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Manitouwoc County Herald Newspaper Archive: November 30, 1850 - Page 1

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Publication: Manitouwoc County Herald

Location: Manitowoc, Wisconsin

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   Manitouwoc County Herald (Newspaper) - November 30, 1850, Manitowoc, Wisconsin                               JCT 2 1 MANITOUWOC NTY HERALD, VOL. L] MANITOUWOC, EMBER 30, 1850. [NO. I. PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY MOKNING BY CHARLES W. WTCH, AT ONE DOLLAR AKI) FIFTY CENTS IN ADVANCE TIMS IF TIE ilSHI, The Commtj Herald b fVMLHHEO BlTUaUAI HOIUISU AT Tfco jrMriy of It ud fifty IB If not IH IwotMbn will ehurftd. AifYOTTfMHurn tmUlptagoiM or for I. The MM) will imtde la qmrterly, Iwlf- BUSINESS CARDS. A. Dici-em' "Jlwsthold Wurdi." The Power of Mercy, or the -Story of the Burglar's Son- Quiet enough, in general, is the Quaint old town of Lamborough. Why all this buntle to-day? Along tliti hedge-bound roads which load to it, carts, chaises, vehi- cles of every description arc jogging along filled with countrymen and here and there the wark't cloak or straw bonnet of Home oecup) ing a fhair, pluccd somewhat unsteadily behind them, contrasts gaily with the dark couts or smock frocks of the Iron t row; from every cottage of the su-1 some indiri duals join the rolls on inereuing through the street "ics the cutle. The ancient moat cfiil ri ing agitation. The voice of the partake of the surround- multitude which sur- CHYdlCIAN SURGEON, Street, KANHOITWOC.WIS, E. H. ELLIS, nnd at iii- AND General Land Agent. M anitonwoc Rapids, MANITOUWOC C... J. H. W. COLBY, i 01 AT LilW, AM) General land Agent, Of I l< t: YOICH .MTHEET, MAMTOUWOC, Wlri. QEO. REED. ATTORNEY AT LAW, AHD Solicitor in Chancery, MAWITOUWOO. JAMES L. KYLE, NEY AT LAW, jtlnnllotiwor, I, RUKER, nnd t'onnwllor at Law, COUNTY JUDGE AMI L.llVD fESSlOSI v Knnitouwoo, JONEfi Wholesale Retail MUI.KR IX HEAVY HARDWARE, Iron, Olow, Painti, Oib, Boota, Tin, Iron, and Copper Ware. A far itrpt Mtrtkant't Etrkattgc, MnnHonwor, HILL  vt'l In- hi-iird us ho pn tended to sleep on his 1'jivlv bed, their expeditions nt imrht, mask-1 1.1-1. O ul and armed, their busty returns, the I iiew.s of his but not rough grasp t him. At last the moa the house, and tlJthcr, by a different path, was Oeorge led, till they entered a small, furnished room. The walls were 1 with books, as the bright flame of the lire revealed to tlie anxious gaze of the. little culprit. The clergyman lit n lamp, and surveyed his prisoner attentively. The lad's eyes wore fixed on the ground, while Mr. Lcyton's wandered from bis pinched features to his scnnty, ragged at- tire, through the tatturs of which he could discern thu thin limbs quivering from culd or fear; and when at lust impelled by curi- osity at the long silence, George looked tip, thore something so sadly compassion- ate in i he stranger's gentle look, that this boy could scarcely believe that lie was re- alty the man -whoso evidence bad mainly contributed to transpoi L hU fiiiher. At the trial he hat! been unable, to see his face, and nothing so kind lutd ever gazed upon liim. His jx'otiil, bad feelings were already inciting. Von lu'ik said Mr. Lcy- lun; draw nearer tho lire, you can sit down oji that stool while I question to which hitherto he bad been a 'At lost the clergyman asked, Whnt havo induced you to commit such a the house of female in the town, mind you answer me1 the truth. 