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Kewaunee County Enterprize Newspaper Archive: August 28, 1861 - Page 1

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Publication: Kewaunee County Enterprize

Location: Kewaunee, Wisconsin

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   Kewaunee County Enterprize (Newspaper) - August 28, 1861, Kewaunee, Wisconsin                             m DECKER, PUBLISHER FOR PHOQRESS, AND HOME INDUSTRY AHD PKOFRIETOH, VOLUME 3. tTHE tBRY IIV Decker, pllblishei, KEWAUNEE, MISCELLANY arc 'able-bodied men-thirty of who, en black man has his ma9. '......J ITUOI are men la Gen. Butler on the.. Contraband ter, or his mastc.r'fle'd from DiU'AUTMKNT OF RATRS OK ADVKRTISINC! Knell Ilui-rlliui of Hvi. Um: riilyiniiuiii-year. I'm- li.-iir column niic yciir. OIK: Ivurlli column nmiyvnr. One linir column Inri-i: nioiiili.i. ftoiirlii column tlirco inoiitlu. S Hi.nn ENT OF} f ily so.) ft LAKH rPhe UNION is a new, largo and mu I r with J. J. If. AI.IiKy, I'roprlptnr. tothw of llni with MO.VROK, July OL) Cameron. See'y of War- ,m order rcccivcd-.on the morning of the 26th of July from Majer-General Dix, by a tele- graphic order from Lieutenant-Gen- eral Scott, I was commanded to for- ward, of the troops of this depart- ment, four regiments and a half in- cluding Col. Baker's California Re- iracnt to Washington via Baltimore. This order reached me at 2 o'clock A. M., by special boat from Balti- 175 women, 225 children unde heageof ten be tween ten and eighteen years, and many..more coming 'Ttfc: lions which this state of things prc sents are very embarrassing. shall be done them? and What is with emanated M. Ijivwii County, hull' u OuiliMlJu Ulinrcli. more. Believing that it because of some pressing exigency for the defence of Washington, I issued my orders before daybreak for the embarkation of the troops, sending those who were among the very best regiments'I had. In the state and condition Upon these questions'I instructions of the Department. The first question, however, .may perhaps be answered by considering the last. Are these, men, women! and children slaves they free? Is their condition that Vmen, wbi men, and children, or of property, or is it a mixed relation What their gtattu was under the Conslitu- m Indeed, how born to be A gentleman of character and reli- abihty, who has lived at the South for. more than thirty years, "has just1 mvoH -V _ and furnishes an j States i The the- distinguished one more or less a fugitive because 'he labored upon the rebel nients? If so lub to be harbored. By the reception of which arc most to be i Ti distressed, betaking those who have W the wrought all their rebel masters de- r mUch ccascd': A marked their battery or those there was -.V good rho have refused to labor and kft Sa'd taking Wash-' he battery unmasked., Philadelphia and Ifew-York; I have very the-v" thoroughly counted on' a iqn and the laws, We all know. AND (JKNKltAl, "U'.MU. in town nl' Cirvt-ii IJiiy, milo north i 185.0. lyr day they Xavier Martin. VTOTAItV I'UBUCANO GUXKIlA -i. T tiII Edward Decker- JU'KT -VOTAKV I'dll. 3- C- Saltzman, I'll V.SfCIAN AM) .SUHCKO.V. ..n tClli.x K.-WIIMI...... L- P. Congtton. Ciirnur ol KIliK unit .Muin.Slrcul.% course of tho were all embarked BaUimorV, with the exception of some 400, for whom! had not transportation, al- i had all the transport force hands of the quartermaster here, to aid the bay line of steamers, which by the same order from the I-ieulenant-genenil, was directed to furnish transportation. Up to nnd the time of the had been th. n v- ttll JLIJU1T. What has been the eflect of and a state of war upon that status When I adopted the theory of treating the able-bodied no "TO fit to work in the trenchos.as property, liable to be used in aid of rebellion and so contraband of war, that con' d.tion of things was in so far as met, and I then and still I have very decided opinions up- the subject :0f. this order. It snot become me to criticise it, and L write in no spirit of but simply to explain the. cullies that surround the enforcing it. If the enforcement of that der becomes the.polic'y of the r.-, mnnl T .._ and the judgment of the Court of Michigan c ,n, was sustamea. Plus question .-has. been decided in ways by. different courts, but has now been at rest by the above decision. That decision, al- a hardship to the plaintiffs, be hailed with joy by th, whole and, had the decision been the other way. the result would undoubtedly have been, an amend- of the act to accomplish the EFFJECT Indiana on their Before the dcmonsjlrations aftGr showing a arth, it was thought that it an easy matter' to recori- new guaran- same result, effected by Tribune. which has now the decision__ t. I as a enforce i Butif lefUomyown as you may gath of dis- e -South are some episodes in the life of a soldier, provocative of laughter, and that precincts dustr J I_____ _ r.. .Of' THE YOHK FASHIONABLE York correspondent says v.The as I have Bad tfcc'asion to remark before, has fully fatal to the migratory propen- sities of Madame Fashion for, this' of being "horrid vul- gar" to stay in'town during the hot' months; the practice is receiving the sanction of about all our "first fasa-'i .including the crtmeot Murray Hill, and the Flora' of Madison xou may walk from one' end'of Fjfth Avenue to the other, without encountering a single brown front while in' but a o--------WVAII my reasoning, 1 should take a wide- ly different course from it indicates. 'mnke and constitutional basis. But now a new series of questions arise. by women, the children cannot be treated on that basis; if property, i J.t winch has been customary .for planters.to In a loyal state I would H.raw on bankers-'in 'anticipation: of .errili'i-.urr.otiin j lhii be .done now'.. _ a11 Mate Ol Kreicrhfo ___ preparing for an advance movement be considered the' i'ncum- brance wither than the: auxiliary of an army; and of course, in no relation bould be treated as band. Are they property S. Goodnow Ca. Kllis S'lvut. K-WIIIIIICC. u iissiu'liiii-iit of Drv Creceri.-s. I'l-ovi.sinn.i, C.'liwx, n.; Crockery. Shnt-ji, Iliiu: inn) 1'iMrn J- R. Slauson. Corner of K.lis ami Stivi.-is, K'-'tvuiin.-u. DwiltM1 in (iroocrirn, I'rovi.iioiix, Drv oinl.i. Cl'iihiiif.'. Crocltcrv. Taylor, Cunningham, Co. r.H iii Dry Sliui Criickt-rv. Iliu-.l Hills Carter. Stn-i.-t. CluUiiiig. Hoots. Sliuvii.riii Wiiro, I'rojM'iulorji. Hotilli I'icr. SliiiM Wmiil, Itnrlc mid Steam Boat House. Ciint-jf of Klji.H iintl Mtiin Slrt-ols, Men r tlpj StL-iiin limit IVincliiig, wlu-ro will nlway.s (iiiil youil romns ntid a well Also. sriiMinj; for ioiiin.1. __ CUARLKS MKANOKS. I'rnpriotor. Wisconsiu House. Corner of Klljs niul .Main Ivvwuiinoo. This liousu is .fitiintiMl in llm Iiti.iincss coiitm1 of tho hu.t j-ood ninl u ('roprictor that will spare no [mills to tho bust siitialiiulion in oiJAI.'T.KS DRDA. Walker Simon- A GKNTS I-'OK TMH TltANSACTION XX of nil kinds and money bit.inic.in. Cijvu pat-lictilar nttiMilinn to tho p.-iTinont of inioi-i'st and itixua cm lands Hllll Ui-l'.-rfo all County Olllrors. David Youngs. Al.'ncpoo IViscoiuiii. C'miiini.t.siiMi Mffcliant unit freight Agent. Buys Kailroad 'I'ivf, Charles H. Walker, ATTORNEY AT LAW. M A SI TO W o C WI g CON 31 ,V, Will attend to nil liiMinesj entrusted to hjmJM K.-WIUIIKV- Conniy. _______ Garland. OEl'L'TV CLEtJK CIUCTtT COURT Wincoimin. nny of the by which I hoped to cripple the re- "oifrces of the enemy at Yorktown especially by aeizing a large luantity of negroes who wore being I'Cised into their services in build- "fi- tlie T five days previously been enabled to mount, for the first time, the first company of light artillery which I had been empowered to raise, and they had but a single rilled cannon, an iron C-pounder. Of course every- thing must and did yield to the sup- posed exigency and the orders. This ordering away the troops from this department, while is weakened tho posts sit Newport News, neces- sitated the withdrawal of the troops from Hampton, where I was then throwing up intrenched works to en- able me.to hold the town with a small force, while I advanced up the York or James river. In the vill of Hampton there were a lai number of negroes, composed, in great measure, of women and child ren of the men who had fled thithei within my lines for protection, who had tscapcd irom marauding par- ties of rebels who had been gather ing up able-bodied blacks "to aid contra- If they a In a rebellion I. would confiscate which was used to 'oppose and take all constituted the wealth of that state, and furnished the .means by which than war is prosecuted, beside beinn- the war and if, y very light; of neither U1UI serve to disperse in some measure the ennui of camp life. Not ,oncr ngo, a farmer who did not reside so tar ;from a camp as he wished he did, was accustomed to find ererv morning that several rows of pota- toes had disappeared from his field He bore it some time, but when the' last half of his field of fine to disappear, he began to think that sort of th.iug had gone far enough, and determined to'stbp Accordingly he made.a visit to the camp early neit' morning, and i. them in constructing thoir batteries on the James and York rivers. I had employed the men in Hampton in throwing up intrenchments, and they were working zealously and cfliciently at that saving our soldiers from that labor under the gleam of the mid-day sun. The women were earning substantially their own subsistence in washing, marketing, and taking care of the clothes of tho soldiers, and ratioi were being served out to the me who worked for the support of th were have. been '.left 'by their masters .and owners, deserted thrown away, abandoned, Jike the wrecked wessel upon tlie ocean. Their former and owners have causelessly, traitorously, re belliously, and, to carry out the fig: ure, practically abandoned them to be swallowed up by the winter storm of starvation. If property do they not bacome the property of the salvors but we, the salvors.do not need and will not hold such property and will assume no such ownership; has not therefore all proprietary relation ceased? Have they not became thereupon men, women and children No longer under ownership of any kind, the fearful relicts .of fugitive masters, have thr.y not by their masters'acts, and the state of the war, assumed the condition, which we-hold lo.be the normal one. of those made in God's image. Is not every consti- tutional, legal and moral require- it should be objected that human beings were brought to the free enjoyment liberty and sucli Pardon me for addressing, the Secretary of war. directly upon this qucstion.as it.involvcs some.pol.iticai considerations a, well as propriety of military, action. I am.'.Siivyour ,and a marked dim- inution :in ,the. population in conse- quence, The poorer classes that are left can get nothing to.dp. .Some days there were one. streets of-New" obedient servant, anu amused lumself by.going aroundto see whether were pro- vided with good and wholesome provisions. Ho had not -proceeded far when he found a "boy" just serving up a fine dish of "kidneys .which looked marvelously like those f.n it r. tlia. ose that the gude wife. ..brought to his 1 blind, and ruity bell knot's compared with ordinary are few and far between. Some'of our- merchant princes who had ventured to hire cottages at till Ssp- tember, have given' ihenv up, wisely1 cousiderating that, with pretty much all business at an end, and income and other.war taxes looming np itf the near prospective, that it may'. be the part of prudence, as well patriotism, to practice JEFF. DAVIS ON CRUSHING Biton--' Jeff. Davis .was tary of War, and the Tone- tn _ words ABKAIIAM LINCOLN, AjfD TO.KAT. ing, fine, "Splendid was the reply. ''Where do'yoii' get them 11 Ji ka Legislature was in session in Kan- sas, the present rebel chief.h.ld quite differcnt-viewa of the proper, dealing with reWiron'' manner O from those he now adopts. The Topeka. Legislature was regarded as revolutionary, and on 3d of tember 1856, if r. Secretary Of A Sketch, But by the evacuation o rendered necessary b George N. Woodiu, ATTOIJNUV AT I.AW, JUSTICE Ol'' tlu foaoo and Notary Public. I'm-, iiu'ilur nttcntioii givoii onjfu. MnniNnvnn Wis. K. L. Wing, ATTOKXKV AND COUNSELOR AT LAW. Will promptly uttcnrf to collection of of tuxos anc' entrusted tu cure. Aua-puc, Jan. 03tli, 1861. children. Hampton. the withhrawal of troops, leavin me scarcely men outside th fort, including the force at Newpor News, all these black people wer obliged to break up their homes a Hampton, fleeing across tho creek within my lines for protection anc support. Indeed it was a most dis- tressing sight, to see these poor creatures, who had trusted to the protection of the arms of the United States, and who aided the troops of the United States in their enterprise, to be thus obliged to flee from their homes, and the homes of their mas- ters, who had deserted them, and become not fug hives from fear o the return of the rebel soldicrj had threatened to shoot the men who had wrought for us, and to car- ry off the women who had served to n worse than Egyptian, bond- age. I have, therefore, now within the peninsula, this side of Hampton incnt, as well to the runaway mas.: ter as their, relinquished slaves, thus answered? I confess that my 
                            

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