Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Kingston Tribune Newspaper Archive: February 14, 1946 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Kingston Tribune

Location: Kingston, Wisconsin

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Kingston Tribune, The (Newspaper) - February 14, 1946, Kingston, Wisconsin                               THE KINGSTON TRIBUNE "A Home Owned Newspaper Devofcrf to the Interest of the Home Folki." VOLUME 64 PUBLISHED WBBCLY KINGSTON, WISCONSIN, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, PRICE A YEAR NUMBER 17 IN THIS COLUMN By E. W. W. To my mind, the beat and most faultless character his who is as ready to pardon the rest of mankind, as though he daily transgressed himself, and at the same time as cautious to avoid a fault as if he never for- gave Times continually change, and as they change, styles and modes of living change with them, and there is usually nothing we can do about it Some changes are for the good others for th bad While Old Father Time brings about many changes that are against our liking he is never- theless the greatest healer No matter how badly you feel today, how much grief is tossed your way, how black the future looks, in another day a week a month or a year the picture is usually entirely different Time will ev- en erase the gravest sorrow caus- ed by death or sickness On the other hand, time has wrought some changes that are definitely a hindrance in maintaining the highest moral standard among all people Take for example the way young people entertain themselves today compared with a few years ago Skating and sleighride parties, skiing jaunts, long hikes, and m the summer, horseshoe, baseball, Softball, pic- nics, and so forth, are now only occasional indulgences The younger set seem to favor juke box joints, dance halls, and road- houses over the great outdoors, and they don t know what they're missing Yet, it seems to be the inevitable trend of the times There are no angels on earth, and not one of us, however good we may think we are, hain't a few bad features Keeping our young folks in the beet surroundingt, with the best company, and pro- viding the best in healthful en- tertainment are not just idle possible moral in the world qf today and tomorrow These are things that must be continually worked hard at, re- gardless of the times t The Council on Foods and Nu- tritions of the American Medical Association concludes that Vita- mm-A fortified margarine is equal in digestibility and energy value to other food fats, and that it can be substituted for butter in the diet without any nutritional disadvantage tven after that well take butter any old time Plan Program County Sheepmen By W. C. Liifenieia lU Una luIR munlty will be interested in a Sheep and Wool Day program to be given Monday, February 18, at the village in Green Lake The program will begin at 9 45 a m At noon a fret lunch will be served, and the afternoon program will continue until 3 45 p m In addition to talks by pro- minent specialists there will be movies, exhibits, and a general discussion Attendance prizes v.ill also be given Five Speaaon The meeting is sponsored by the Wisconsin Co-operative Wool Growers Association in co-oper- ation with the extension service of the College of Agriculture, the Wisconsin State Department of Agriculture and the fcquity and Central Co-operatives Up-to-the minute discussions ol all pnases ot production, man- agement and marketing will be given by James J Lacey and I F Hall of the College of Agri- culture, R E Fisher of the State Department of Agriculture, and representatives of Equity or Central, as well as one of the di- rectors of the Wool Growers As- sociation and Its manager Several Topics Topics which will be consider- ed mrlude "Better Returns from by Prof James J Lacey, "Diversification with by Prof I F Hall "Looking Ahead with by R E Fisher, "Feeding and Marketing by a representative of Equity, "Our Wool by R E Richards1 and "A Growers' by Gavin Mc- Kerrow, a director of the Wool Growers Association A cordial invitation is extend- ed to all sheep breeders and oth- ers interested in raising sheep Adopt Different Style State Deer Conditions Under Investigation Madison Deer conditions are under investigation by the Con- servation Department this win- tu- ,r, ag nf 71 nf Wisconsin leaving 23 counties where deer are not sufficiently numerous to warrant a study, the department said today Wardens Conduct Study The deer study in each county is carried on by the regularly as- signed Conservation w a r de n with additional field men assign- ed to help