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Kingston Spy Newspaper Archive: October 25, 1945 - Page 1

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   Kingston Spy, The (Newspaper) - October 25, 1945, Kingston, Wisconsin                               THE KINGSTON SPY "A Home Owned Newspaper Devoted to the Interests of the Home Folks." THE WAX IS ovn: WORK TO KEEP THE PEACE! VOLUME 64 PUBLISHED WEEKLY KINGSTON, WISCONSIN, TH URSDAY, OCTOBEK 25, 1945 PRICK A YEAH NUMBER 1 IN THIS COLUMN By E. W. W. 11 lllfll vtllu O.IU half as much as men who claim to kiiuiv liuw things ought to be done, life would really be a pain in the 4 Last Saturday saw the largest turnout lii-re of pheasant hunt- ers since prewar days. Not only dici local sportsmen take part en masse, but a record number of visitors also. It is generally con- cluded that there are fewer birds thii year, and as a result, more disappointed hunters. The experts say that the heavy rainfall dur- ing tht> summer hindered the hatch, and that foxes are taking a toll of birds. Oscar Walthrrs. local sportsman east of tnwii, reports that it is a common tlmig mi hi- farm to find small heaps of pheasant feathers along v.ilh plenty of evidence that Mr. Although many foxes are shot each year, they seem to be in- steadily, and are prob- ably the greatest menace to the pheasant population. One report fiom Minnesota indicates O.at in the area around Alexandria, fox- es have taken such a heavy toll of upland birds that pheasants are almost extinct. A great deal is being said and written about Socialism, Com- munism, Fascism, and a dozen and one isms which defii vari- ous parties and forms of govern- ment in the world today. As a whole they mean that the gov- ernment is the whole cheese. Just as much is being said and written about democracies, of which only a few remain. From its founding to the present day the United States has been a great c o u n I r BE- CAUSE THE PEOPLE THEM- SELVES RUN IT AND PUT THEIR REST AND UTMOST EFFORTS INTO RUNNING IT RIGHT. IT IS TRULY THE CREATF.ST DEMOCRACY. While oilier counuiea leu prey to uicia- tors, due mostly to the peoples' iiiilifferi-iiL't! to begin with, we liaxc jtill mtiiiugcd to stay on an even keel. Yet, experts are warn- ing that we are surely heading lor Socialism, some even saying ih.it it la already too late to do anything about it. We disagree that it's too late, but the situa- tion demands everyone's atten- tion. There are in the U. tremble at the thought of the people themselves running a country, and believe that a select, competent few should have the whole say. If these few could be trusted, it might work, but we should know by now that no group is unerr- ing, and if we didn't have the power to oust them when neces- sary, our democracy would be sunk. The only answer is a re- newcd and intelligent effort by the por.ple themselves to keep our democracy alive. It will take genuine ami acme- iiiLcieai by all of us in the smallest form of vil- I.-'KO government on up to our administrative body in Washing- ton. It means keeping up on the of the day and the legisla- tion to be inucteti. It means keep- in frequent touch with your senator and congressman con- rt. rising these- and at this point we wonder how many citizens scnt.'itivps in Washington or Ma- clinMi. Keeping our democracy alive also means that you ai every election and take part in all civic attend fire department meetings. If the indifference and unwillingness "t the iommon man to partici- r.ate i.-. not overcome immediate- ly, it's a safe bet that democracy v.-ill fly out the window, and the Fmvrnment will crack the whip nt every turn. have yet to meet the per- ron who likes it said that he or she i- getting old. Women, we Ixlieve. are more touchy about syujvvt iii.ni idtn. Yt.-t. reminded of one fellow who was years old for four straight because he hated crossing the rrKirk. Women usually stay T r thrrt? or four years any- v.-.v--. As for your-: truly, we still ii, clascpd with the "youn- i'i-r generation." although we're f.iiHTowing that stage fast. The ii.tiux of strangers from "the ity" duo to the hunting sea- son -brings many a "Hey Buddy, urn-re is mis or liiat oiiu we find that the "Buddy" part .9i.t haiJ to take a! all. We cx- to use a cane someday, but naht now we like to think we're still a young duffer. t And now the rtory is told of the woman who telephoned her '15 Crop Season Hectic But Generally Good Wisconsin's 1945 crop season will be remembered as an excep- tionally short one, but also one of abundant feed stmnlips. Cron production for the Nation as a whole is expected to be one of the largest on record, according to Walter H. Ebling, statistician for the Crop Reporting Service of the Wisconsin and United States Departments of