stranger's doublet, who..con- Ah I the bullet that passed through it lodged in the heart of my great grauclsire, at tho sack of Zutpheu." "I havo heard of the bloody doings at that place from uiy rest his Peter was startled on perceivinc the mate from the sound slumber she had been wrapped in for more than two hours, during time' her husband had been indulging perceiving un- earthly smile which played over the counte- nance of the stranger on his hearing this pi- ous ejaculation. Ho muttered to himself, in an audible tone, the word but was interrupted by the loud laugh com- 1 panion, who slapped him on the shoulder, and in potations deep .and st-rong, until, overcome witb: the potency of' his beloved -liquor, bo had sunk his- elbow-chair, .and INTERESTING JQUBKEY. .LOWls's HIS TRIP S. C. Prof, Lowe, the t, recently balloon voyage from Cincinnati oiina in nine lours. He ascended former, place .between 3 and 4 o'clock i. .M. on the '20 th iiis't. :Wo the material portibns of his "interesting account .of the ourney" At a quarter to 5 o'clock, light of' day was sproad qver the..surface" of 'the eartbVand ____ _____ ____the beautiful farms along: dreamed the 'Lellistrdreabr wo have endeavor- seated a-spliiirdid appear-anbo; the- stars--had disappeared one by cue, and tho day-god was fast approaching to take their place. I was now over the Ohio river, on the Kentucky ed to relate. Tho noise of his fall aroused his vrow from her slumbers. Trembling in every limb un hearing the unruly sound below, sho descended by a short flight of steps, screaming aloud for help, into tho room where she had left her spouse when .she" retired to rest, and beheld Peter, her dear husband, prostrate on the stone floor, the table over- turned, bis.glass broken, and the remainder of the accursed liquor flowing in a stream from the at-jne bottle which lay upset on the fluor. --that- 1 wa. -Trcar; tho in- tbe township- of liW South h. State.. of ,.Qhip that. morning, and informeBie that t'h'ey wou.ld be very thankful if I' 'would leave, and ordered' the negroes to let ropes-they werer holding; -fBeing desirous of F; a "1 "threw out-a sacd ahd.oommenco.d ascend al that nio-. merit: one' of the "seeing "'tho bag of 'Band' faJr, sang out, "Hollo, 'stranger, I-reckbo '-you 'yo lost -your bag- AN AFRICAN TRlBfi. Chambers' Journal, discussing a recent cried, Oome, come, mynheer, you look sad book of missionary travels in Africa, thusal- ludcs to one of the tribes which does not my liquor sit well on your stomach "'Tis excellent replied Peter, ashamed I, to think that the stranger had observed; his lnco'Jmta confusion: will you sell me your "I had it from a dear friend, who has been found long since replied the stranger he strictly enjoined me never to gelt it, for, d'ye see, no sooner is it emptied than, at the wish of the possessor, it is immediutelv re-filled but, harkce, as you seura a of spirit, it shall be left to chance to decide who shall possess it." He took from his bosom a bale of dice I will stake it- against a guilder." Good said Poter but I fear there is some deviltry iu the phial." "'cried hia companion, with a bit- But thu strangest of all tho stories told arc of thu Dokas, who live among the moist bamboo woods to the south of Kuifra and those who have traveled -under- tbings better. Deviltry, for- Only four feet high, of a dark olive color, savage and naked, they have neither houses nor temples, neither tiro nor human food. They live only on ants, mice and ser- pents, diversified only by a few roots and fruits; they let their nails grow long like talons, the better to tear in pieces their fa- vorite snakes. They do not marry, but live iuJiscriinina- tive lives of animals, multiplying very rapid- ly. The mother nurses her child for only a. short time, accustoming it to eat ants and serpents as soon as possible, and when it can side, aod at an elevation of feet, the thermometer standing at At 5 o'clock and 5 minutes, the sun showed-its golden rim above the horizon, and soon shone full upon the huge transparent globe overhead, which was now perfectly distended, and presented a splendid appearance. In ten minutes more' the rays of the sua appeared on the tops of the hills and trees, making long shadows on tho earth. I now looked in the direction of Cincinnati, but it had entirely disappeared. On looking to tho south-western horizon, I could discern a small village; which has since proved to bo F-ilmouth, Ky. The rays of the sun upon the balloon caus- ed mo gradually to at 7 o'closk the barometer indicated an elevation of OOP feet. At this hight, my jippotito beina very sharp, I partook of a hearty breakfaatj after which I took my glass, for tho purp'o e'j of hunting out objects of interest, and by the aid of which-1 could disosrn high peaks of mountains on tho eastern horizon, also to the north-east and south-east. At a quarter past 3 o'clock, I was passing over a hilly section of country, and fast approaching tall mount- ains. I was now south of the Ohio river, and