wherever such help is deemed neressarv The investi- gators have the aid of the De- partment Deer Study Committee Much of the mvestigational ef- fort is directed toward the 28 northern and central counties where the following number of field men are at work Douglas, three Bayfield three Burnett one Washburn one Polk one Barren, one. Sawyer five Rusk two Iron three Ashland two Price two, Taylor, one Chip- pewa, one Eau Claire one Clark two Jackson two Wood one Monroe one Adams one Juneau four Vilas four Flor- ence, one Oneida four, Forest four Marmette two Lincoln o 1 OcontA two "Ar" Cognties I'nder Stady There are 20 agricultural counties now under study by wardens and these counties sup- ply a great part of the annual volume of farm complaints about crop damage by deer Thwe counties are St Croix Dunn Pierce Pepm Buffalo, Trempeal- eau LaCrosse Grant Rich land Iowa Sauk, Columbia, Mar- Keeping pace with a pro- gram to improve the readibil- ity of this newspaper, and yet make the setting of the type as ensy as possible, a different style headline has been adopt- ed for The Tribune and will be used from on Formerly, the drop line headline, a deck of two or more lines characterized by a slant to the right, was used With this issue this type of headline is discontinued, and the flush left head inaugurat- ed The latter is a deek of one or more lines with each line shorter than the full width of the column and set against the left margin The lines prefer- ably are of unequal length It's a matter of opinion which headline the drop line or the flush looks the best Set properly, the latter is pL-purr- ly, in the case of The Tribune, it saves time in writing and setting the headline and more can be said with less construc- tive effort I Portage, Waupaca, Marathon Shawano and Door The department dedans that m one way or another havt become a problem in all lections of Wuconsin, with the exception of the extreme aoutbm put of the SUte and populous area fronting on Lake Michigan. Egg Production In 1945 Almost Reached Record Output of 1944 While unusually high, Wiscon- sin egg production during the past year fell short of the 1944 record by four per cent, accord- ing to the Crop Reporting Ser- vice of the Wisconsin and United States Departments of Agricul- ture Fewer Layers The decrease in egg production for 1945 was the result of a i mailer number of layers as the rate of laving per 100 birds was higher than in the previous year About 2 31S eggs were produced on Wisconsin farms during 1945 While the second 1 irpest production on record for the State, egg production last vear was 96000000 eggs below the prev IOIK year Monthly esti- I mates of egg production that more eggs were produced in December 1845 than in De- icember 1944 but the monthly totals for the rest of the >ear show a smaller production Prices Throughout the year the num- i her of layers on farms during 1 lois tmallvr thin wan 1 >hown in the monthly estimates If or 1944 Favorable prices for eggs and good feed supplies throughout the year encouraged a high rate of laying Egg pro- duction per layen in 194S continued to average higher than for the corresponding months of 1M4 Winter Harvest Is Started Jack Moore, Former Dalton Boy, Discharged Pfc Jack Moore, son of Mr and Mrs William Moore of Dal- ton, visited friends in Kingston, Friday, having been honorably discharged from the Army Air Force the previous Wednesday at Camp Atturbury, Indiana His discharge last week rounded out three years and 23 days of ser- Vice in various camps in the States He was last stationed at Baer Field, Fort Wayne, Indiana daughter1 of Sioux City, Iowa, Joined him at Dnlton where they are spending a brief visit They expect to return to Sioux City sometime next week Their future residence depends o n what part of the midwest Mr Moore s Sioux City firm desig- nates as his sales territory ELMEB WILDE SELLS FARM TO MARLAND LOHRY In a transaction closed last Monday, Elmer Wilde, R R Markesan, sold his farm to Mar- land Lohry, a neighbor The lat- ter, and a brother, Russell Lohry plan to operate the two farms to- gether The Wildes as yet, haven t any definite plans for the future In the same neighborhood a deal was closed some time ago whereby Rudolph Frederick pur- chased the John Welk farm The Fredericks expect to move by Ajjiil 3, but operate their farm where they now re- side Mrs. S. F. ffien, Former Resident, Passed Away Word reached here last week that Mrs S F Kien, 48, of Mil- waukee, the former Lucybelle Grossman of Kingston, died sud- denly February 5 at the Milwau- kee Emergency Hospital after suffering a cerebral hemorrage Last rites were conducted Friday at the Frantz Funeral Home, Mil- waukee at 1 30 p m with buri- al at Pilgrim's Beat Tame To KlnrsUn In Mrs Kien, daughter of John and Lucy Harmer Croswian, was born February )7, 1897 in the I Town of Springvale Fond du Lac 'County In 1915 she moved with j her parents ind family to Kmgs- ton. Green Lake County, where she resided until her marriage on March 23 1924, to Stephen F Kien of Milwaukee She later lived in Detroit Mi- chigan and Fond du Lac Wis For the past four years the fam- ily has resided at Milwaukee She is survived by her hus- band, two children Harriet of Kingston, and Clemens of Mil- waukee, two grandchildren Ro- bert and Audrey one sister Mrs Harriet Sphtgaber, Lamartine, and five brothers Wayne of El- dorado, John of Oakfield and Frank, Dean and Lynn, all of Kingston Pallbearers were Milo Deuts- cher Eugene Miller, Richard R.tJafi, Ear' Grcgct, W >b-- U- ban, and Roman Peterson Few words, big results, little gianU- Tribune Want ads Experiment show that alfalfa as a rule is not the first choice of bees as a tource of pollen Pardee Five Drops Second Game; Markesan Now Leads TEAMS MAT MEET AT RIO TOURNAMENT NEXT WEEK The Pardeeville High School basketball team lost its second conference game of the season last Thursday night when Ran- dolph upset them 34-30 on the former champs home flour This drops them to second place in the Dual County Conference with Markesan in the lead The count now stands Markesan won 12 and lost one Pardeeville won 11 and lost two Green Lakers Upset Markesan Five, Tuesday In a non conference game last Tuesday nigh' Coach McMahon's Markesan five lost to "Goldie" Eggleston s ecn Lakers, 27-31 Earlier in thi season the Green Lake basketeirs were also the victors in a ime played on their home floor nd Markesan was out to avenp  in the month falls on that date, the meeting will be held a week earlier thin The meeting last month was cancelled because of bid wea- ther and to avoid (onfusion, was net held at all All and anyone else interested are urged to be present KINGSTON FIRE DEPT Darrell Wilde Through OCS; Is Now Lieutenant On Monday 2nd It Dtrrell F Wilde arrived at the home of his parents Mr and Mrs Flmer tide R R Markc'an to spend a furlough after having graduat- ed from Officei s Candidate acnooi at run bill unlailoma Lt Wilde was commissioned last Friday at exercises held at the school He will report for duty again at Fort BraRK N C on FPbruary 23, where he expects ot spend from six to eight weeks After completing training there he will be overseas The Markesan fue maintained I good Green I-ake team, frustrat- fir lAflpiif Iciri list wwk by ert trimming Poynette 42-27 at the The boyt experienced more High School gym Par- i tough luck w ith free throws Al- deeville and Markesan both play though the t; .me was mostly nip their last league game Friday and tuck Green Lake had a night the former at Cambria and slight edge and maintained a Markesan at Fall River If Mar- lead throughout the latter loses this last game and three quar'e Bender with his Paraeeville wins metis, it would one-hand lor -i shots, ana Man- again tie the two teams for first 'hey under 'he basket dumped nlace in the Dual Conference If them in as usual A slick one- both teams win Markesan wins hander by n msmoor in the last the pennant I few minute'- of the last quarter, H. the team, brightened According tr> unofficial conn'Krably for Marke- the tournament will be held at san, but it too late Rio February I Baeaad Leaea Toe These reports also indicate that In a somewhat (crappy con- Markesan will play in the upper test, the Green Lake High School bracket of the tilt, Pardee- j aecond team beat the vllle in the lower If both teams "B" (Mm by a ilifht margin of win they may be matched again. IS-I1 "Bill" Dalton Still In Pacific; Was Promoted In a letter dated February 2 and received earlier in the week by Mr and Mrs Kenneth Ual- ton, of Dalton their son "Billy" of the U S Navy states that he is still on his Pacific 'Isle, where the temperature in m the 90s all the time His unit is building a 200-bed hospital which is nearly completed, and as the island has been taken ov- c- bj 4Vc P-r American Lines he expects to leave soon The letter further stated that he had recently been promoted to Ship's Cook Seaman Fir--t Class Bill said he hoped to get batk to the States for a leave in the near future but it was nit definite Regarding his work, he gets up at 4 30 morning, but don t mind it so much now that I'm used to it Also, he acknowledg- ed letters from dene and 'Jim' Crotsman, and expec- ted to catch up on letter writing soon Another note of was that an atomic bomb toM wat to be executed Mar then aawebiM m Ifay "BIH" conehMM- "I hope to be mowed by HIM, be- Recent Trends Change Hybrid Corn Outlook Two factors may serve to tighten the supply of hybrid seed corn available in Wisconsin for the coming spring season information received by the State Department of Agriculture during the past two weeks, indi- cates The first is an increasing out- of-stote demand for Wi consin- grown seed according to Henry Lun? in charge of the depart- ment s Seed and Weed Labora- tory The other is an indication that there may be more seed rorn of low fermm tio i than had been earlier in the season If much more than the usual amount of hyViH sped corn is shipped out of the State Lunz said it may materially affect the availability of eeil in Wis- stocks are limited" Lunz said Wisconsin seed corn producers are receiving an unusual number of inquiries from out-of-state buyers He again urged farmers to or- I der and take deliveries of hybrid seed corn as early as possible in order that an even distribution of available stocks throughout the State might be secured Last Services On Sunday For Mrs. Alien, Markesan Funeral services were held Sundaj afternoon in the Mar- kesan Methodut Church for Mrs Etjith Allen, 75 who passed aw ly suddenl} at noon on the previous Thursday at her home n Markesan The rues were m charge of the Rev M J Gor- danier local pastor Interment was m the fimily lot in the Fncsland Cemetery Lived In Kingston S3 Years Afo Ldith L Daitt w is born March 15 1870, ti) Mr and Mrs Edward Dartt of Wilton Wisconsin Dui- mg her cirly childhood the tam- ily moved to the State of Neb- raska She wai united in marriage to Henry L Allen on March 16 1899 at Blackbird Nebraska Dunns the first few years of m i i r j their home In Minneapolis Minn From thcT they moved to King- ston Wisconsin ami about 33 veors ago came ti Markesm For many ycais she hid boon a faithful membei of the Metho- dM ihimh They bciarm tin Clients children Fred L of Wauke- sha Maude RK hards Mirke'.an Flsie Maria who died at the ase of five years Ralph E of Wau- kegan, Illinois Floyd H of Mir- kesan and Mrs Bessie Han on of Milwaukee Mr Allen pteced- ed her in death April 21 1943 Besides the five childien she is survived by one sister Mrs Maude Fuller of O Niel Nebras- ka seven grandchildren and many moie distant relatives Jerome Plath, Willard Hplloway, Enlist In Air Force at Fonddu Lac Jerome Romie' Plath, son of Mi and Mrs Richard Plath, and Willard Hollowuy, son of Mr ni I I ir 11 rt R Maikesan went to Fond du Lac oik Wednesday of last week where they enlisted in the Armv Air Corps On Wednesday Feb- nnrv 27, they nil lepnrt ot the Induction Ccnlpi nt Milwaukee for examination ind induction into the s( rv ice AAA Mailed Blanks for Milk Subsidy Payments According to word from the county Triple A Office applica- tions for milk subsidy payments for October November and De- (ember Invp hwn milled to the fanners of Green Lake County If you failed to leceive your ap- plication, AAA officials ask that you mail your statements for the above three months to the coun- ty office at once as the deadline date for making payments is Fe- bruary 28 cause that's pretty powerful ttuff to HMM around with Former Buffalo Girl Runs Famous Canary Hatchery in Beaver Dam (Editoi s Note The following, taken from a Benver Dam rews- paper, is of interest to readers in this vicinity because Mrs Giese was formerly Misi Molhe Dixon t rr t t r Mrs Martin Farrell Tribune correspondent from that dis- trict Beaver Giese can- ary hatchery operated as a com- mercial project by Mr and Mrs I-awrence Giese for the past 12 years is the 1 of its kind in the United States according to a representative of the Birds Association of America who re- centlv visited the hatchery Mrs Giese the active member of the firm has set four large rooms m her home for this purpose and during the summer months uses a large garige Dur- ing the past season 1 200 birds vcrc i. PKC 1 V ery state in the Union Ohio Penitentiary is a large Several nundred birds are alwavs at the hatchery The bulk of the birds go from :he Giese thitchery to dealers in he largest cities In the United States epch year, approximately birds are purchased for laboratories and other experi- mental work The year previous to the outbreak of the war. 144 nan vfr from Germany People from all parts of the nation have come to Beaver Dam to inspect the Giese Hatch- ery which is open most after- noons "If It'i New Call Kingston 13-2"   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication