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Manitowoc Herald Times Newspaper Archive: January 26, 1940 - Page 1

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Publication: Manitowoc Herald Times

Location: Manitowoc, Wisconsin

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   Manitowoc Herald-Times (Newspaper) - January 26, 1940, Manitowoc, Wisconsin                                -        L _�       b_l  _mm. 1    L _     _u________�_-    �--m i     M^^^MjflP it . 1 ......1       m- -    f 4 :3 f A f 1 ,     ify-* , * �  ,-     ...    i .   *   m       .    �;,�' ',1 C,     V.  fc, -7-,    *\ T � ft I C rvL o 0 �   *; v 0 i**P r- -   - 1 h t     t r     - H     % +*    - r^ - w THE WEATHER +   ^    -    - -    + ft    rr - ^ ^/ 4 ^* Un��ttltd ton I q ht; continued 1 14 14 ... J 'A h _ n.  >. * *L  I X -J ^-"     ~ t-- *   ^--^  >*^-      - ---l--__ i   - -* -  4 ^   "J.     r       \t ..... T on Two Fronts To SibmIiT^ P     . r--" ^ t Finn Defenses Jlai^A Spoil In Soothern Frf1     - 4 Scuttled Since .   States Are Colder Today War Than The North .4 �� .With the-FUmlAti- forco In luplaod^. Unu�u�1   Rus- �fin-ictivlfy oh tfie^hltth^iy eiatt from Markajarvi, whort Invading forces: rallied �fttr retreating from midway acroee Flnlend, was aeen by Finns today aa pointing to resumption of the general -retreat. r �.- r  h      x _ HELSINKI, UP)-Soviet Rueetan Tories W two fronts hayc failed in attempts to smash through Fin* land^dofenaoa and are In difflcul* ilea. JTlniiishjreDiirta 'juld-'todOi-. Military authorities reported Red army divisions had been stopped at Alttojokl and Killaanjpkl, on the front northeast of Lake. Ladoga, In drives to relieve large Russian forcea virtually Isolated nearKlteia. In Laptanxlranother large Russian force seemed to be In difficulty n comrnunlque said, an enemy attack i'was repuraedT" ~ " ------------------~" This indicated an Unsueetssful counterattack on the Bella front about 50 miles from-the Russian, frontier^ -Retreating to Marajarrl some days ago after abandoning a drive intended to cut through Fin* lend*s narrow waist, s> R�d army force of 40,000 men lad been forced to wage rear-gnard warfare. -- ---Face- -Staryatlw--_~ ------- Unofficial accounts said about 0,-000 Runainns were In peril of starvation in_Uxa Salla-dislrfc4 and that Russian warp tunc* �v*?r� attempting BETRLIN, (fl3)-The Newspaper Drotscbe Allgemeine Zeitung said today that the crews of 17 of 18 German merchant ships halted by British warships since the war began had succeeded iri scuttling their ships and the eighteenth was Lade so immsw^-flKFlle British had * Id sink her. The newspaper praised German seamen for- "fulfillment of duty to the fatherland1* in not permitting ships to fall into British hatiosr" \ , ATLANTA,  Ga,; cold waves sent temperatures of the traditionally sunny south below those of much of the northern Unit* ed States today. End Cu Communist Flag Lowered Over Lewis | Suggests Labor R was; colder in Birmingham than f ians In Boston; solder In Atlanta than] in Atlantic City; colder In Nashville than New York city, - Birmingham had a mlnlmintn reading of five below zero, Boston 16; Atlanta's was three, to 10 In AtlanUc^CiLy^Naahyillfi residents ahlvered la 13-below weather while New York had 14 above-and no) relief was in sight for the cotton i belt before Sunday/ ' - j Unused To Cold From the icy channel of tho Mississippi to inow-blocked roada" Hi Virginia, a people unused to severe J cold were buffeU^^y^-weathcr whi^b 4 u mh\ed-hmg� btantflrig-winier-records. _] L . .       + j            * h - I*     + L-   - War Record To Be At Suke In General Elections OTTAWA, (iP)-Political leaders 8etjup.campaign machinery today for the most hectic electioneering battle TnZO years as a resultof He dominion government's call for a * ! The average January tempera-1 fure in Atlanta this, year has been 32 degrees, a pa Inst the previous low average of ZAA reached In Feb- 0*1 *  W FT �s?v- I +w V Calling for an end of New Deal policftnr to prevent deflation and realisation of the heed for Amer-to "face th9 music" resulting from 20.yeaxa nf Artificial IneULOds to keep up pricesr Phil 8. Hanna, editor of the Ctiicago Journal of Comrxierce, told the Manitowoc Chamber of Commerce last night Aal--'the-day  is-coming-when rrnertca Will have a broad and sound  business expansion/'    i:" "When that day is to arrive, I am not capable of saying/' Mr. Samia declared. "But it will come we   can   put  an   end   to  pa* naccas." Mr. Hahua delivered the prlh/ cljiHi Hiltlrpsji at, thoirCbambBr~:of Commerce's snnual dinner meet* ing at the Elk's Club last night iat which- newiyL. elected  office -  T ruaryr 1895.        -- Peninsular  Florida,  tourist treat, had much lower temperatures last night than forecast, heavy frost hr-Tttrtrs- gloves and - truck-fields catching many growers unprepared. PHIL tf. HAftMA general Tote to put try war- record \ ^ru^rTmen  satd-^be^ could  not up to the people. In a swift-moving drants which surprised many members, pari la* ment was dissolved late yesurday ascertain at once whether the prod nets suffered serious damage. Jacksonville's low reading was 24: Miami's 37. SuUicro -^tempexaturcs ware re- in thft soulhtrasl. wbtjre wava after wave of Russians were ssld to have charged across the fro ten lakes ofi the riank bf the Manner-helm line in a costly effort to rw�rh s%* marooned fnr^e at Kttris. rinns pictured the Red army on.a-tre> mendous treadmill; 81n�e-tbe war started, they said, the Russians have sent men and machines agninst the Finns in re- 4 n The.,.a.rifiMiL_cepfirt... of the Chsmber of Commerce, featuring reports on committee activities of the past year, was presented to persons attending last hfghVi banquet. The report was bound In a heavy yel-tow~cover. A review of commit^ L ,1 tee activities found In the. report is printed In tonight's Herald-Times on page- 3. �vtrtnally-at: Their starttng place. -MKy�i if tVre were no Flnniah soldiers there," one foreign military expert here ctmrmented; ilttre places Into which the Russian mechanised divisions are vnnturlng-at this time of year would call for genius on the Tweedsmulr calling for an early "direct and unquestioned mandate from the people" The   earliest  possible   election d�t* is March 26. -Canadian election   laws require an eight-week period between dissolution and election day. Puta lUTo Peepie Prime Minister W. L. MacKentie peated assaults .but..have remain**} I King- announced"in"parHiment .ilNtt.i FBj .ih. �   m-S*  -r ^'1       '    � t h      * J       "i-r r T �^r-r-    t i commanders to get their men home again unfrozen and nnstarrcd;- "Different Situation** "Remember, it takea e whole train-Jnad of food3ty Just- icy Wd^bnrn's attacks (Contlnupil on Page 9, Col. 3) PolticaJ Conventioiu c6untryj_)'ot forecasters said there was a tendency__toward   warmer weather, enpeciniiy in the far west. -����IfcfreT Wont., with -25, was the _ coldest snot on the weather map, |   n..cniYrTAV   /nyi New Englauders shivering in! Jr^'r"^' {^--Chicago, freezing temperatures found con-1 g^ladelphU, St. Ixjuis andI San siderable consolation  in the fact: J^ramrfscir haTB notified the Demo- that condltlons.wero good for win- ! jral �= "dJ^p""i^fS^2^i ter anortain compariaun with.;UiosG^~******* f^ fte-tttttanalj found by sun-hunting tourists in : inventions of the two^ major par- the now frosty south. jUe*' A '       . Top ton, N, C. turned In a local >   Oihera may enter the competition Aiso  present was  Xhomaa-eon-+ ru:    Dl    T   ikj_it    mi.,?     if nor, area manager of the U; S. Ulltt:JCitn IO mtrrm (HUOnai  census, who asked cooperaUou o \ io^Vbuai     ^ and j^dos^ai ^tkn _ _______ ___ ____________ ....._____  �� conventions of the two lie Was prepared to allow the people of this country to say whom they want to administer the coun-j � \ 7- tAT^t* try^ In view of recenl" ateac�roT1 oegrees below xero last j Canada's war prog ram/ j night; ntTaon City and in Lhe current business census, 200 Attend Dinner Thomas McKeough, retiring president of the Chamber__pf Com merce, opened the meeting and then turned Jt over to 12..XL Badg-^ uewty ctifCte4-pr�ssWCTt^~Otlrer officers who took over their duties last night were; Alois Ftschl, 3r, Brevard i p robe IS "PpllUcsL. opponents   who   are ga^ttog to andimpine eroor ��fect that la put forward by this admtn-latraUon,", were blamed by Mac-Kanafa King- for the necessity of election. Apparently he referred to Ontario * Premier   Mitchell   Hep: on alleged  ineffi cienry In the   dominion   govern-ffienC* prosecution of the war. Hepbuni told his provincial leg-isiature a week sro that Canadian troops were Ul-�qulp|>ed r.nd he � pushed through a mutlou censuring j the *'little effort" made in tbe war | ]by The otnwa' regime.' registered 14 degrees below; Mur- \ Merest *n the capital with Phyjmd Cani^hadA3 iM'll^Sfe   ^I^F T firsL. vice-yrealdent;   Clarence R� Talk of convention cities-shared  $\U R^.ouu *os>p�arl^ii^  K. I* ^w,wut Plouss.^trcasuror;   and   Thomas ion low.   Mt. Mitchell, highest peak |�srjTJTOr-j^tospo east of the Rockies, had to be con- j 1^ a speech in Co ambus, Ohio. | predicting an "Ignominious defeat" he tant with a paltry 8 below. Those are mountain towns but ! for PrwWeni RooseveU. should Salisbury and Anderson. Sf C\ in I h* re-nomlnatcd the heart of LhaHI^munt had zero [   ^      \ --^k^      �      *f * readings,  with many other Pied-11 S1ec.ru�/Yy Tikv'*'oni- of Ul� fmont ctt^s reporting only siightlr'thlraaerin -ftdvowit.es, told re-(higher lemperalurvs. ' .-porters  yesterday  that  he  hojied i    niri   timnn   were   hanl   put   to: l-^w** �  "better union  man treasurer. iMcKeougu, EmU A/Weber. Alex kgifldair sod- Th^g>as K^^Ueddtn, \ three   year   directors!*   E.     