1 am nut n magistrate, but of course I can easily hiirid you over to justice, if you will not al- low me. to benefit you in my way." George stood .still twisting his ragged cap in bis trembling lingers, and with BO owii'remo-' mur'n emotion depictudin his face, that the clergyman resumed, in stil more Manllonwoc, J'ROMlTf.Y ATTEND TO EVJJKY IK.-ILW.W AMD M'INUOW WINDOW SASH, KACTUKKD ANP ON HAND. M  jfrontMDfl Father of tho fatherless, the child knew nothing, lie deemed himself alone in the world. Yet grief won not JMM pervading feeling, nor the shamo of being known as the son of a transport. It was revenge which burned within him. He thought of thu crowd which Imdcome, t'> feast upon his father's agrmy; lie longed to tear in pieces nnd lie plucked savagely at the, grass on which he leant. Oh, tlmt he wns a man! that he. could punish them lirst, the constables, the judge, tlie jury, the of them espe- cially, a clergyman named Lcyirjn, who had given Inn evidence more positively, more clearly, than all the others. Oh, tlmt In- ciiukl do that man some for him his father would not have been identi- fied nnd convicted. soothing accents: "I have no wish to do you any thing but good, my poor boy; look ut me, and scu if you can need not bo.thug ''_ to hear the fciCTof misery your appearance indicates, to relieve it, if I can. Here the young culprit's heart smote him. this llio whose house ho had tried to bum On whom hu had wish- ed to bring ruin and perhaps death "Was it a smut1 spread for him to lend to a con- fession? But lie looked on that Krave, compassionate countenance, hu felt tlmt it was not. Come, my lad, tell me George had fur years heard little but and curses and ribald justs, or tin thief's jargon of his father's associates, find hud been constantly cuffed nnd punished; but the liettcr part of his nature was not extinguished; nnd at those words from the mouth of his enemy, hu dropped on hit; nnd clasping his hands, tried t> speak; .Suddenly a thiTu-lit occurred to him, Ids i but could only sob. lie had not wept be- eyos sparkled rtkh tierce delight. I know during that day of anguish; nnd now liu lives." hi1 wild in himself. bp hero liw he said to himself, has ihu farm nnd parsonage of Milwood. I ill go there at is almost dark al- ready. I will do I have heard my father say he once did to the squire. I will set his barns and his house on fire. Yes, yes, In1 shall bum for shall get no more To pnx'iire a of matches was an easy task, and that all the preparation the made. The autumn was far advanced. A cold wind wns beginning Ujtnnan among the al- mosl leulli'.ss trees, and Ciuurgu West's teeth dmUercd, tuul hist Ul-clnd litubs grew numb of. hfi wulked along llio fields loading lo Millwood. it's a drtrk niglit; this! fine wind will fan the flame he re-' peatad to himself. The clock was sinking nine, but all was quiet midnight; not apul stirring, not a light in the parsonage windows that he could see. He dared not open the gate, lost the click of the latch should betray him, so he softly climbed over; but scarce- ly had he dropped on the other side of the wall before the loud barking of a dog star- tled him. He cowered down behind the hay-rick, scarci-ly daring to breathe, expec- ting each instant that the would spring upon him. It was some timfe before the boy dared to stir, and as his courage cooled hm thirst for revenge somewhat subsided al- AO, till