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Manitowoc Pilot Newspaper Archive: September 9, 1859 - Page 1

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Publication: Manitowoc Pilot

Location: Manitowoc, Wisconsin

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   Manitowoc Pilot, The (Newspaper) - September 9, 1859, Manitowoc, Wisconsin                             From tKt Ettrgrttn City SB QEHTLB TO TtiT Wlf gtaitte: there are boon when her form with pain to rent paMire ahadea flit o'r hei brow, Bj and Borrow Be penile; 'til for yon she from u> nor evW for ought Arrow lofe itene. fei gentle though "her aching bcut A hot; word may piotapt, balm will the wounded part, And busb each bitter thought. gtatle: 0, 'twill tboie pciiu That nek her gentle frame; Kind aympathr from loring ftienda, Light Hope'i expiring iamtlK knew you the joy the feels, "Wban year ate can beguile, Tou'd team to apeak an ajigrj word, To bar who bat in your smile. TJaaaid, tkcn, that creel word, Twould caoaa her many a bitter moan, Aa fount, tbuarndelj stirred, aighs for her cbfldhood'i home. Than rbarUh wall that gentle dore, Who for jom mlone her Jay; Ktdtem jour plighted altar- TOW, Ti her loye and ajmpath y. CLARA. IVpUle, or what a Simple Country Lassie did. ET MKS. MART A. DEKXISOX. UNION, CONCESSION, FOR THE CAUSE-NOTHING FOR MSN." BY JERE. CROW LEY. MANITOWOC, WIS.5 SEPTEMBER 9, 1859. VOLUME 1, ATO 9. I----TOE OLD FOLKS. In a largo old-fashioned farm house, de- void of prentension in style or furnishing, awt a brown farmer and his wife. They ware homely, old fashioned people, and while the good woman sewed, and the farmer looked on silently, smiles lingered om their were listening to a simple little song that came from the room beyond, and whose pathos sometimes made the' tears Twilight was falling, how softly! in pleasant Tillage. That beautiful hour Menu holier.in the new autumn lime. The woods are crowned with regal splendor, and the hills change from glory to glory, M the great sun sinks behind them. The I birdi twitter bits of is written on field, leaf a red flower. The old farmer and his wife felt all this in iheir simple, loving beans, as they look- ed abroad, still listening to those sweet words and the full, glorious voice. "She's a dear whispered the far- mer, as he sank back in the leathern chair, Isn't she responded the farmer's wife, hiding a tear aa she natu- ral as she was the day she went." I don't see no rejoined the old is, there ain't no dif- ference in her ways. I was feared she'd put on airs and act like Jenny Uroadfetch. How I do dislike lhat gal with her hoops "She isn't like only like her own dear she knows a sight For says she to me to-day, aays tie, "mother, I went to school to im prove my to gel only a smat- Urin' of the different branches, and I be- like what I know, I know thoroughly; and I maun to keep on larnin' after I help you, for we must still be larniri' day after she, and dear me! I can't talk she she knows considerable, I can tell you, aa you say her heart ain't jined to any particular idol of faiuion. It's jeit the same as it ever was, dear child." "Play another, Nellie; you ought to see father and they are listen ing I it's a real treat to look at believe they think: you're an her younger sister said. Helen laughed a little and sat down _i.i_ her soul out in melody, and and his wife smiled and listen- ed and imiled. II----THE VOCSO FOLKS. From tho entrance of the great stono post office in the City of Notions, two young men moved slowly, one of them un- folding a letter ai he walked. Well the word, the taller of the two. "Oh! a most cordial a grand old farm house ho hflr What ii ur-v' or guardian, or a of relation; but lo tell the truth, n-i very near; my father's Eocond coawn married his sister." I am glad we shall be near each other I go tlie hotel in the town, you lo this double and twisted second cousin; but I'll warrant you I shall have you down at the hotel in lest than a week." Perbapn you returned the other; there are many beantiful and intelligent women in the town, and just about this time we shall not demure at a chance ol their acquaintanceship; good night; we'll the first train in the morning; lie to your toe and I'll pull it as I come by." "Don't you fonr but my eyes will be "open quite aa soon as replied Free Carl ton's friend; and thus they separated III----THE ARKIVAL. Ml ia like summer exclaimed Irving, u she stood on the old grey slab kt her father's door. "It ii like repeated, for the odor of the flowera is in the air, and ihe sun falls liotly; on my forehead." ixellie mvie a beautiful pictuje, framed by massive oak panneling of the brown door. The fiice was ipirituelle, the hair golden and wavy, ihe eyes deep, glad and bltfc the spring heavens. The glow of .uercue pave her checks the fresh aud beautiful lints that health dips her pencil IB. Her morning labors over, she said to little aisier that it was so glad and out of doon, that she would take pencils and go to "father as a twitted old tree on the farm, blessod in iUbMuty and