Ar f Mackey, asaoclate director of 4� -ir r�i COLUMBUS, Ohio,   (ff) - 8* Burton K. Wheeler (IVMotit) nri. today that the government ealtt^ gether leaders of industry, agrtoiK-ture and.labor to work out a_I0te. tion to tho nation's social andaeo*7 nomic problems. - . ' in an address prepared for tna-United Mlno Workers ot Amerlca- convenilon.-Wh eeler �1AJo6�^S8L be found for the nearly"10,OOa,W unemployed and the pnrchastof power"of the farmer must be lifr creased^ieforo this nation1 can proa* He did not mention his presidential candidacy in the pared address, but at one point ferred to himself as "a candidate for re-election to the United States senate in 19i0/�. _ Need Cooperation     ______ "No ona solution Is availaWa at the present time-nor is any one group or organiwttion in a posfti^ mcomtnpnd-a.-apecific prj to be readily accepted by all the hers^-the senator declared^-y-^r "The jgoverntaent, therefore, must sume the leadership. AndtoTHi end the national leaders of lnd _ u Jm try. agriculture anTrTa5c$ shoUld be called together to meet, an? co^Bri and recommend a programby which we may achieve industrial democ* racy and economic and social lecnr* L "h  -f unsolved and comparatively bed"     as America's Kfcl -There cannot he any p�rMiliwR; prosperity or industrial peace when mlUions are unemployed ~^fadnf ffering and misery;" he asserted. T*Wer in this country nave, _ a policy^ of...mtrlcilnL.R!oibSS tltttsitttet.RtSfil* ,**~ ha 'cuntlanedir been nnable to maa^ the twffliw* doua-scientific discoveries of>0y the � w elf are -of ^ttrtr- ^w" pie. We hftvo managed our fiCMH omy so thatit either produces too ucbor too little. hi. the  j I district census office, introduced The United Mine Workers convention at Columbus was t^rxiwn to confusion when a red hammer-and sickle flaajA" suddenljr was } Old timers trump those. Mr. Connor. Also present at tho speaker** table   were   Mead_____XvL x,e*Uaatiatt. Hansen, secretary, .at...the   Cham-T    ^   ��"; bcr of Commerce; William Peter] son, Stale Chamber of. Commerce ! official, and Has^bld  M. Kuypexa. j lowered from tbe stage rafters over the heaoT of John whtle^ the CIO chieftain wasrspeaking* Jbewis demanded a L. Lewis police in* -F f  '            : cratic party had let labor down, ; said at a press conference that she; thaught. tho admtnistratiw - "has ; kept faith with labor" and that -"there is no drawing bark from auy ; progrnm that I know about/'.. Wheeler Chief Waaits in Power? Commerce embers   and   their r I AUSTIN. Tex.. (A3) - Dr. W, J. Johnson, 66-year-old superintendent of .the; Sagl_aulonin siatj!L:lusspltat for the insane, was pictured today | done to   tho   buildinRS. as-exiWHHl�a~^Hmftblo^ably   morelchlefljf-Jiy achool teschors, -fr-ota- his w^*n -employes   than)-   Piraman-Watson-.- UulUtard, carrying out their duties as nurses. I collapsed from smoke   while t night drove 100 tenants from aj larae apartment house and sent j two flrement to hoMpitals for treatment. About fi'o.ooo damaae avas occupied -  i �+ U-BoaU Believed In The Vicin-; Foreign Nation Can't ity of Trinidad Enlist Men In U.S. WASHIXGTONT. (VF>-Prrsuhiit Roosevelt said today that no loi -.NKW YOUK, (JV- Liahtnina U-40, i boat attack against French and flv .British shipping In the West Indies Five young women. All formerly j'nee^wHne: a ladder from the third j area of i_he Tan-American neutrality j elan nation legally could maintain on his staff, declared Dr. Johnson had made Improper advatuVs. They testified at. a heuring conducted by tho Hoard of Com mi on charge by | , i.axe..now: ^ruwliiix. in the \ hiiulijr of j Trinidad (Port of Spain), a tourist j resort in the British West Indies, after having run the Hritlsh block- floor, fell asainst a truck and frac-) ���o is' forseeu in reliable inaiitimej an enlistment srryicw lit this bouu� : tnn ~world~ ftrhti, tl^e-  'American enll�t-1 |laa i. BOft ^er.ause the Crosse, 40, head of the rescue r Thre* German., subinariues, ten- j ing in a foreign armed service  half has to" huv to carrv squad-, was overcome by nmoke.     j dered by a Germnn paascMVger liner, ! would Tone his cltiscnship unless � riphi'in* *um* -.wives and guesta atLeudett- Uaa din^ uer meeting, the largest  in  the history of the organization. While  there  is  an  overaupply people- whw-TMktt- Uls of the economic system, there ; are few "who can tell what to | do about It in a way that will ' aecui'e papular support" Mr.! Hatmst-said aa he opened his talk;4 . TTlie" trouble U that we had 1 a long sjm>11 of oa*y Uvlug,** he : continued.   "We   were   placed   ou : the receiving end, with Kurope do- j ing the pay lug. in 1911. When hair ] her h*it fighting on. But Charges to Be "It Is time to wisdom and the American people___________ -manager our economic life a�tfr*l j InnU^pisce of restriction w%:tMff� r e*pansrofi of production: In the place of artificial prices we hare � constant lowering of the cost of 1W-1 Ing; In the place of recurrent sunt* j downs and unemployment wa hare !a Bteady leveT of* production linl ; jobs; in the place of id mJfflei-: : unemployed we hive a busy s bodied population while our ycratlT i are educated and pur seed retired C  - COLUMBIA.-OhiorW Burton K. Wheeler, long considered a friend of labor, came here today to address tho United Mino Senator 1 io security. re Workers of America and- atlmuiat-.. " r5^.. ed speculation" on the quesUon:    Asia not be wP^h!��i^fc -Is Wheeler the man John L.1**** attention   from lfeport* He said he would "nererrwlt ta: send an American hoy acrosa the water to fight on foreign sptf* aftd  ^ _   aw .   � SS ^BBBBSa * . * � - 1 T r   t ^4, Lewis wants in the White House?" *'in my. judgment,  if President Report on Highway Protc T� Be Submitted Soo the -Hair -Anti�n to M1 ti tat .urn' "Assrj-i elation that Johnson was morally unfit for tho posit inm Ator*- witnesses were called twiay. Denies Cbarftss The tall, partly-bald doctor denied ; the allegations, issued a statement ; -that lh�_eha\\Ke* were ."falie.sjid I Acts As Own Lawyer To Help Select i NEW YORK IIP)- Jerry ScotL of sTandHiouiv," a*ht a*fte-H^d he .was j Tulsa.-Okla.. fwmera^tor and form tho victim of n conspiracy to oust er New him. York   manager   of the Foundation Flan, Inc. acted as his \ Miss Ituby He.pton. an attractive own attorney yesterday to help se bruueU tola ih� three�msn board -lect-a jury to try him on a charge her to get her jab and that he had of conspiring to violate the securi* fop dirt] and pcUrd herifnttt sheTe= "ties art of I^^t 3cott was a Htif I -i----1 t--------^ ..j WBJ| of ^ (Jnnt M jhf| it,|v^rft|ty of Wisconsin 4 Ih     �-  ar j ^mmmmmmmmmi ^ ma - mi ^r j. k. >4   �-  w mm   mr  m  ^ -|  �   r ..     � t t 4        m. rx m  9  rf  .r 1 " ^     A  � - �^p-tB-V mi m  �   � i ^hi -    ^ - v     mr for three years. signed becRUBe TiiR annoyed by him. Expires Between U.S. and Janan ade, thes?� source* said. lender the plan outlined by these observers   the   submarines   would kn aUgTiXnlng blow against BrtM would be expatriated if they en-laKandFrwuclilsblps c-arrying grafn V'HMtHf ift-4hr--catra* of "any" �f""the and other foods and fuel oil to KuK-TTjellTgcrent nations ami swore land.   ^ ! awav Ttielr ollegiance to the tint- Vftal Oil Ports T vu States. A huge Standard Oil ivflnt-r Ik ; located near Trinidad on the talaud : of A rub a, orf Lha Venerudan coast. | RTtri-other rttnl trtt ports �nd tourist j t*Plra�urcr spots are -nnarhy. : Effective U boat warfare in this : area-which also Is near the sea � lanes leading to the Panama Canal - would deal a harusstng-blow to i the ailtes. It was said Hrltish warships have ! been making drastic efforts to lo* fcato the undersea raiders. ho. Uiuk au o�ib of all^piaiu.to that government, An  informal opinion  from  the attorney   general*   dated   Sept em* iM^r 5, mado It clear that solicits lion of enlistments In this country was  banned and  that Americans j 7hin*7To Europe at "our own pile-| but he refused to disclose the na- j \ie WASHINGTON, (/P)-Preel-dent Roosevelt once more turned aside third-term inquiries today, Including a request for comment on John L. Lewit' predlcilbn of ^Qnb'mrnToua defeat" if he were a 1940 candidate. Mr. Roosevelt asked reporters to give one good reason why he should answer an inquiry of that kind. � t mestlc problems. "Our energies mast he j to fluding ways to aire the v j era-and-thtr workers ! power that will keep our factories i running - - not arW-per cent j at 100 per cent all the tM*,* j declared. -- VI. F.D. R. Boys Ss Ait  mm s^smaalhsMi sisssi m rer afsssaets WASHINCTON, Prasiftftt Roosevelt isn't go.ing to attend* hat in a j��ittig mood he bought wants- the  nomination ;      �Vie^eUJ^w f0,*^   , " Wheeler told a i Lincoln Day banquet In UUnoUs. i S       * * Through a secretary. StephStt frb' Order Certain Parts df Fifi MAHUSOX, W -Augu*t Frcy,j director of the state division of de-j partmental research, said today he j when the fighting stops and the.:.:..w'JL>uliL!:.Dr.gfer charges and make rec- [ fighters go to work, we nerd a j ommendatttws"fi�r -t^eHeln rbangea." \ readjustment. T4*at is what hsp- } in a report to Governor. Hell on his: pened between Europe aud tho I investigation of the Stato Highway i United States.*  Department- I -Between   1914   and   1921.   th* :    Krcy announced his report would; speaker said. America sold every-1 be submitted sometime next week, \ rtoo**velt I but be refused to disclose the na*M|e ys\\\  pt,t   it. 1 iiue .ol. the. charaea^or .aaaluet ^hpm j .^..^r^f.,, ---------------------- "~    :TJrdn*t Face The Music T thty-VQuid :te pre!erred.   He alsoi   -|f he -wants th* ii�mmaiian-h� : Rarly, he sent word that he "When   1921  came and Europe j declined to discuss the changes he should say bo. If he does not want ! the dinner would be a success an . went back to work w� didn't face 1 would propose. 'n he should sav ko. * I ihat the speaker-Rep, rluxnley i thc music." Mr. Hanna declared.! ' Held" "He a ring a" PrWnlsster Irks Lewis : VU-~wtlt make the subject "The  first   brain  trust  came  U\ -    Th* Tlesear^h - 'Department- .