Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Manitowoc Herald Times Newspaper Archive: May 16, 1946 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Manitowoc Herald Times

Location: Manitowoc, Wisconsin

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for Liking us on Facebook

  • We are retrieving your image from the archive...

  • We are converting your image into tiles...

  • Almost done...

   Manitowoc Herald-Times (Newspaper) - May 16, 1946, Manitowoc, Wisconsin                                Forty-eighth Year-No. 178 -STATU HISTORIC s MADISON. WIS.      I Associated. Press manitowoc, wis, Thursday, may 16, in6 Price five cents HONOR DOCTORS BACK FROM SERVICE-At the Holy Family hospital Wednesday noipi. the hospital staff honored four Manitowoc physicians back in private practice from service in the:medics! turps, with fi dinner attended by staff doctors. Dr. E. C. Cary of Reedsville. chiel or staff, acted as 'oastr..aster Standing, left to right: Dr.. N. C. Erdmann. Di. Cary. Dr. L. W. Gregory. Seated. Dr. R. W. Hammond, deft) and Dr. R. S. Simenson.   (Herald-Times photoj Submit Coal Dispute to Arbitration, Is Plea Federal Union of India Announced Attlee Reveals Six-Point Plan 1   Li London. i.-P for a iedtra announced in mon. Pi - The United was resenting the soffcoal operators. Nations security council today the house of com- will give Mr. Truman their deci-hy Prime Minister sion on his coal dispute arbitration proposal at 4:30 p. m. Mani-is a fnvdrnment towoc time today. plan was drawn     The chief executive made his sn cabinet mis- suggestion at a morning conier-�.> ir.rlia following its unsuc- ence in the White House with the fni  negotiations for Indian: tiro men. .vhile paper, tnc jp bv a three-r unanimously adopted a secrecy rule which would permit the council to deny the record of a private meeting to every U. N. member not represented in the il-na-tion council. Paul Hasluck, the Australian delegate and only council mem- Conference of Ministers Ends; To Meet June 15 Discussion of Reich Treory is Unsettled; Russ AgreeTo Flan By LOUIS NEVIN Paris \!P)-The four-power foreign ministers council spent three hours in almost fruitless discussion of Germany today and adjourned later in the evening until June IS. when they again will attack the unsettled problems of peace. Soviet Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov agreed to an American proposal to end a four-power commission to all four zones of Germany to investigate the state of German disarmament, an American informant said. But this proposal was thrown out by L". S Secretary of State James F. Byrnes scleral days ago to counter a Soviet objection to Byrnes' offer of a 25-year four-power mutual assistance pact to guarantee the continued disarmament of Germany. At that time Molotov had objected that Germany's present state of disarmament should be studied before such a pact was considered, and Byrnes had proposed the commission. Today British Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevm finally registered London's approval of the pact proposal. France already has accepted tile proposal. U. S. Secretary of State James F. Byrnes, described by his associates as deeply discouraged by i the failure of the conferees to| reach any basic agreement dur-1 Major Seeks (Washington Man To Spend Last Confesses To 19 Dors wrt^ ^ Armed Robberies Police, FBI Arrest Hardesty at Foundry; Fled State Prison A 28-vear-oVd foundry worker CRIES AFTER CIRCUS EQUIPMENT BURNS - Edwardo Zac-chini (right), cries as he is questioned by police after his "Human Cannon.'' which he uses in a circus act to shoot his daughter Victoria into the air. collided with a gasoline truck in Gary, Ind.. and burned. Zacchini. who was driving the truck with the cannon mounted on the rear enroute from Chicago to Detroit, estimated his loss at $50,000.   (AP Photo) 26 Die in Airliner Crash; Army Plane Rams Hillside San Francisco, UP)-A tall, rud- j dy army ofiicer, determined to spend the remaining years of his life by the side of his wife in a Carville, La., leprosarium, was undaunted today by unofficial word from CarviUe that his -re-j quest prqbably would be denied. This possible set-back came as who escaped from the Washing- '.friends of 65-year-old Maj. Hans tcm 3tale penitentiary at Walla -George Hornbostel. a veteran of n   r ...  ,                   ,,,u, two wars, pushed his petition m ^ alia July 4. 1944 with another ^Washington.   Surgeon   General convict, came to the end of tn� ! Thomas Parian was among those trail in Manitowoc late Wednes- with whom the probably unprei- day afternoon, cedented request was taken up. He was picke(1 up 1)v Malljt0. Mrs. Hornbostel, who is o2, de- ,- j i-ni ,. . veloped skin trouble while she woc P�' . exposure! Although she suspect- his life of crime, ed leprosy while at Santo Tomas. Hardesty. who submitted to ar the confirmation was obtained rest at the Wisconsin Aluimnun here only a week ago. Foundry plant shortly after  :ears J1' I doubts about his decision to join had been free- aftcr scaling the Accident Occurs After Take-off Pilot and Co-Pilot Telephone For Aid Fairfax, Calif., HJPt- An army learn-: s themselves to formulate   , Mr. Truman said the two fold ber to speaj( on tne seCrecv rule, pan foi- Indian independence, Wm M�y felt, after overnight con- ^ he wanted it agreed that rule j tinued effort to compromise the * Richmond, Va., {.�1- Twenty six persons were killed today in four-engine B-17 with eight pei-the crash of a southbound char- sons aboard ran out of gas and tered airliner which ran into crashed into a hillside thr*e trouble a few minutes after its miles west of here early today, ing three weeks of negotiations. |takeoff from Byrd airport near (critically injuring the pilot and was said to be convinced there : Richmond;and plunged^into _a :co-pilot was no other coulee except con- rain-drenched    stand   of   pinel   Fate of the others was not im- his wife at the leper colony "I don't consider mysalf an> martyr by asking to be with her as long as we both shall live," he said. "I'd be unhappy without her and she'd be unhappy without me, and that's all there is to it." He envisioned his own future at Carville: "I've done a lot of things in my life. I've written stories: I've been a|mine superintendent; I've been an explorer and a department head; and Tve served in wall at night at the Walla Walla and an interim government to towoc ta.mt- Plo";ed through the that six persons some of whom | ^ T?en pollce or even a mis" e�?U"f 1 the conferees were readv to re-'?ee? and burned on the soggy'-were alive at that tune,  were, sl�nar>�_______=n ^ _ ,r \ESS Andrei A. Gromyko, Soviet ^"^Establishment of a federal!   Representatives of the Brother- fa^h� I*'u^^^                                                                                 ,      f            .       ,                          . .          ..   .     . union of India embracing both 1 hoods of Trainmen and Locomo- febSl0n tfda>- "T tt'tn n,!;.co1; ce^s as soon as discussion of the banks of 3 creek onl-v a   few trapped in the big bomber. what if known as British India! tive Engineers said the railroad lea?ues            Ahe rule wlthout Srman oue.tion          Hm.'heri thousand yards from the airport.;   Fourth air force headquarters     .married 33 years ago feels the The blue-eyed.52-year old wife ASKS STRIKE CURB Washington, IS3'-Civilian Production Adminis t r a t o r John D. Small asserted today John L. Lewis has thrown industry into "chaos" and called for legislation outlawing strikes for at least six months. Small said in a statement that Lewis, president of the United Mine Workers, "pulled the switch on American industry." 'Lacking any sign that labor will now agree voluntarily to a holiday from strikes x x x. or that management will agree to voluntary arbitration. I am forced, as a private citizen, to the reluctant conclusions that legislation is urgently required." Small said. He added, however, that hasty legislation "written and debated in the heat and rancor of an emergency is almost always apt to be bad legislation." further discussion. Gromyko walked into the council chamber alone and was seated when the session began at 9:05 a. m. Manitowoc time. ! The new French deleyat ~~v~-~-~~^~~>~^~>~~>~n~~~~> vote, call for reconsideration of after thev offered a modified the constitution after the first 10 wage increase proposal and the ___ .