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La Crosse Tribune Newspaper Archive: August 2, 1906 - Page 1

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Publication: La Crosse Tribune

Location: La Crosse, Wisconsin

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   La Crosse Tribune, The (Newspaper) - August 2, 1906, La Crosse, Wisconsin                               t THE TRIBUNE IS THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE GlTYAWD OF THE COUNTY OF LA CROSSE Official Newspaper of La Crosse County The Tribune has the largest circulation'ofrany daily newspaper in Western Wisconsin Paper Not Owned by a T VOLUME III NUMBER 58 LA CROSSE, WISCONSIN. THURSDAY, AUGUST 2. 1906 PRICE TWO CENTS EAT ffi St, Petersburg Quiet Today is REPORTS ARE CONFLICTING Cruiser Siezed, Commander Killed and Czar's Yacht Ready to Sail (Seripps-McRac Dispatch.) ST. PETERSBURG, Aug. It is officially announced that the mutiny at Kronstadt is ended. Seize Cruiser ST. PETERSBURG. Aug. crew ol' the cruiser Pamjots mutinied loday and killed the commander and four officers. The battleship Slava was ordered to find and sink the mu- tineer. Late arrivals from Kronstadt say the disorder there has been quelled for the time being. The spirit of the men at the garrison, however, is dan- gerous and further outbreaks arc Hke- y ST. P ET E RS B U R G, A ug. c latest from Helsingt'ors says the two islands arc ablaze. Three thousand mutineers are said to be on the point of surrendering, as they arc practic- ally without ammunition or food. Admiral Is Wounded The mutiny at Kronstadt continues with serious lighting and the casual- ties are known to be a- hundred. Admiral BcklemizcfF is among the1 wounded. The imperial yacht Polar Star, with steam up. is lying at the pier below Peteriiof palace. The Ringleaders of the rebellious companies of the Samur regiment, at Deshlager, commanding the gate at Derben. have been handed over to ihe Cossack commanders. Qain Sveaborg Fortress Aug. Hei- singfors dispatch says the trained control of the whole Sveaborg fortress, except the Island of Saiid- ham. Harakka. explosion of a magazine at Ugushclman island killed' forty mu- tineers. Loyal troops lost heavily in the tightiiiK- Fort Constantino Saved The mutineers seized Fort Constan- tino, but were dislodged and com- pelled to surrender, besides having a hundred killed and many wounded Some mutineers escaped to I inland bv steamer. Loyal Troops Arrive ST PETERSBURG. Aug. 2.-, Troops sent during the night to-sur- round the Kronstadt garrison, arrived this morning. Subsequent develop- ments are a mystery. One report says four mutinous war- ships from Helsingfors arrived at the Kornstadt garrison with guns trained, but that HO shots were lircd. Capital Is Quiet WASHINGTON, D. C., Aug. Ambassador M'cycr of St. Petersburg, cables the state department that the revolt of soldiers in that city has been ELK COMMITTEES FRIDAY Meeting Tonight Will Hear Informal Story of Work; go in The Tina! meeting of convention committees of the Elks be held tomorrow, at which all reports must be made to the executive committee. At the meeting this evening official reports of the convention committees will not he made, but statements will be received of the progress of the work by the lodge and the affairs will be reviewed. At tonight's meeting the new club- house matter will come up, the com- mittee on furnishings, etc., probably making a report. Tt is expected there will be a large number of candidates for initiation and as this is the last lodge meeting before the biff convention next week, a big attendance of members of the order is expected. Reception Committee Felber Out ot Town II-M-M AND CHICKEN, TOO ONE CHASED IN AN AUTO By Constable Omerberg as he Sought to Evade Service of Papers If the Central suit, in which mi- nority stockholders of that company seek to recover damages for the im- proper leasing of the plant by. its di- rectors to the light trust as the result of an alleged conspiracy to eliminate lighting and power competition through a transaction in which the de- fendant directors would personally profit, is tried at the September term HUNDREDSATTEND BOARD'SBARBEQUE Unique Picnic Attracts Large Crowds; Esch Talks on River of the circuit court, Charles The executive committee of who. is also manager has appointed the following reception- committee to have charge of the re- ception and .general entertainment of the visiting brothers: F. 1-1, Hankerson, F. R. H'artwcll, E. A. Gattcrdam, G. Gordon, C. S. Van Aukcn, O. Sorensen, Wu A. Wiggcnhorn, J. W. Skinner, R. T. Case J. A. Elliott, William Torranc.