-held ; - -f he Montana' i^mocraf-s appear : *J-to-. him ^-howctn. toll     , ; then and said: 'Don't let the prices i public hearings on Highway Ikiparc*; ance  ^rtended  more  dram�   for from going haywire on th* presl-; go down.' Tugwell wasn't the first j ment practices about thr�e mtmUia jvonv^ntion   delegate* atill  angiT I dentlal year'-crystal cl^ar to aU la .i braintrysjnr by ..far-he  just  did j ago. ..................luveililLe "t;daaUir.dbL. ttkKL\..oi...a.; an^^n^:t ....Z-. ..^^ hinga-worse.   What   the    bratn [   The  invrstrgarfon- included   tbe--f-rrrmtka;rr.   wImk uufUitwl  a  Cam i [U M ^t,_ 1 , trust ut 1321 did was to Induce J cost of cement used on road con- : muui&t XiaK  on  the  stage  while1     CHALMERS WDOW Otfi Aftf^tbe^-tia-iu-shov�..uff -wan deflation. AVu I aUUcXliiU jubaand �tey said at loejuwi**u�>*king. :   Vll�i..A.t?0..(��rrMr�d^�.^ The words of Lewi*, pui*Wcut :  v materials or take other action to hinder Tokyo's undeclared war on China* Whot-hcr any steps actually will be  takeii apparently  depend*  on Japan. Tho treaty's termination- without   fanfare- places   commer :-*M- re larttmrtsaTw�w-rmr^two countries on � a day-to-day basis, although customs duties remain unchanged, Ainortcan abrogation of the 29 year old pact was believed in many cspltiil   qitattern   to    have    been \ piomphd  l�y  cotigrrxnionsl  agtfa 1 hoit tor riit nmtMigo on mateitsiM uhich J�p;ui  uc�mU for her njiil , tary t:smpn1gn^ r MilN pfioltnK o� the �cuatruoobt: �*Op   '^[Ml'tn    Ui     T� ift v��      (HI      (||p j present Pioneer Breeder of Officials here emphastie it wilt be up to Japan to lake the.necessary steps to bring about a new treaty. They believe world events have given tho United States the most strategic moment in docades to settle outstanding ttoubtea with the land of the rising sun. These events are:_________^....................... ITThi"""KTiicTTai'paueisiTwar which, after two aud a half years, has left Japan in occupation ot an Im j portent section of China but also hai dmined her resources. h tilth Bplit tho tlei man Japanese fta.ltan s^nti romlulet n policy, 3._Th�* European wai. which hs* I nit�.n I red   J n pa n �  ma rk r I n  in   1!u rnpe and made hrr more o^pen dent nn the t'ultcd SUir* (or e* �^t**l �upt*H^� i. JapaU 3i  UuUtlmi. hi  tl'.r  hat 4 Jersey Cattle Dies j I jtn conformity with Chile's no.utial-; tty policy. Th"P"go"\>rnor gave motion plriure .rxblbltors -4 hours to cut tbe Him. liich is based ou the story of the tngtlsh nut mo executed by the Germans in Belgium In tho World War PI ans to ments for cement in some cases were 25 to 65 cents*a barrel higher than prices paid by highway offi-clais In a number of Wisconsin rounds nod neighboring states. of  the miners anil  tbtr Congress. J. Chalmers, fprmcr chairman of c of  Industrial Organisations, were . tho AUta-Chalmets Company of mlK.l! watchetl closely (or-anv hint that i waukee. died yesterday. She 'wai; he would support Whcclcr for the ! the �Mt surviving daughter of AV presidency. ; Ian Pinkerton. chief ot tha-IL..JL_ The Mont a nan was a.hanced aa Secret Service during tha CWl-4 '{Contiuuvd *-n r,�L;f n\ (\d. 7}    ; Wsr. * -4- ^--^ I1KUHT,   Wis.,   (.-in-llonwr  C. . Taylor. i*ti. form*1!1 1,'iiivorsity of Wisconsin  re^i-m   ami  a  pioneer breeder t>f Jeisey cattle died yes. 1 terday. Kuucrnl  �'M vKts 'w 111  he held to mo t to w m I. Urli-u d v iU*i, Tnylor was credited with being ! the first to bring Jersey cattle In ! to Wisconsin.  He gamed national Keep Post Good Attendance At -  -   - ' * + The Weather FRIDAY." JANUARY Suiii'Iho. 7 US, Suiihct. 4.57. Moon rises at 7 .H t>. m- Manitowoc     Unsettled   totiUht * Parley Is Expected Dies WiU Not Step Out As Chair *4 mn of Probtrt KA CliOSSK, Win. (4��-nr V \. Uull.lckii.oii..- ..chairmau  of- It**- * publican Stat** Ccuw�U Conuulltw*', I -- j said   today   that   2 2s7  delegate i OUAKUK. IVias, �.4n-Kep. Dies j would be rligible for particMMtion ; tlVTexr Inferred Uulay he hns no I In the mid winter Mate Kepublicao Landis Has Plan Baseball's "Farm System si. + ^ *� m-4t f  p -- r- recognition at the Chicago fair in ; rontluucd cold, with slightlv cok'lVr f luuntlun of resigning as chairman'convention to be held hete Kcb 1S?5, and for luanv years was ttt rector and aeetetary of the Aiurr ; lean Jeisey Cattlo A�*ot Inllon. f Boys on Sled Killed In Crash With Car ttbt* inn* *m Immo t*-i|H!�rtliia (h^it-iakt. ntnd^rfd i**,1*'** *** hr� it Urir.oiul h.u-ttMi'i ot Chios Th#rs tarka on Uiitlth. i'fvnc^ and Am W*� Siuon Mlk  in iliv > VH   �frtcst/ lutai s#t� In CM�a Stsr. of >\  * ompiwmaaS ^tt  tH*�* ' t*ttt * fcy lk� tn�o|i4 ot CuUi�g Hit % '�|� lit r 1 4j    \     1       m     +. 1^�**k* ^ h,-4 -* v- J t \ *     *>'J - �*j.4tt    S4� c#m|. Ml t,!V   Uiv   � )* 1 b*iy�   ^i'?e   tn)\Ue�t   ftdrtV Im HonitMi ;M    .New   > tM K   * ' "I. Mlrtinl ti.!, \� � y � t *i 1 ns  t h V4 m iiiu C i   t �f   tho  h�ui�* * �"nimbus  on   uu-llS-i* niH'aco *,v> - k*:iu*.aw Moun i only tve present servlcf, and MA (tiia Ijantlii*. �-i�nnnb�lv�tier ot base * for any flutlrtpatwfr lrssdsr b.U'. offered n prov�^�i todsy to j Pro posts aufcsldtal      .4 major a  It      ft    IX K4    1.    . 4-      li*�U#-4�*     �f�# 4a       * H%s�*f    X I 4 ' > t * *  \ % t i i *      1 AUtiMicao Mtlivitie*. *% ftii�;Mcftted in Washington hy Secietary IcKes, " This oppoMttion ftvuu h kes is no %ww  thing. ' l�!r� hhuI     * Msnv of liked'   friends   ll.Or   lurll   r t pMMtnt mi   hint �itp out. tin lv k#4 toid t ry>M In * t'tv* h*il frtU-rxt tv>  |Ho  a< t u�'il  pwiSwtii  \h** * mi** ttuu)l��   th9?11   *xca�i?im,   �tut p\ 1l*d ^ *    " v-..jioi*i   *        |  tht* 111 the pat tj a bistos > Odd Fellows Hill At To protect tho minor team*oltttaf which huvo b sjrw* orgtiWasUoas\ propt^ed th�l all clubs of B� 0 i> ci�4�ificsttoii t>tt nivsn at Mibptdira  lie �MggssiadasSttlOttJtti| : St.ooo fo, cia�� U; ll.^tof ClMf t\ snd ilLsm for C4a�* It Ht* m�14 * *�LUuivUk� lUML Cashtoa Is Burned 1 kt^U iontrsct ssUms s1 1 Y^* r4 *l ?M4.. *. \vu. t4n    t n� iHUt -^�*\�      *h# u>i4# ^ * * � * * ^ ^ 1 * tsi  * V-^ tuts   >* ^s t'alluwxutt. UU d**Ulaa uf Jan tt wrtcn he itet Uued Ht piftyiTs ton !: oiled  i*V   t he   I   11 oM   I Ijlt'ii  (nil :tKelitn.   I.aodll*.   thli�U�h   ht�  StMO ! -*: ^  I .mite H\'onnoi  p� "p� �** d Hw t M.ijitr 4itd  ininoj   le.ik'ue* tiH'per �rc tn thr'- j,t)UE*u�^M �i^***b ni\jttt  iit> '*! '*( pl-*y% . * t�y otu UtlitS im!   in  tMi  ii �ft.ft.i4m��o
                            

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