______ failed to touch upon the issue. No specific terms for setting up the welfari fund were outlined. ^ uuiumiuu creek only German question    is    finished, thousana yari probablv today                              The airliner leit Newark, N. J., reported the plane, bound from : same w a>. In rece-sinel the foreign min- earl-v lasl "V8"1 for Atlanla-   It Los Angeles to Hamilton field, Wife Wants Him            ' isters will leave   unsettled   the Putintou Rit*n??nd and.to�k ot{ ran �u} �J �as and placed the -Hans is ready now to be re-1 same problems   which   impelled aga'" about 12:30 a.m. m heavy time of the crash at about 2:50 tired from the service/. she said, their current session-the ques- weather. The ceiling at the air- a.m. Manitowoc time. in ner hospital room, filled with prison, he had used his own name. Harold Ray Hardwly Hon of Austria, which the Rus-'P01'1   was,,lluft"atlngJ  be?ween .. FoV se.ve!'ai ""HT se5ich Par: roses brought bv her husband without an alias. In that span he sians flatlv refused even to dis- zero and 2?� fe�t and ysibility ties hunted for the wr e c k e d  ..He savs he.s h'ad his f]i     ; wa? at Denve, Detroit. Seattle, cuss: Trieste, which Britain and wTmeT'e whef she took off. p ane which did not burn, and  life and thal he wants t0 ^ �ith and Minneapolis, the United States msis. m,, ,,!   The CAA said the plane car- at 6:1a aan. Manitowoc time call- ico still was represented by Rafael to Ital; De La Colina. sitting instead of it must go to Yugoslavia: free, the newly-appointed permanent delegate. Luis Padilla Nervo. The council immediatelv took jup the proposed rulos and there jwas no opportunity for Austral- ; ian Delegate Paul Hasluck to ask Gromyko how he thought his absence from the council scissions affected his Big Five veto power and what legal effect he believed it had on meetings of a short-handed. 10-nation council. The Russian delf gate boycotted the session last week in protest against renewed discussion of the now . issue. ailed States insist must go! . 1.ne,>AA Sa'� Ps Cal !rf , , u , 11 . (Continued on Page 19. Col. 3) y while the Russians insist i        24 Paf engers and ^a crew ed for torches to cut through the^ -_J- i of two. A farmer, Willaim Wal ;ton who lives near the scene in plane's hull to the flapped men. Hamilton field reported it was aboard dom of navigation on the Dan-i,T                            .          . .     ,, ube. which the Russians refuse to �eTco c0""ty' sa'l he counted presumed   all   persons write into   the   Balkan   peace 26 bod.es-20 men, three women, were army men treaties: and international free- and          children.           _____ The  pilot  and dom of commerce with Romania, Bulgaria and Hungary. Welfare Fund is Chief issue in Coal Parley New York, .-Pi-Establishment co-pilot  were County Police Sergeant H. W. taker? to the Hamilton field hos-Henshaw went into the crash pital. and a public relations offi-area and counted 24 bodies. 20 cer said they w-ere too severely in the wreckage and four more injured to give a coherent aeon the ground near the charred count of the crash. He said one airliner. Most of the bodies were had a fractured skull and the badly burned, he said, and there:other a broken jaw among other was a possibility only one could injuries. U.S. Eating Way To New Record Post Mark Despite Fats, Grain Shortage non-from years and at intervals of 10 years carriers rejected it. of a union-controlled health and be readily identified, welfare fund-the same demand    In Ne\v York City, airmen said which has stvmied ' negotiations Viking   Air   Transport   Co.. in the soft coal industrv-emerg- Glendale.  Calif., operated quiescent Russian - Iranian ed today as a leading is'sue in the scheduled air carriers _ anthracite contract talks. .Grand    Central    air    terminal,; The AFL United Mine Work-;Glendale,   Calif.,   to   Phoenix,. coal   operators   in   a   Five-page from L03 Angeles to  Kansas statement made oublic yesterdav , City, St. Louis, Chicago, Mem-fa/ Thomas J. Kennedy, UMW'Pnis- New Orleans and Los.An secretary-treasurer, after four geles. previous negotiating sessions had Confesses Detroit 'Job' Questioned after his arrest yesterday by Police Chief J. J. Kup-lic, Detectives Frank Tomchek and Elmer Scherer and Elmer Madson, FBI agent at Green Bay, Hardesty admitted his. escape from the Washington state prison, after serving two years of a 20-. year term, but was "mum" on . the Detroit job.  This noon, how-! ever, under more grilling, he con-I fessed the robbery of the safe in the Mills Bakery company office in Detroit, where he was former- afterward. Wine'Incident' Brings $50 Fines I   Washinglon, uP,_The United ,     ,      ..      .      ,,,_ IStates today is eating itself into � employed on August 12, 194a ja new record for per capita food; f.e �^tained 54.542.12 in cash and consumption, despite shortages inlsl', '�� checks. I grains and fats at home, and a , Ha.rdesty is being held as a Milwaukee, iff, -The legality Y world abroad. j furtive from j�^ice and ^, ie �l unncc wane worK-;"*""""".* i 0f the candidacv of C^cuit Judee1 That 15 ^ 8lst of a report PiobBOly be turned over to the made the demand upon hard ;Houston and New Orleans_ _a^d' Joseph RMcCarth'    - Appfeton from the bureau of agricultural!*^ byManitowoc_policy for re- 0f Debate Legality of McCarthy Candidacy for for the Republican U. S. senator ,vas economics, which bases its fore-,tnrn ,0 w.aI,P Wal]a prison to Army Asks Draft of Men 25 To 29 )ective Shortage Results in Request Washinglon, Operator, Bartender In Court Appearance Mrs Emily Stanul, operator of Sfrike Set For Saturday In the railroad development. A. F. Whitney, president of the Brotherhood of Railroad, Train-|men. said the nationwide,work stoppage of 250.000 trainmen and 'locomotive engineers was still Stanul's Bar. Two Rivers, ana set far 3 p.m. Manitowoc time her bartender. Raymond Suid-I Saturday. zinski. were each fined 550 and Prncnorlive ^linrlnno Whitney and Alvanlev John- costs bv Judge Bert Larkin in rf05petnve jnortuge    ston    nead   of   tne   Engineers police court at Two Rive.-s this '� union, told reporters they offered morning. a modified wage increase pro-    The   pair   pleaded   guilty   to ,;Pi _ The army'posal for a minimum increase of charges growing out of the sale has asked President Truman to $1+4 a day as compared with of a quart of wine to a juvenile direct t.\e drafting of men aged their original demand of S2.50 a member of the Elkhart Lake 25 through. 29. The request wasiday. high   school   band,   during   the made because of a prospective    They said both sides would re- music festival at Two Riveis last replacement   shortage   resulting port K> President Truman thai Saturday. from the stop-gap revision of the I they were unable to agree. Siudzinski  was charged with ------   .._ selective service act. a war de-i Also attending the morning1 the actual sale of intoxicating li- Temnero�.lr'e- Drnn' partment official said today. White House coal conference quor to the minor, while Mrs. ' ="'V^,U,U,C3 u,uHi He said the president might were Secretary of Labor Schwelr Stanul's charge was permitting Cold Spell To Last 2 Youths Die in Auto Accident Two are Seriously Injured Early Today cast for a circuit judge running Authorities Probe Death of Woman, 55 Sun Prairie. i.-P'-Dane county authorities    were    investigating today tin death of Mrs. Barbara tu Mautz. 55. who was killed in a ^ee youths were killed and tw0 constitution, governs the elec fall from a moving truck driven others injured seriously early to- ____it-.. -1_       ------ =   nilitoH cast of record-breaking domestic1 complete his term. Tik. T,LaI'- hv iwv food consumption in 1946 on the,   Hls. Wlfe- w"� wa^ 1'ving with i �L fi' At  tc^ii gear's statistics to date and the h'm     a two-room apartment at Ln^nTrnevs J'        prospects for the coming months.: 2008 Marshall .street, and is em- wl!^nt �k� oi-n �.>l- tv,� The bureau, a branch of thclP1^ ln a side laundry, is Steans. who also  seeks  the; department,   -said'not being detained.   She was memhi^f the ?vm, r uh .hit'bimper quantities of most foods brought to the station this morn-T e\lP�f.i ,hnepnT^m� ?llinS?.!*� expected to be available to'hi* for questioning and insisted of lotion terTofqar icTe sevenmeet the nation's unprecedented, she knew nothing of her hus-?he^e co^utton'thr votolfP^ But it predicted never-i band's robbery activities.   Har- theless that consumer demandsi desty told the officers that he did for' anything'except 'judic'iaTwi" ou.trun supplies. not confide to his wife that he office shall be void Xt estlmated the per capita vol- was an escaped convict. Kellv, who. is supporting Mc- ume  LMtiQaj.                         