could not discern it even a telescope. I now concluded that the course I was pur- suing would take me to tho Chesapeake Bay, BOOT SHOE SHOP. respectfully informs the citizens of X Mauaton and vicinity, that he has taken the shop re- sently occupied- by Edward Smith, in the lower village, he is prepared to manufacture all kinds ot work is the BOOT AND SHOE MAKING fine, prices. He can also MEND as well as wiU take Wheat and Hides in exchange for work at Ciuh prices. All work made his shop is Warranted, CASH PAID FOR HIDES. GABhIEL TEACHERS' INSTITUTE, AKO CLASSICAL SEMINARY. TRIBKDBBIP, ADAM3 COUNTY, WIS. Tera Karch, 27, 18C1. can be obtained by application, or by D-KoeiBEJir, A. B, CENTS bushel will be paid for good Wheat, on lubseription to the Slart BI.ANKS! BLANKS i: BBB0S, acOXXG-ASBS and Justice's Blanks OB hand ud. .for clieup, at tKi: THE MAGIC PHIAL j OR, AX KVI3XIXG AT DE.LFT. said the portly Peter Van Voorst, as he buttoned up his money in the pockets of his capacious breeches, now I'11 home to my farm, end to-morrow 1 '11 buy neighbor Jan Hagen's two cows, which are the best in Holland." He crossed tho market-place of Delft as ho spoke, with an elated and swaggering air, and turned down one of the streets which lad out of the- ciiy, when a goodly tavern met his eye. Thinking a dram would be benefi- cial in counteracting the effects of a fog which was just rising, he entered, and called for a glass of schiedam. This was brought, and drank by Peter, who liked the flavor so much that he resolved to try the liquor Accordingly, a glass of a capacious size was set before him. After a few sips of the pleas- ing spirit, our farmer took a view' of the apartment in which he was sitting, and, for the first time, perceived that tho only person in the room besides himself was a young man of melancholy aspect, who sat near the fire- place, apparently half asleep. Now, Poter was of a loquacious turn, and nothing ren- dered a room more disagreeable to him than the absence of company. He, therefore, took the first opportunity of engaging the stranger in conversation. "A dull evening, said the t'armcr. Yaw replied the stranger, stretching himself, and yawning loudly, very foggy, I take and he looked into tho street. Petar perceived that his companion wore a dress of dark brown, of the cut of the last century, A thick row of brass buttons orna- mented his doublet; so thickly, indeed, were they placed, that they appeared one stripe of metal. His shoes were high-heeled, and squaro-tood, like those worn by a company of maskers, represented by a picture which hung in Peter's parlor at Voorboooh. The stran- ger was of a spare figure, and his counte- nance was, as before stated, pale but there was a wild brightness in his inspired the farmer with a feeling of awe. After taking a few turns up and down the apartment, the stranger drew a chair near to Peter, and sat down. "Are you a burgher of Delft he in- quired. was the reply; "lam a small farmer, and live town of Voorboqch." Umph said the stranger, "you have a dull road to travel. See your glass is out. How like ye mine host's schiedam 1" 'Tis right excellent." You say rejoined the stranger, with a smile, which he thought greatly im- proved his countenance but here is a, liq- uor which no burgomaster in Holland can pro- oure. 'Tis fit for a He drew forth a phial from the breast of his doublet, and, mixing a small quantity of the red liquid it contained with some water that stood on the table, he poured it into Pe- ter's empty glass. The farmer tasted it, and found it to excel any liquor he had drunk. Its ed the hand Pshaw tor smile stand these I crave your said Peter I will throw for it and he placed a guilder on the table. Tho farmer met with ill luck, and lost___ Ha took a draught of his companion's liquor, a d determined to stake another guilder but he lost that also Enraged at his want of succeis, he drew forth the canvas bag whieh contained the proceeds of the sale of his corn, and resolved either to win the phial (the contents of which hud gone far to fuddle his senses) or lose all. He threw again with -------0------r------a 1TU1B. better luck but, elated at this, he played to wlth tuijir heads on the ground. Yer in a field, I descended near to them, and ask- considerably south of Washington, as that city was due east of Cincinnati, and I was moving oast north-east. At 9 o'clock I was help itself it wanders away where it j passing over the northern range of the Cum- The alavo-holders hold up bright colored j bcrlaud Mountains, and bore iiiy course chang- tn i.lin mmcf tosouth-east. .Below, and for milus around, was a barren wilderness, but at some distance ahead I see occasionally a farm hoWse. Being desirous of ascertaining with more cer. t .inty my exact whereabouts, I let off gas, aiicl gradually dusoendod to within a short In slavery they are docile, attached, oba- j distance of tho earth, with tbe hope of see- dient, with few wants and excellent j ing some one to inquire of. As I passed They