ho almost determined to return to Lnmborough; too cold, too roman would beat him for staying out so but he was too tired, the his tears guslicd forth so freely, his grio) was eo passionate as be. half knelt, half rest- ed on thu floor, that the good questioner saw that sorrow must have its course ere calm could be restored. The ynung penitent still vrept, when a knock was heard ut tho door, and a lady entered. It was the clergj-manV wife, he kissed her as she, nskcd how he had suc- ceeded with the wicked man at the jail? 'He told replied Mr. Leyton, "that lie had a son whose fkto tormented him more tluui his punishment. Indeed, his mind wasso distracted respecting tho youth, tbat hu was scarcely able to understand my exhortations. Hu entreated me with ago- nizing enorgy to save his son from such n life as he had led, and gave me the address of a woman at whose house he lodged. I was, however, unable io find the boy, in spite of my earnest inquiries." could he do? where should and as the sense of his lonely nnd late. lie ff forlorn jKjwiiim returned, BO did also the HI- fccliunale remembrance of his father, his haired of liin accusers, his desire to satisfy his vengeance; and once more, courageous through anger, he rose, took the box from his pocket, and boldly drew one of them "Didyou hear his asked the wife. George was the reply. At tlie mention of his name the boy ceased to sob. Breathlessly he heard thu account of lib) father's last request, of the benevolent clergyman's wish to fulfil it. He started up, ran towards the door, and endeavored to open it; Mr. Ley ton calmly restrained, 1 ou must not he sakL I can not stop here, I can not bear to look at you. Let me The lad said this wildly, and shook himself away, Why, I intend you nothing but kind- neM." A new flood of tears gushed forth; and George West said, between his sobs, While you were searching for me to help mo, 1 WBJS trying lo burn you in your house. I can not bear it." He sunk nn his knees, and covered his face with both hinds. the.saml-parwr. Il flamed; he xtuck There was a long silrncr, for Mr. n it hastily in the k against wiiirh he ic.st-' Mrs. were its much moved a.s ihc yiily Ihtkcred a little, and went out. j who buivcd dovn with slianic anti siiddenly in the excitement of re- Mitttde, and many feelings new to hooesitated for a moment, and then ..._ Jua Story; he related ,hig trials, bis ifflB, his sorrows, his supposed wrongs, his JOrning onger at the terrible fate of parent, and liis rage at the exultation crowd: liis desolation on recovering his swoon, liis thirst for vengeance, attempt to satisfy it He spoke with child-like simplicity, without at- the emotfoni wliioh e ceased the lady hasMhed to the crouching boy, and soothed him with gen- tle words. The very tones of her voice were knew to him. They pierced his itart more acutely thnn the fiercest of the upbraidinga nnd denunciations of hib old companions. I To luukcd on hi.s merciful with bewildered tenderness. [It1 kissed Mrf. Leyton'h hand, then gi-ntly aid on his shoulder. He ir.ined about like, one in u dmim vi ho dreaded He Became faint and staggt-i-ed. He >MIS hiid cntiy on a sof.t, and Mr. and Lej t-on ft htm. Frtid was shortly administered (n him, did after a time, when his senses had be- come aufBciently collected, Mr. I.eytim re- ,urned to the study, wild explained holy md beautiful Uiings, whkh were new to ;lie neglected buy uf the utreat yet loving iither; of Him who loM'd the pour, forlorn wretch, equally with the richest, and no- cst, and Imppiost; of the force, andellk-u- o-rrrt me the Vterciful, for they shall obtain Men y." I heard this story from Mr. F.eyton, dil- ilnga visit to him in May. AVest was then head ploughman to a m iubboring farmer, one uf the cleiiiiest, be-t bclwril, and aiijfsl in Ihcjiari.'-lL MIND. A I.AIlOIt CKAUNT. Atngonon tliocliiuiy anvil of the soil M oC uetvo auiJ sweated brows aen of truth and toil of prinievnl forests nan of the city liut-e labor chnunt "BATTLE WITH LIFE." Bear up bravely, fitrony heart and true. Meet thy gravely, Strive wid tliem tou! Let lliom not win from thoo Tear of regret, Such wero a >iii from thco, Hope for food yoi! Houso thoe -from drooping. Care-laden mut; itooniag control! Far (loon that UM Shrowllitg itronftr, Rnolule mind! Let DO longer Heavily bind. Roe an thy eagle Gloriously frco! Till from material Ihingn 1'uro tliou slirill Bear up bravely, Soul ami minJ lou'. Droop nci BO gravely, ISM lioart and true! Clear rnyji of jilrcamiuf; Whine through gloom, GoJ's lovo fa beaming bright K'eii rouin] ilia tomb.' JENNY LIND. IIV FliEDlllKA 1 was delightful. In the night wene where AviHha, teeing her lover come, oui hor joy in rapturous song, our young sin ;er on turning from the window at lite bai k of the theatre, to tlie a, pule fur joy. And iu that pale ncM she snug with n burst uf outflowing lov nnd life tlmt called forth, not the mirth, Inn the tt'ars uf tin.' thiotimc WM fft- vonle of i he .Swedish public, whoiciniuic- nl i isles know ledge are Mid not to be surpassed. And, year after yew, the ww- tinned so, thougli, after H lime, bdng wentrained, lout of tte frwhness, and tbe puMie being moitj crovdad and playing more dellghtftj- ly than eferln Paminn (in ZRuberflote) or in Anna Uolenii, though the opera wiw al- destrU'd. She unng for pit; iwv of the song. 1 y thai tiim: slu- went lake iu 1'aris mid st> give the linisliijig h to her musical oducntkin. There she ncii'-.iri'il lliul narble iu which 4ie in said InH' been equalled by no Mngcr, mid wliich oui M In- funtpitivd niily lo thill of ihf si.iiniiy and garbling lurk, if ihc lard had u And (lien Ilio young girl went nnroiul iitid mi foreign shores and to foreign pmm in Si. iln If for my kind it to wenllb if It part you, WUb to f ai 'tis From that god-found jialaco, (from learning's cryalal cholico, miglity stoup or MIND ".of brawny bone and sinew, and homely brows oie suu-dyeil, i- Toiling on life's raft, the wild sea of existence 1 Truthful mote than witty UoTre'i achauntof swoel rosidtanco thorus now my Oitly! Brotlien, if you mean to lift your Trusty heads among your kind, j Aid giant Thouglit, to shift your upon llio way of kiiuwlcdjjo, I (Learning's way is freo of tollnjjo Autd with shiHjls an hundrod hundred, tlio Ago's sp-rii thundered Whoso ruletli iiouglit but whose onty mace and aabro Are tbe Scythe and whom corded sinews labor til the wheel or wedge- Men who lovo the earned prize, the rich man's pity Ilejic's a chavnt come clioruu rise, jtnd swell aloud my ditty! Brothers, conh would be a dismal Darren, wrotched place, designed, if it had uot nature's prismat Suulight, uright'iiing, as il dalliua, O'er aide-hill and But' more datluomo, eoulltu, canon, .the heart vale lies barren, 4Jnliili> tbe San of HIHD! t CUSTOM. A Spanish peasant, Then) he eats a good apple, peach, or any other! fruit, in a forest or by the road Bides, the seed and hence it is that the woodlands and road sides of Bpain have fruit in and along them, than those of any spther country. ReV. Dr, answer to up- and C. of Boston, said, rcconlly, in rather a pert young ftclleman him, "Pray, Dr. what m tin between tho pusyism they talk so mVich about and puppyism P pyisi >t sir, is founded on d pusy fun on the catechism." Oj inions may be considered as the of knowlcdgf. If our knowledge be accu ate, our opinions will be just It very important ihon that we do not adopt opini His too hastily. Irishman, writing a sketch of his life .e early ran away from his father, be he discovcrrd he was only his uncle re mural ballast, nnd ti fjoru tapiang ui lie sea oi ;uik. There was i ni'< nirl dwelliiig in (i tlie eajiitiil i.if Sneden. it pm.r lilllc girl indi ed, tLen: --lie ly am! neglected, nnd I- -i n u-r, un- hiijijH', dcjiriied uf .in 1 su in ces-ary to ;i chi'd, if .i ini'i li.j-n jir-rul'ar 'll.c j'iil !i.i-l a line UIKV, and i i Iu-r 1'iu i s ti- iiil-1' n the liltie who tu enliven bcr bin il a cat The little {iirl playt'vl in r 'it and OIH-I- sin- bv the "jen win- dow nnd stroked Jier cut aiul snnfr, wlam n lnOy passed Dy. Klu- heard (lu> vciee mid lixjked uj) and saw tlie liltie r. Sin- asktil thu child several (jucstiuns, nciit away, and came buck sever..1 al'U'r, fnl- loweil by an old music nuu-U'r, was Ife tried the lillle- Bill's i-iu- Kcal i'iir nnd mid was jiv.i lit; Iier tu.thu diredur the Open of iSU'i-khn'm, then a (.'mi it I'uhe, wlK'j-i1 truly gi'iiirou-i and In in (.'Hlct'uk'd by rmigh sjieii-1. :i innrbid uinper. dilius introduced liis Iitil> jiuj'tl to tin1 count, and asked liim tu i n r fill1 the tlJK'i.l" VoVl !U-k .1 >--h tl said the t lu..liiii lisdnmfully down on t'.ir 'lit.le fii I. Wli it sliidl we do v.ll'i ll.'it 111 what feel she lias! Ami I In n jh-r -I ho ivill never be pi'e.-en.irtle. innci fc.kc her. h. Th'! musif lantly. e.vlaimi d !ie ru I.M, "if nn'.. Uikc her, p.mr -.is I am, I ake 1-er myself, and have her edn "itcil hu scene; such another ear ilio li.w f'.'f music isiii'tlo be found in the Th'1 cuiint relented. The little jjirl was it last admitted into ilicauhoul f, ir (U i .he Opera, nnd with w.me dilliciiliy a >le yf black bumbiwiiu' was jinn ,1 In r. The care uf hrrmiisii a) ciiura'ioii vas t'j an able miuili r, Mr. AVieri Jri'g, djreck'r of the sony scho-.J uf ;he Opera. iSonie years later, at a -ily by tlie- cli'i'cn di tin: thi-iilre, several ptrs'Mis were struck by the spirit ml hlV with wliich a very young iv :ieU-d tlic part i in the piny. genial nature were charmed, pedants almost friglit- l It wns our poor littilc cirl.-A bu hiu! made her first appearance, now about four- teen jears of age, fixJiclceomc and full of Tun as a child. A few years slilllater, a youngdcbutanto was to sing for first time before the pub- lic in Weber's Frtischutz. At the rehear- sal preceding the representation of tlie eve- ning, die sang in a niiinncr that made the members of the Orchestra at once lay down their int-truments to clap their humK in raptuioiM applause. It wits our pi" >r, Bute yirl Iwrc wl-n jmw had up and was to appear hi fore Ihe publie in QIC role of Agatha. I saw hor at the eve- ning representation. iShe W.'LS then in the prime of youth, fresh, and heroin1 as a mor ring in in hands and her arms peculiarly and lovely in her whole rippennim thrmsah the of her and Ihe noble simplicity ami calinncv, of Iier nmn ncre. In fiwthhc >Vi not an acUc-HS but n joung ptl uf n i tural geniality mid grai o. She weni.'il move, speak, and sing uith'xit Hurt m' :Mt. All- w.is iisiUiTO and Lirriioiiy Her was d fhj'fti.illy jnu'i' and tl f pfnvrr wnd whi1 h im 'I in h'.r tvni. H'-JT ,ui le, Sin? cliamu'd ehai-ned slie cli.irmed Engliuid. caivsM'il and murted vverj I'M'i Miliihitinn. At the courts of kingx, .U t ie hiniM-s iif the it iiiid noble, H.-I-- leai-t.'d IH ctio of die craudees of tvn- lure and art- She was covered llUl- ji N i ui jciii-U. liul f.ieiids vvji'ti- of her, In the Dji-Kt then1 splendors she only ihii'l of her Sweden, aiid yeanis fur her t'rii iuls and her pi njile.1' C die-Kv Ueiubir crowds of "I (tin nt'i-r pai', by thur ilrehs, KCI m- t d I- 1'Or; V> e UJipcr i I' sKcielj) "..I mi On the llaltie liarlmr Id .'.n. Ud Lmaids the s-e.-L "ii> w i-.l ir i lanee nd [ilea- lii-ii -s jiii-i-i d invay, and lln-ii'ivv Js> -lill i, d. M.iiled" a.K! J...ikid cut e.l V t-m ird .1. Atlell'iril ;l bril- li.iii! u'n-kei t-usv fur out' M the cn- e uf the and yiceU'tl wiUl p icialb.iZK nn llie -.hcire. I'liere she mines! iher.1 she A sit-n.ier i-.iine on ila Irinn.phaiil way llirouidi the iuul lunik, lying !n tl.e Jiailior, 1 of 11 ic ruck, ts niarlied its nay iu the dark as il iidv.i leeii. Tlie cruwil- on llie slioropreofi- i ;1 d' w.ird a.i if Iu inei I iu the leii- attinii of the wiiU-iN ber.rd lliisnderirg ncaii r icleiiti agiiiti on, iuaiiiiiij; and Jlow it And ili. i e, Jiu front uf UK'. by tin- of lumps anil p.de, Iier ;aiit wiih t.'irs, jnid lijis railianl es, b'T l.'imlki rcllief lo r.ds and ci-uiiln men uji -b" j.l.iiii, nc'g- I lillle u) f .inii-r now C.IIIH bin 111 triiii'ijih to ln-r fitlieiland. IJul i.-i iiiur.- uu 'iinri plain, im nvovn -led. >k''ie liad beniiiu1 j-irli, slie had h1, hi i- jieiMiii clliUtU nrd i he iiiiiltilndcs. t SM r.e later, ne read in tbe jvipcrH I of Si K-kholrn, jut address Ibc public, ji by the bflnvid singer, suuinsj, willi that once nunt; j had the liajijiinei-.s be ill Iier nativelimd, s-hc viukl be King ngnin )MT 1'iuiii unicii, and thai the inconit: uf the Oper.is in hlie wius this t-crtKHi U) Hj) i I'c.ir, a n be Tin1 i ed, idi) be devou-d ID rai--e a fund Inr .c'l where for tlie llx-atfc would '.n all d lo UltUi1 and ktiowlellgc." iti IHueniv was n i as it dcs-er- i-.d of the Upera WBH crowded <-im nielli the bel'rtrd singer Kiing tlieR1. t isi vinii ajij-c.ireil in ijumnnmbu- (oi n1 of In r the pubbe, iiftei I'ti'-t.iii) w.is dioppeil, culled IHT back irith gnat <-alliu-.Ja.Mn, nnd remvtd her, rtheu she appeared, with n roar of huri-.iiiK. In the uudst uf the buiitt of n I'.t.i oml n At Mlllg WBH heard hurrahs wore hushed instant- ly. And we saw the lovely ginger Uaad- ing with her anna slightly extended, wmo- wluit bowing forvard, graceful Union it.-; branch warbling M no bint ever ilid, from note to note and on every one n clear, strong, soaring warble until she fi It iutx) die retoumellc of lu-r lust King, and a jjnin wing tliut joyfid and touching No )n Ui. HD how 1 fwlklmy 'I'll; lurJ.UTIXKKT is joii'-ngc inquired a gallant cen- sus n Jitslial of ft young lady, about V satdd'e fair out, dnoving up anil exhibiting a (on Je Jriit of broken ti i iii. i-- a queMJon, but it be hat hliall 1 place y u.i! Twi-nly, I dc uld think." I Tnl the old [ril, nvJ- lilied, I tlunk I iwfniy Lu-t .-ml i- I'MJIIK. I ihMt. d our friend in i i1. .1 of viui .iiid ijll sixain Ix J. li t .111-   

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