its shadow'1 was named. tree sketched with a bold and (pirited hind, and laM within the loaves of ae broii-Hil 'nth She --at completely hidden from the road side, ihough very near, enjoying the breeze that carrie with a soft undulated swell, rich with the fragrancy of many a hayfield. Slowly sauntering along came two young men, one of them bearing a small valise, that looked more as if it was filled with artist's materials than the wardrobe of a fashion- able traveler. Thoy paused near the elm. "Oh.11 shall soon get sick of this, said the younger and handsomer man. "After a sketch or two, I guess I'll make for the hotel." I told you replied the other; but you know what old aunty always things is mighty uneartin." Vou may not only fall in love with this old country place, but with some red-cheeked, brown eyed country lassie, with a fine farm in beauty you know." "You mistake me, Ned, if you think so; I would rather die and be buried at once, than wed a mere country beauty." 1 But, my dear fellow, suppose her in- telligent, modest, and full of nature's poet- ry, tender-hearted, graceful, unspoiled by adulation, a gutless, simple, loving crea- cried Fred, laughing, "a. choice clnstre of accomplishments and graces. Country beauties are always sweet, gener- ally simple, often guilelesss; so are cows. No, no; I tell you if she was lovely as an angel, gified with common sense, t-killed' in butter making and quilting, aye even ij she turned out unexceptionable bread; still if untaught in literature and music with a soul wedded to churns, ovena and knitting-needles, I would'at marry her for a fortune." Ha, laughed Nellie it was a very pianissimo laugh, away down in the corner of her musical little hefiit. Hidden by the trunk, she turned over the leaves of her book, rustling them loudly and laughing heartily to herself. Another moment and a slight knoll re- vealed the lovely girl. Fred's face turned crimson, he bit his lip and whispered in visible trepidation, do you think she heard the other rejoined, somwhat con- fused, "she would not betray herself if she is evidently engrossed in her are safe I imagine; she could not have heard what an angel she is! "Who can she be V Yes, Nellie was an angel, as far as out- ward beauty might merit the name. She sat half reclining on her rustic seat, striv- ing to smooth out the dimples on her cheeks, as she laid her book 'lemiirely aside, and began to pluck tlie moss from tho roots. Leaning on one white arm, the gnarled trunk a back ground, a red geran- ium blossom twined in Ler glossy hair, she sat qui'.e at her ease, apparently unaware that two handsome young men were so very near. Approaching with a low bow, upon which his mirror had set the seal of fault- less elegance, Frederick Carlton spoke to Nellie. Would she pardon Iho liberty, but he was seeking the house of Mr. Irving and if she would have the kindness to in- form him where she resided,   k'iiow tfca't- marriage is a devine institution, ah'cf that every one of yon should have a wife, what kind of rib would you select? A pretty useless little or a woman big and1 spunkey enough to rassel trilb a' and come ofl' best? I imagine you would" care nothing for either extreme, but ycu would look for personal charmes. O, you fool- ish 'idolaters at the ehrJne of be'auiyV Know, you not that hundreds of husbatuls are made' miserable by handsome wives, and that thousands are happy in the' scssio'n of homely ones? homely lercU utiuiciiuui. LiJe i j. o i is not always the index of the mind; who she began to question him: can tell what flashes of romemberahce waft Stranger where mought.you be from, the criminal back ns in a dream to the guileless memory of his childhood? Who 'Madam, I reside in Shejby county, Ken- tucky." "Weirstranger, hope no senses, when he saw her banding, a breath- ing vision of loveliness, over her her full, white arm leaning on its golden that-rich voice, now plain- tive with some tender rise and fall in sweet and sorrowful cadence. Tell he said, when once more alone with her, what does this mean? who and what are feel like a man waking from s dream.' "Only a conntry girl." said Nelliej gravely; and falling on her husband's neck she cried, "forgive me, dear husband; I am that very little rustic that you once thought you had rather die than you remember? Are you sorry you ruar- risfl me thntynu Icok so ir.v "lurious wife'. Hut Xellic, can tell his agony of heart as thoughts come trooping to itthroug the still watch- es of the lost night whose dusky shades shall gather around him ere he is launched into elernity! What a theme for speculotion must be hie appalled glance into the futurity where a tribunal awaits which can read the secrets of his soul like an open book. But we breathe freely once moro, and we wake for the once, to suggest to some of our confreres that they had better be discreet" than "valorous." Therefore, oh, Provincial and suburban editors, whose night thoughts should be serene as the dreams of infancy, dip not your prolific pens in the gnll and wormwood of criticism, lest the law of libel may make you liable for damages done in your want of appreciation of Fifth avenue prodigies, or Ucnvery snobs and ye be mnl- et in fine and forfeiture. Avoid as ye would a pestilence, the law and profiting instead by our disinterested and platonic suggestions. And, here, perforce we must terminate our night thoughts by the aid of tired nature's sweet balmy Sleep steals on as even likt big brothar, Death, We know not when it know We insy affect lo scorn and to conttain it. For 'lia the bigfaeet prida of Human miner? To it knowi not fer an opiate; Yet the reft parent, deapuinnf lorer, Erto the poor wretch.who for eieeplicm, Faeli this oblivion, against which he thought Hid woes Tiad irtaei Kia acneM, steal npon him, i Aud throu-h the fencoleai but what mought you be way' up here? "Madam 1 am searching for the lost.sheep of the house of larae! 1" "John, John IV come .here this minnitj here s a stranger all the way. from Shelby, Ken- tucky, a hunting stock, and 1 just bet my life that tangled-haired old black ram that's been in our lot lost week is mte of hii'n. The following is a list of the'revolution- ary soldiers supposed to be living, and pen- sioners on the. roll of the State of Michigan with their age, in De Long, Van Bnren county, 100 years; Hooper, Bishop, Oakland Colinty 00 years; Ahira Brooksy St. Joseph county, 99 years How- ard Brooks, Wacomb years; Giles Norton, Livingston years. The following, are the.Harries of all "the revolutionary soldiers in Ohio whcrare pensioners with Amaiia Oandsll, but beautiful within. Alast whatii It is the flower that wilts mid with- ers almost as soon as it is a tTari- scient rainbow, a fleeting meteor, a deceit- ful -will-o' the "wiAp, moon- light. The kind of wife ycu- itant is of good morals and kno s how to1 mend Iroivsers; who can reconcile peeling pota- toes with practical or fashionable piety who can waltz with ami with the tea kettle who undei'stiiwd broomolo- gy and the true science of mopping who- can knit stockings without knitting her brows, ard kuicup liar liu-skind'a raveled sleeve of tare. who prefers sewing tears with IKT neeJle to sowing the' tares of scandall with lier'tongne. Such is decid- edly a better half. Take her if you curl get tier let her be up lo her elboes in the suds of the wash tub, or picking the geese in the cow stable. My hearers: 5Iy text spea'ts of a before the wash tub. You may think absurd-hut let me tell you a female can be a lady: before the tub in the kitchen, aa much as in the. drawing room or in tho parlor. What constitutes a lady? It is not a costly dress, paint for tlie cheeky false and falser airs; but it is her general deportment; her inteilectnal en- dowmects, and that evidence of virtue which commands the silent respect and admiration of the world. She vrould be recognized as a laily at once. It matters not where or in whnt situation she was found, whether searching for bed -bugs with a hot poker, or hollering hallelujah at a camp meeting. All that I have fur- ther to say, fellow bachelors, is, that when you marry, sec that you get a lady insida and who knows how to keep the pot boiling, and looks well lo her household. So mote it be. their .ages, in take county, .98 "years; _____ Jarad Farand, Cuyahoga county, D6 yeans; William Jones, Clermont county, 98 years; Adam Link, Crawford county, 99 years; Jamas McDermditi Ricularid doiintj, '101 years; John Strait, Gallia Samuel Sanford, ;Portage Carey colinty, 98: TJIB Chemical arlalyeii sfedwi that "tartar" on teeth is the product: .of a living insect, npon which .neither or tobacco juico Lai any affect, but which is Instantly destroyed by soap hence, plain white ?oap' is recommended as the best deiitrifii.'fl. A RESIEWT >OR De- troit Advertiser suggests the following: At a tiros when this dreadful disease ia prevailing to sa large an extent aa at pres- ent, a remedy for it would be a publia blessing. We believe can suggest one that, if not infatlinble, we know, i'roin ex- periments in.our own family, to be very successful. Tttke the pith of a common mullen much, say as will be found in a foot and a half of the boil Ita few momenta in a pint of milk, and let the patient drink it HI his leisure. The mullen does not effect the taste. Tho beneficial eftects of this simple and pleas- ant remedy, in several c.nses that have come 10'our ktibwledgc, have been speed- ily witnessed. Everybody should try can do bo harm, if it does no good I" But we are confident LliiU it will dogrtat good. It may be old to some of our read- ers but probably hew to'olbers." Do yon suppose liiere is any doubt about my'baggage going to Canada} quired an .old lady of ihe.famous wag, while he was seeing eome friends off at tha Albany depot a days since. My deaf answered B., sober- ly, it-will depend entirely on the moral instruction." w-- answered the uncomprehending Jt has receded. Was it wbrhati1, "it was brought oh a hand 'in preacher, laUly said in "Let worben while p'nttiiij on their profuse md expensive attire, bxm   

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