havii only one love of ants, hero, I found a.strong current blowiuo- direct- mice aud_serpents, and a habit of speaking ly to the south. Suoing some Woik clothes as soon as they coma to tho moist, warm bamboo woods where these human mon- keys live, and the poor Dokas cannot resist the attractions offered by such a superior peo- ple. They crowd around them, and arc tak- en by thousands. with less caution, and in a fuw minutes was left penniless. The stranger gathered up the monuy, and placed it iu his pocket. is their idea of a superior power, to whom they talk in this comical manner when they are dispirited or hungry, or tired of ants and You are unlucky to-night, i snakes, and lodging for unknown food. Tho ed, What State is this out answering, looked in all The men, with- dircctions but said he, with provoking indifference, which upwards, and fearing that I should ciisa thorn, I again sang out at the top of my voice, when seoui to come the nearest of_ all people tho reply came, Virginia" they still' look- greatly increased the farmer's chagrin "but j J'et discovered to that terrible cousin of hu-! ing at a cluster of bushes, from whence prob- come, vou have a goodly rinsr on your finger uianity, the apo. j ably came the echo. I then asked -what come, you have a goodly ring on your finger will you riot venture- that against my phialV" The farmer paused for a was the.gift of an old friend yet he could not stomach the idea of being cleared of his mon- ey in such n manner what would Jan Brow- er, the host of the Von T-rowp, and little Kip Winkulaar, the schoolmaster, say to it It was the first time he had ever been a loser in any game, for he was reckoned the best hand- at nine-pins in his village he, therefore, in Hoiupstrect, Military a communication to Secretary at Cairo, the New York sketch of tho Cairo, which we do not remember having seen before I need not state to your readers the goog- raphy of_Cairo, III, a town of -inhab- ably came the echo. I then asked what and threw oat some sand to clear the tops of soma treos. This .struck the ground with a spatter and caused them ,to look up, Tribune, gives the following aud ilistead of answering the question a yell c.'of horror rose from them, and if theflcetness topography and defenses of of foot is any indication of fright, they must havu been terribly frightened. I _was now .mounting upwards but still in the influence of tho southerly current, and. by _ J AfVVVrjiJll took tho ring from his flnger, threw again, itant.s. jt has many times been glanced at nnn 1 naf if" i i -r..i.c ever Its effect was soon visible he press- and of the stranger with great warmth, and swore he would not leave Delft that night, and lost it He sank back in his chair with a suppress- ed groan, at which bis companion The loss of his money, together with this had nearly sobered him, and he gazad on the stranger with a countenance indicative of anything but good will while the latter drew from his bosom a scroll of parchment. You said he, for the loss of a few paltry guilders but knaw that I have the power to'make you amends for your ill- make you richer than the Stadihuldcr "Ha! the fiend thought Peter, grow- ing still soberer, while ho drank iu every word, and glanced at the legs of thn stran- ger, expecting, of course, to SOB them, as usual, terminate with a cloven foot but he beheld no sue'-; unsightly spectacle; the fuet of the stranger were as perfect as his own, or even more so. Here." said his companion, read over this, and, if tho terms 3-our name at the foot.'" suit you, subscribe The farmer took the parchment, which he perceived was close- ly written, and contained many signatures at the bottom. His eye glanced hastily over the first few lines, bat they sufficed. Ha now I know thee, fiend screamed the affrighted Peter, as he dashed the scroll in the face of the stranger, and rushed wild- ly out of the room. He gained the street, down which he fled with the swiftness-of the wind, and turned quickly, thinking he now safe from the vengeance of him whom he now supposed to bo no other than the toul fiend himself, when the stranger met him on the opposite side, his eyea dila-od to a mon- strous size, and glowing like red-hot A deep groan burst from, the surcharged breast of the unfortunate farmer as be stag- gered back several paces. AvauQt! avauut I" he cried. "Satan, I defy thee. I have not sign- d that cursed He turned and fled in the op- posite direction but, though exercised his utmost speed, the stranger, without any apparent exertion, kept by his side. At length he arrived at the bank of the canal, by strategetic It naturally commands two of the noblest of rivers, with all their large branches, with an immense trade. But I will give you tha general topographyof Gui- ro. It is situated on tho extreme southern poiit of Illinois, which, in dry weather an 1- low water, is dry enough for a town, but at high water, as in the present case, tho surface of the river is eight or ten feet above tha lev- el of the town, which is protected by levees the course I had taken I concluded I near the township of Joffereonville. 10 o'clock I crossed was t fif- the Al- ______ loghanies, going but a trifle. east of- south. _ About geve.ity miles ahead wore the Blue Ridge mountains, extending bol'h north and south as far as the eye could sue, and seemed to obstruct my passage in that direction. _ When about half way between these two ranges of mountains, I found a very deep current moving south. Here I could have discharged ballast and risen out of 'the influ- ence of the mountains, but running several miles along the bank" of eauu cpoe of the but I knew the coun- river. This levee is some fifty feet above trJ was rough and there was but little COIU- low-water mark, and this is to us a ready- indication .for hundreds of miles made breastwork, perfectly defensible from to -big" enough to. reach ..the eastern direct fire from the river. Nothing can be j require nearly, .the ballast injured except from you know two' can play at that game. North of Cairo far several miles, reaching from river to river, ij an interminable swam, passable only by the Illinois Central railroad. An'd this road we have wcii guarded. Cairo, then, is an isolated dry spot, and at all of the available landing places Major J. D. Webster has planted batteries, well en- trenched and supported, so that the channels of both rivers and their confluence are com- manded, and the batteries are so connected that they can rally instantly to each other's support. This gives one a very fair idea of tho pros- I had, and by BO doing 1 might be obliged to descend on.the other side: far from a railroad, I thought it best to. sail down the side of tho.mountains and come over the lowest points. Looking to the I ;c'ould distinctly see the highest peaks of the Blue llidge Mountains, .which I knew divided North and South Carolina. Feeling uneasy lost I should got into South Carolina before I could get out of tho.ourrent, formed by tho mountains, I discharged a quantity-of ballast and again ascended, with the hope of clearing them to the North but as I neared then: I .again glanced off to the South, until near the highest peaks, when, being determined to test tho reliability of the and leaped into a boat which was moored followed, and alongside. Still., bis pursuer Peter felt the iron grasp of his hand on tho nape of his neck. He turned round, and struggled hard to free himself from the gripe of hia compaaion, roaring out in agony, 0, Mynheer Duyvel 1 havo pity, for the sake of my Tfife and by boy Carl But when ent center of Western military interest. Upper current in that unfavorable spot, I im- o mediately discharged, sixty.pounds of ballast, arid in ten mjnu.tos my elevation :was foot, with gas discharging from the upper .-and lower valves, and then I continued to dis charge weight, and let off gas until I hud at- tained an elevation, of feet above tha level of tbe sea. Here, tbe thermometer fell to. below water, fruit and other- took place in Madison recently, which is snrioand- ed with romantic circumstances.' Miss Ho.n- rie, of Dumfrieshire, Scotland, was engaged to Mr. Murray, of Madison. On the 13th of last month she.sailed from CHasg'ow, and af- ter shipwreck, and escaping with difficulty in a lifo.boat, she was rescued' by a steamer, which shortly took flre. and sho was again saved and lauded at Quebec. Sho next traveled by railroad, but the same ill luck followed her, for the train she was on was smashed up by a eollission, and she had a narrow escape. After this last misfortune sho safely arrived in Madison, says the Pa- triot, where we trust she began a career of good fortune and happiness by marrying the man of her choice. A WORD of kindness is seldom spoken in is a seed which, even dropped by chance, springs up a flower. A man acquires more glory by defending than by abusing othere. thingsirozo, and it.required.all the clothing and blankets I had to keep me warm. But I had gained one had clearnd tbe mountains whose tops were-oovered with snow, and was rapidly moving to the east. It was now 12 o'clock, and. I, could distinguish the blue ocean in.tbe eastern horizon. Not hav- ing sufficient ballast to remain at that great altitude, the bailoon gradually sai.k to within feet of the earth. Here, tho current was a little south of east again, and knowing that the coast -in that direction was an uninhabited swamp, and I ijow, arose. 7r, th.ere remain- ed. until I. .wafted -'some twenty miles farther to 'the half an hour which, time I heard dis- charges of what I'took- to'bo 'muskets. Not knowing, buti being apprehensive that the my head, was the. object of firing, I prepared Jor making all the signals possible when I sjbfould again near the ear tb, but while I was .tbus.plevi'ated I bad -no" fear, for it was inipossibhrto 'send a ball' within a miio of me. Having several yards of red silk in my oar, I tied it to the edge, and let it hang down by descending this would keep in motion, and give the" whole concern a more life-like ap- pearanco.' Thus with, hot in ono hand ready to wave, aud valve-rope in the other, I commenced a gradual descent __ When within half a mile of tho earth I hoard loud-cries of terror, and saw people running in all directions but 1 was. determined to land for good this time, let come what would, and in five minutes more the anchor took firm hold 10 a short scrub oak, and" the car gently touched the ground Thus fast, tho globe, gently swinging to aud .presented a very lifo-like appearance. I soon noticad some heads peeping around the corner of log hut that stood near by, and in which there seemed to be persons in great distress. I called to them to come and assist ma, of which they took no notice until I threatened to cut .loose and run over them, after which two 'white boys, three old ladies and three negroes, in a body, ventured within twenty feet of me. At that moment a gust of wind caused tbe balloon to swing over near tha ground, and a general stampede took plaeo, which caused me to abandon all hope of get- ting any assistance but after telling them that it was fastened to a troe and would nob hurt them, they again ventured up, in com. pany with a stalwart young woman, six feot high and well proportioned, and took hold of the edge of tbe ear. I inquired what wag tho matter in the house, and was told that several old persons were praying, as they thought tho day of judgment had come. I then asked if there were any white men about. They said they expected them minute that they saw the great thing com- ing, and had run for their guns. This was rather an unpleasant piece of information, and I was determined to keep as large a crowd aronnd me as possible. In a fewlain- utes, men with muskets began to collect, but seeing, women, children and negroes surround- ing the air traveler, there feonicd to bo no use for fi're-ar.ns so I discharged the gas un- molested, and packed up the machine ready to leave. By this time, several more rough- looking fellows had arrived, and threatened destruction to the devil" that could travel through the air, one adding that he had fol- lowed it ten miles, and shot at it sis timaj without any effect. The tall young woman aforesaid assured me there was no danger, for ail the men then in the neighborhood were cowards, as all tha bravo ones had gone to the wars, notwith- standing they all declared they were not afraid however, promising to give mysolf up when I arrived at the village, they con- sented tbat I should leave under a guard of nine armed men. Procuring a team we start- ed for Unionville, a village nine miles distant, and arrived that evening, halting in front of a stone building with a small checkered win- dow. A council was then held with the jail- or, who positively refused to allow any such animal as they described to come into building. I was then taken, to a hotel, and soon fouud persons of intelligence, who assur- ed ma that I was among friends. Here I ro- maiucd over the Sabbath, a.nd was called up- on by many persona of fine education, who informed me that of all the places in tba South, at the spot where I landed the people were the' most ignorant, for they could nei- ther- read nor write. The -next morning I started en rout 4 for home, but news had reached Columbia, tha capital of South -'aat a man brought papers fro'ia Cincinnati, Ohio, only nine hours old I was therefore arrested on suspicion of being a bearer of dispatcher. This: brought together a r.umber .of learned and GcieutifiB pronik-uieu, who at onco knew me by refutation, aud saw my position, and I was immediately le'eascd, and furnished with a passport by 'the Mayor of Columbia. Ere concluding this h isty narrative, a word or two is rcquii ed cOi corning the succoai of tho experiment, for which I will say that had my air ship been of feet more capaci- ty, which would have enabled mo to sail a mile higher, I could have landed on the sea coast, in a due east direction from mj start- ing point, in less than six hours. As it was I was taken out of my course by tho infiul enoe of the mountains and the local currents, over whieh, with my small machine, carrying he-ivy instruments. I had no control, landing, by the course I traveled, about 1 200 miles from where I started, in 9 hours which -require! five days and nights -steady railroading to get home again: From, the experience I have gathered, I am convinced that, to travel in the eastern cur- rent requires twice the .altitude over land that it does'on the coast and over the wafer and when I consider that the local currents on tho earth were during the whole day 'moving to tbe south-west, and with, a machine only one- eighteenth the capacity of the one. I prepared to cross the ocean, aud traveling the distance I did, and nearly .eaat the most of the time, safely conclude that with my machine and its appliances it IB an easy matter to erons the Atlantic ia two days. Is- are- doctors and So we sea that it takes   

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