Agriculture. Unusual weather during Wis- consin's crop season benefitted pastures, tame hay, and small grains. The short growing season, However, was not favorable to the corn crop, which did not ful- ly mature on many farms. Pota- to production is large on a rela- tively small acreage, and the to- bacco crop is the best in a num- ber of years. Canning crops have twen above average, but the fruit crops have been unusually mall. FAIR CORN CROP In spite of many setbacks, the ly well. With so much of the acreage used for silage it has been possible to save much of the corn which was immature. The State has a record corn acreage this year, and the crop now esti- mated at 105 million bushels Is about a fourth above average, although nine per cent below the 1944 production. Pastures have furnished excel- lent supplies of feed since early spring. Tame hay production of over seven million tons this year is 15 per cent larger than last year's crop and nearly 30 per cent above the 1934-43 average. Yields of tame hay have averag- ed nearly two tons per acre. Yields of oats, barley, and spring wheat were the highest in the State's history. Oat yields for the State averaged 51.5 bushels per acre, which is nearly IB bushels per acre above average. The 154 million bushe'.f, of oats produced in the State this year is a record. For the Nation, the outlook for feed crops is generally good. All sections of the country, except a lew soumwesvern ana norinwesi- ern have targe Joed supplies. Late full pastures are well above average. The corn crop is now a little larger than expected earlier, yields of grain have been high, and there has been a better than average tame hay crop. STRIKES EVEN AFFECT SPY You have probably noticed by this time that the readi- print section of the Spy, which we receive from Milwaukee each week, has been minus its regular features in this and last week's issue. This is due to a strike of the Typographical Union of Chicago, and until the mess is settled there, we ask you to please bear with us. Preparation for Winter Is Important Fall Task "October, always a busy month on the average Wisconsin dairy farm, with silo filling, clover hulling, potato harvesting, and apple picking the order of the day, also calls attention to the important job of getting the farm dairy ready for 'winter produc- says H. J. Weavers of the Uairy division, siale uupaiuriem of agriculture. The arrival of the first baby calves reminds the dairyman of the busy winter season ahead. The wide-awake dairyman, there fore, sandwiches in between his regular fall work the repair jobs necessary to make his herd com- fortable during the winter. These jobs include window washing, dcor repairs, and cleaning, brush- ing and scrubbing walls, ceilings, floors, and stanchions. The white wash job. if it has not already j been applied, is put on, and the barn is put in shape to do its part in producing high quality milk during the winter months ahead. "But the wide-awake dairy- man does not stop Weav- said. "He checks the well and pumping equipment to nuke sure i that a plentiful supply of pure water will always be available for his herd and for milk cool- ing. The barnyard gets its share of attention because the dairy- i man that exercise for the herd in a clean, graded yard is beneficial. He therefore thor- oughly cleans the entire oern- ration board, anxiously inquir- ing of the clerk: "My son is 'in the Southwest Pacific, and he writes me he hasn't enough points to return home. Can you give me some points 50 that I may send him Behind Jhe Eight Ball UU M-. Ik I W School To Stage Carnival Oct. 31 AU Are Invited; Starts At p.m. Wednesday Tht' pupils and teachers of the Kingston State Graded School arc making extensive plans for the Ne'ewollah carnival which will be staged at the next Wednesday evening, Octob- er 31. The program begins at p. m. anil everyone -whether .vim live in this district or is cordially invited to attend. For the past two years the lias presented a cummun- ily party once a year, nnil the fun anil entertainment derived should make everyone linik tor- I ward ti next week's carnival. 'Tlie this year was named iMelle.l backwards and was so by popular vote of the pupils. the rei-ent riifurcing i' in Wiscon- .tini s ol' I'hanef when1 the sel- 1111; uf lirkrts js- ifivuh't'il, tliiTO been onoufb new foatures Hided to the carnival this year i> make it as interesting as ever. Itemoniber the date next Wed- nesday night, October 31. Fire Dept. Will Have Drill Today at 4 O'clock Nation To Observe Navy Day Saturday 23 United States Navy Ships Bear State Names Dalton Man Home From Dakota Pheasant Hunt George Born of Dalton return- ed Sunday from Redfield, South Dakota with his limit ol 40 pheasants, having hunted in that section during the past week. Mr. and Mrs. Born, accompanied by Mrs. Morris l.nwson, left for Redfield, October 13, and spent tiie week there with Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kopplin, Mrs. Lawson's parents. George reports that pheasants are just as plentiful in South Da- kota as stories indicate. He states that it would no possible to (jet uueV limit of 40 birds in a day or two, but that the law only per- mits u take of eitjiiL a roosters and four hens. With gas- oline rationing over, people from every state in the Middle West are taking part in the big hunt out there. A nonresident license costs and a permit to trans- port the gair.e home is also re- quired. The latter may be secur- ed from the Wisconsin Conserva- tion Department free of charge. South Dakota offers a cleaning service, where at several places in the State, pheasants are pick- ed and drawn and then packed in ice for the trip back home. The cost on 40 birds, according to George Born, amounts to about 40c apiece. yard surface, filling in low spots. The thoughtful dairyman also checks the road leading to his farmstead, which is traveled daily by the milK hauler, wain- ing low spots and filling them with crushed rock or gravel." Getting the farm dairy ready for winter production is an im- portant job and an important part of Wisconsin's quality milk production program because it makes quality production easier and adds to the appearance of the farmstead. If you have something to buy or sell, try a Spy Classified ad. Soft Corn Supply Ups Beef Cattle Feeding Wisconsin's large volume of immature corn apparently has resulted in an increase in cattle feeding, figures on permits for feeder cattle imports issued by the State Department of Agri- culture indicate. Permits for shipping feeder cettle into the State have shown r.n increase of nearly SO per cent for the first nine months of 1945, as compared with the same peri- od last year, records of the de- I partment's Division of Livestock hanilatmn reveal. 1 to September 30 of this Wisconsin feccl- IMJ, sccuicvl puiiVuU fi.r in head, as compared to for the same period in Dr. V. S. Lnrson, chiel of the division, announced. Permits granted this year include steers to be shipped in on health certificates, 7.825 steers on feed- er permits, and 401 heifers and bulls under one year of age. A desire to provide an outlet for utilizing effectively as much as possible of the 194S crop of soft, immature corn early in the season is believed to have caus- ed the marked upswing in de- mands for feeder cattle. "Feeding studies show that soft corn has a good feeding va- lue if it can be fed early in the Larson said. "Fattening feeder cattle during the fall months would enable farmers to obtain efficient utilization of uolli tuu auft CTlb bing." Normally, department records rovciil, the heaviest shipments nf feeder cattle into the State takes place during the months of Oc- tober and November. WHA was the first station in 'he nation to conduct a FM education institute. It attracted including the invent- or of FM. Another Marquette Boy Discharged from Army Technician Fifth tirade Fred Lischefski of Marquette. a vetw- an of 3'i! years in the Army In- fantry, received an honorable i discharge Thursday (today) at Fort Sheridan, 111. j In the service since March 30, 1D41, Corp. Lischefski saw ser- vice in Iceland. England, North Ireland, and in France. Sine V-E Day. he has been serving j with occupational forces. I He arrived in Newport News, Virginia on October 12, and spent ,ents, Mr. and Mrs. J, A. Uschef- i .ski, before to Sheridan for jl.i.i dl.-chirgi-.. IIu t'.vu broth ers still in the service: Benjamin in France, nnil Hubert in Savan- ni'li. Cieurgiii. I Medical Group Lists i Fads Concerning Food i Madison. Oct. and fallacious ideas about fowls con- j tinue to says the State Medical Society. The Society has prepared a list uf questions and answers relating to the more common ones some ol which arc: (Q.) Du berry or grape stills lodge in the appendix and cause appendicitis? (A.) No. (Q.) May acid fruits and milk be eaten (A.) Yes. It is true that some fruit juices and milk curdle, when combined but the digestive juices of the stom- icil alt.- .a iu itnu LUiJil; llutlv anyway. (Q.) Does ri.oking in alumin- um vessels cause cancer 01 ntlicr diseases? (A.) No. (CJ.) Is it safe to store canned food in tin; can after it has been opened? (A.) Yes, the food will keep just as well as in any other container. Tin- danger of spoil, ago does not come from the can, comes in contact with the food after the can has been opened. All foods should be covered and kept under refrigeration because bacteria growth is retarded un- der those conditions. 
                            

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