-, T. W. Tarbox, M. F. Platz, F VV. H'osly, A. E. Forschlcr, D. It. Palmer, M. F. Hayes, T. J. Parian, J. iS Hougan, A. F. Rcitzcl, J. E. Kir- ichies, William I-ltellfach, F. M.. Wil- cox, J. D. dc Ranitz, S. J. La Chap- ellc! VV.. H. Funke, J. P. Salzer, W. Meyers, W. B. Sprawl, J. M1. Sie- ger C F White, !D'. S. Fairbairn; J. P. 'Luxem. C. Ml O'Connr. C. W. Hunt, E. C. Raymond. W. Hosly, S. R. Conger, P. Lutz. R. E- Bigham, D J Williams. Fred Hartwcll, J. L. Linker. H. C. Evenson, W. V. Kid- cler, 1-r. H.art. C. A. Worth, S. H. Palmer. T. Thompson, E. C. Bartl, Lester Kecnc, E. S. Dittman, H. H. Nicbuhr, G. E. Taylor, Olat Elton. The executive commitcc which has had charge of the coiu'cn'tion arrange- ments is: F. H. Hankerson, president; W. A. Wiggcnhorn, secretary; F. P. Hixon, F. A. Cope-land, George H. Gordon, F' R Hartwcil, Henry Guild, C. S. Van Aukcn. E. A. Gattcrclam, John C Burns, J. VV. Skinner, E. L. Col- man, O. J. Sorcnscrl, H. M. Bochm, Robert Calvcrt. Felber, of the cannot di E'." company -store, be made a party defendant. Constable Louis Omerberg has been unable to get service on Mr. Felber. The latter has been out of the city, having gone July 26 after the drafting of the complaint, and it is announced at the store that his stay be Constable Obcrbcrg served the pa- pers on three defendants July 22 without difficulty, but not only was he unable to get service on Mr. Felber at ali, but he failed to serve on J. E. Willing until July 28, several days after the service was' first attempted. H'e finally served the papers on Mr. Willing by "spotting" that gentleman in front of the Savage blacksmith shop, on North Third street. Omer- berg pressed City Attorney Mahoncy's a-itomobile into service, and pounced down upon .Mir. Willing before he could again disappear. He says Mr. Willing told him he had been avoid- ing Main street for days to escape ser- vice. and that lie had not even dared FINDS GRAFT IN SLAND ARMY to go to Forschler's cigar store where he buys his cigars for fear of being seen by the cQnstable. Today was the last day during which the .service could be made in time to get the' case before the court at the September term. Attorney W. F Wolfe counsel for the plaintiffs said today, that if Mr. Felber returned he could be made a witness in the case, but could .not be made a party plaintiff. No intimation as to the in- tentions of the plaintiffs regarding this new complication was given out. _ f suppressed and that the city ts now CScrinps-wicRae Dispatch.) MANILA. Aug. Gen- eral Wood, investigating the accounts of the army construction department, has discovered graft extending over a period of four years. Four quarter- master and two clerks have been or- dered here from the United' States to RACINE MOB IS AFTER ASSAULTER (Special Tribune Dispatch.) He declares ihe report of a mutiny aboard the Russian warships is denied. Showers tonight and probably Friday; cooler. I Warmest, 82; coolest, 70; wind, 8 miles. The river will continue to fall steadily. Stacre of water 4-3. a fall of SOO CANAL EXPERT ASSISTANT ON THE_PANAMA (Scripps-McRae Dispatch.) WASHINGTON, D. C., Aug. 'Joseph Ripley, former superintendent of'the Soo canal, was appointed; prin- cipal assistant engineer of the Pana- ma canal. RACINE, Wli's., Aug. armed mob of fifty chased Al- bert. Bowes, aged 28, in the streets this morning, after an al- leged assault on a 14-year-old girl. The police rescued him aft- er he was badly injured. The jail may be stormed. he Board and its guests did not do anything at all but put away thatox tod ay. TWO SUBPOENAS And Scores for Small Fry In prosecution of Oil Octopus JUGGLING BONES Erie County Auditor is Con- victed of Graft on Dead Bodies (Scripps-McRae Dispatch.) BUFFALO, N. Y., Aug. John W. NcfT, former auditor of Eric county, was convicted at Warsaw this morning of grand larceny for stealing from the public funds in connection with a contract for the removal of bodies from a cemetery here. Roland Conover. a contractor, lias already been convicted of grand larceny and awaits sen- tence. He testified that false warrants were issued by'Neff and thru the money was equally divided. Con- over piled up the human bones and called each pile a body. The first annual cygSfsion .and bar- ectie of 'the-rLa Crossc- Board of rade was held in Dresden park cross the river-from Dresbach today, s the weather was favorable several undrcd attended. The Fountain City and barge left he levee with the picnickers at and 10 and u, and t o'clck in the after- oon. Launches made trips to the ark at regular intervals during the av. Promptly at 12 the serving of the oast ox began and continued witii- ut intermission during the entire aft- rnoon. Besides the roast ox plenty f other delicacies were served. Pea- uts, bananas and lemonade were crved free, the only thing that was old on the grounds were cigars. During the afternoon Congressman ohn J. Esch delivered an address. Talks on Transportation Congressman Esch, in his address, -ook up the matter of river transpor- ation and improvement and rates ransportatioiv generally. Mr. Esch ointcd to what has been done for the improvement of the Mississippi and f the plans for the six-foot channel, hich he believes is sure to come vithin a short time. He pointed to he Panama canal as the connecting :nk to make the Mississippi one of he greatest arteries of commerce in loming generations. Mr. Esch also spoke of the numer- ous improvements in railroad trans- >ortation facilities in this scccion. A baseball game between the La Jrosse'and Frceport teams was play- ed on the picnic grounds. This being the first event ot the kind given by the board of trade as many as could attended. It was decided that the stores would not be closed for the afternoon, the merchants reaching this conclusion on acount of the refusal of-the jobbers and manufacturers to colse their es- tablishments. The barbecue was an unique affair and an entire success. It was attend- ed by nearly all of the business and professional men, in spite of the fact that the stores did not close. There re many ladies present. Supper will also be served this even- in- and the crowds will begin return- (Scrinns-McRae Dispatch.1) CHICAGO, Aug. sub- poenas for important witnesses in the Standard Oil company investigation were forwarded to New York today. A dozen others were .sent to Cleve- land and many were placed in the hands of local officers for service. District Attorney Sullivan of Cleve- land, has arrived to aid Assistant At- torney General PagiiT and Special Counsel Morrison. Sullivan brought a large bundle of documentary evi- dence for use in the grand jury room Monday. Soak Us Just the Same TOLEDO, O., Aug. Stan- dard Oil company announced another cut in the price of crude oil, 3 cents in the cast and i cents in the west, making a cut of 6 cents east and 4 cents west this week. Excessive re- ceipts are alleged to be the cause. LIENSTEIN HURT IN COLLISION OF E COMPANY OFFICIALS CAW IN CAVE-IN AND SMOTHERED (Scripps-McRae Dispatch.) DENVER. Colo., Aug. bod- ,cs of L. A. Thompson, secretary, Treasurer V. W. Mothers and Super- iHcndcnt Tempest of the Apex Min- ng company were discovered in a tun- icl in the Mickey Brecn mine this morning. They "attempted to leave the mine by this exit and were caught a cavein and smothered. ing at about dark. THIRTY DROWN ON FERRY BERLIN, Aug. ferry on Vis- eula river, near Wilnawo, sank and thirty were drowned. "JOE" A PAPA AGAIN City Clerk Joseph Sieger is the iroud father of an eight-pound girl- Andy Lienstcin, a rag picker and ron gatherer, was run into by Lafe local transfer man. on the corner of State and Seventh streets at K.OII today. They were driving down State street and Licnstien was a lit- tle in advance of Allendorf. When ;hcy came to Seventh .street Liensticn tried to turn, going ahead of Allen- dorf. The pole of Allendorf's wagon caught the wagon of Lcinsticn about amidships and b'oforc ihc horses could c backed up Licnsticn's wagon was overturned and the contents of old iorn and rags scattered over the street. The horse struggled to its feet and started to kick itself clear breaking the harness into bits, but had just started to run when he was stored by a Tribune reporter. What was left of the harness was and it >vas discovered that both hind legs of the horse wc-e cut badly. By this time a crowd had galh- ered-and helped the unfortunate He- brew to collect his scattered belong ings. The axle of the wagon was splintered ui two palccs and ihe bo> was damaged. Liensticn was thrown clear of thi box or he might have been badly hurt As it was his face was scratched. Allendorf was not hurt at all. Mr. Liensticn said he would bring suit against Allendorf. PROPERTY TRANSFER B. S. Rliland and wife today trans ferrcd property in the city lo Imo gene A. Houghlon for FOUR DEAD AND TWO WOUNDED IN FUEDISTS' BATTLE WITH SHERIFF HARTJE TESTIMONY ALL IN (Scripps-McRae PITTSBURG, Pa., Aug. All tes- timony riooiC in the Hartjc case was in at ORANGE W SHORT .LOS ANGELES, Cal., Aug. The orange crop in southern Califor- nia will be 20 or 30 per cent under the crop of the season just colsed. Climatic conditions this spring are the cause. (Scripps-Mc Dispatch.) LEXINGTON Ky., Aug. men are dead and two wound- ed as a result of a bloody battle last night between the sheriff's posse and the Martin faction of the feudists in Knott county. The Martins number fifty men and are entrenched on Beaver Creek They refuse to surrender. _ Unless the Martins, give up in twenty-four hours Governor Beck- ham will be appealed to to send troops. Marvelous Chapel Scene of Service FOUR BISHOPS OFFICIATE' Most Elaborate Ceremony at Opening of 000 Edifice More than three hundred of the sis- ters of the Franciscan society and be- tween eighty and ninety pricsis fr.om Wisconsin and Minnesota today took part in the elaborate consecration of the new half-million dollar chapel, the Mhria AiiRelorum. at which Rl. Rev Bishop James Schwcbach of this city officiated, assiled by Bishops Fox of Green Hay. Schinner of Superior and oitcr of Winon.i. Archbishop Mess- ier of Milwaukee found it impossi- le to attend, at the last moment. The ceremony of the consecration :artcd al 6 this morning. At liout pnntiiicial high mass, an laborate ceremony, was celebrated. At noon an elaborate banquet was crved t') the visiting clergy al the St. convent dining ,hall. which was specially decorated for the occasion. There were many visitors who wit- ?ssed the ceremony, as many invita- DIIS being'issued as there was room, fter the priests and sisters had been The ceremonies will conclude this veiling with the procession of the Icssed sacrament from the old chapel o the new chape! of perpetual ador.i- 011. Of Rare Magnificence The magnililiccnt interior of the uilding is not betrayed by tile plam rick exterior, although the magnili- cnt. lofty form and artistic stability f the structure appeals lo one at lirst lance and makes one eager to look vithin. As all chapels and convents arc. the dililicc is built in the form of a cross nd adjoins the convent proper on ihe mith. Miassive swinging doors of .lid bronze connect the buildings. new structure is as nearly firc- iroof as human skill can make it. The icws and a few of the wood carvings ind banister rails arc of mahogany quartered oak, but il would be- extremely difficult to burn even these ind there is no wood in the balance of lie structure. In the chapel nine huge pillars of stucco on either isde extend to the -.'.tar. Myriads of lights relleetinR siU er and gold and shining marble and jlcnding the varicolored decorations n one grand harmony of beautiful ef- 'ect. attracts the eye hither and ihith- er until one is utterly lost in the blaze of art. Colored window scenes on cither side arc most elaborate and portray a number of biblcal scenes. These win- dows came from MHjnich, where the most beautiful colored glass scenes'in he world arc made, and of which there arc two dozen samples in this chapel. The lofty columns with the arched ceilings descending to the .tained glass windows give one the general Romanesque idea. Above lhcv sanctuary a cupalo, also of colored glass, allows the light to penetrate from dozens of electric globes be- tween the colored windows and the outer windows. The ceiling is finished in cream color and gold. The frescoing is done in gold, gold leaf being used in the finishings. All the stations arc carv- ed out of wood and covered gold. They arc most elaborate and exquis- itely beautiful. Thirty massive chan- deliers of the most expensive sort fur- nish the light in the main auditorium. (Continued on page 6.)   

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