hvo heavy ughtpoles after leav- the- v   g   constitutlon prevails ever- to drop below the yearly-made his escape from the prison ing the road on a curve. .... The  dead  were  William Coroner E announced he A. Fischer, who would hold an in- the V. S. constitution prevails , , .    , and thai there is nothing in that average level because of season- in company witn Edward Yager, quest, said Mautz stated his wife pither fell or jum cab of the truck. "supreme  law of the land" to 7rt fTm*ZSiTrUnS- ViT-* r�; Prevent the McCarthy candTdacyJ^1 Products potatoes, sw ped from the and George W. Rumsey, 20. The" McCarthv has th. ^ndorspm^t (potatoes, meats, fats, sugar, c; injured were Milo G. Ffaten Jr., 21, and Lennox Birckhead, 21, Flaten suffered internal injuries. Birckhead face and leg cuts and possible internal injuries. They were confined to St. Alphpnsus last ^niaht hosP'tal at Port Washington. \ Wallace  Hoffman* Cedarburg McCarthy has the endorsement of the state Republican organization. � The Weather act today. Officials have estimat-; lenbach   and    Edward ;F.   Mc a minor to loiter and remain on ed that the" existing pool of men Grady, special government con- the. premises.   Both   defendants     Temperature* droDDed to 43 de in me 25-29 age group totals only ciliator. indicated their intention to pav; -refK jn Manitowoc about 15.005. None would disclose immedi-    The appearance of the pair in wUh even'cooler weather predict- The army will continue after ately what was discussed at' the .court todav was brought about ed for tonieht bv thn weather June 30 to! discharge men with, conference. after an 18-year-old member of, bureau    \X noon' it was 50 de- two years of service or a point1   Whitney   said   the   operators' the  Elkhart  Lake  high  school.Biee<   Northern   Minm.^ta   rp  speed of the vehicle at more than score of 40. 'can make no prom- offered nothing beyond the $1.28 band had purchased a bottle of D0It:d in  and sidm.murn guaranteed  annual  wage Simmon, oar ostimatprf the    G**"*1}? and Fn- ilnilk products. and tnat his United Steelworkers day. Slightly cooUr south and;   The bureau said 1946 produc-union would consider a demand central portions tonight with|tion o{ ioo^ crops and livestock is that kind of pay in 1947 contract 'a7v"wm'd blew"of7the he took "P the P""uit when the {"Ef"!r,d fT1 *�eP* a,lr L�*:now estimated to be about one- negotiations. ____,,AC of todav as citizens simmons cai- roared; through an Michigan. , third above the average for 1935-,   "It is the opinion of your offi- the .continued to pile coal into their'arterial at a 8Peed he estimated Hourly temperatures from 1 p. 39. If'this estimate proves cor-leers that the steer industry can ---- f ~, es - m. yesterday until noon today,;rect, 1946 food production would'-1----- "-- t^-1-1 -�-=-'---- : at 65 miles per hour. Hoffman said he chased the jby the Herald-Times recording 2 p.m. SO 3 p.m. SO 4 p.m. 47 POSTPONE TRIAL other car south out of Cedarburg Bad Nauheim, Germany, {JP)-Ion the Hamilton road. After two The trial of Col. James A. Kilian! miles he slowed for; a curve of Highland Park, 111., former I which. the other machine failed commander of the Lichfield re- to negotiate. All four youths were' | Pjjj- J| inforcement depot where Amer- thrown from, the car.j Simmons!7 p!m! 45 ican   prisoners   declared   t h e y I was killed outright and Rumsey I� ���>- ** were treated brutally, was post- died in the hpspital several hours.   The high mark a year ago to-poned until June 17. later. [day waa 54, the low 36. thermometer: 1 p.m. 51       8- p.m. 44 5 tun. 44 10 p.m. 44 t kju. 45 11 p.m. 44 7 im. 47 Midnight 44 S ksn. 49 1 a.m. 44 9 �-m. 51 2 a.m. 45 10 Jum. 53 3 a.m. 44 11 ajn. 54 4 a.m. 44 Noon 50 about equal that of 1943 and be exceeded only slightly by the record production in 1944 and 1945 pioneer in the,field of minimum guaranteed wages," Murray told the Steelworkers' third biennial convention yesterday. The CIO leader said he favor- Government limitations onled an annual wage determined -1:--* n-------1 _4i-----'fey collective bargaining over one; fixed by legislation. He was re-> no significant effect, the bureaujjferring to a presidential commit*! .....tee currently studying th* feast-1' said, upon per capita nutritive' aupplies for the year as a whpleJbilitjr tt saSk 'la*.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication