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Kenosha Telegraph Newspaper Archive: December 17, 1852 - Page 1

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   Kenosha Telegraph (Newspaper) - December 17, 1852, Kenosha, Wisconsin                               M. rt'ai thi' year. 5 TJ .mlil Ihr-cfcd.rf IW JMT. j wWukabi' jfcbuvc Uknn Cur inr.il itll aruptld. BY C. BUSINESS CARDS. T. wmrr, Noi.r) fuhllc and t f'.r MItliidWI, 'Jluu, III- 4IMW. rUw Tuik UK! li. Itlimni. Hi.. 'if ili'Wm clulmsfcc.. fi.r In Illinuta uxl 1 nji !..f .t.il.lii.'f. l.mul Ww Toil., of Tllles, kr., I. H. HTM II B. I" in Uw UMftcl I'vun of CliM.-d rhi.n Korrm' fonrto ut nn.I III- Id wrltlnK I" 'Jfllj-. ni'U HricH 111.irk, ly. nr.MKaWTII IIOWI.ANU, :-L.T. nil call- with Uuv t.V'" onk'i- M'll U. ill Hid cimillry, firni I'lllfce will nn-lvu lin- IH want Ms J. El. Jlljun. iKC Ciinifiiiny or In Hie I'lut'Ml rtntillcnloi, d, AKVIH. In Mi.. "li linliil II li'li'rt- i'f l.nmlyi'f, I .nth, t'lllAlvrllltl llnlr. vti, JLC. Vnnl tlie t'lliin- mnr. td50. i. w.  jiutlj Cvlebrnted Olmoted Yarn lgtiit.1. Thin li mi or colgrtnil fctnil Tur UD, iilMl inMijii-i-lor tu liny Iblng of Ihu klliil In iniirlli.-t. t'iT RKME.MBKIl lu cull we wlllalmr you CY'.'iy tiling In the Dry l.iiiollnit IH 10 l853. FALL WINTER CAMPAIGN! BOOTS SHOES, MIIOK.HAKCUV TOOLS, I'lNBlKGS, Ac. r. IS IIKW lib K.M.I, At WlNTETt S'l'liCI! OK hUid by tjhw Mukur-. Hur- Hi fiiilji-nrrrt c-vi-rv vnricty (irihnnf'Htii: Kfisti-rji MntMirucliirott l.tiuhi-r, Cnll' 'I lilt Ul' Kit. Jk1 luu nt-Hniti Iwtinl UUSTOM uoo'i's tt II. Jlt.M u.'fll'ir jri-'. Uur till.I If' r. .v rot iniisi vlL-Aiiml ijunl- hoij i n uiTfU vnrUv i s1! niul I'liilvr llj cim tu: it) titiv Kiii I I'iviith t uml H l> ..r rhH.li'iu'.-n-.H.-.. i'nil itiii'M ifitty Ihuy will tfcl tin ijinxl-i, mul n.t luw ns ;n uti> lluiii.e ur U'f.-t. Price.' WIICI'I.OCK. '11 f.H T I -i K I >rrn H iio, vnil .K f, A.'Mt.' UK ;..r. U'MI.MH- H t'tttttly I'rtijit j T o b a c c o li in j> o r i u 111, Snh.wilii.T." inlti- llilf uiiillioil Inliirinini; fur Ili'i- .siilt> n; nil kinds, ul' SlllllT, in: A i) A- 1. UV.l sill .I, N .ft! -fn lltl S. II, Mf, jon> i 4'lork Mini 'tukrr, I l.ii in tlif nf Ki'il-'- UI..I It. in .'.liy. li 'I. In' In.-' J.lst IL-i'i-ivril ft ..I ...v .''I- I .Ml I......I. K.Thlllilil.'. i.niril. J -ih.-r. Hli. I II. un I'uliiln, SlhiT MI..T Pi.il. .I i.n.t llnlliinln t 'I u.. r...'iri .in.t Miur II. n-IiJi I nnd i.ll.cr t" n-.llin." .''reach, ttrid cnmwfm Fttney .'S. Utui Tl'l-ilCCU (n tuI.liLii.u they j tin llllllll ll Lllill WL'll il'JL'CltJil :t--rii.irL- I. KIMlH. salt, iflolnH- And tlnil ''.nn ''.ir ill Illnl lint', wliicli ilicy -tinl trill, -ell us clii'iiplv Inr obltunuil In tlil.H ur nnv Hiln-r Wi.-i1. klnili, far unit cou1.- hit; ih'Mil.- I'M- Id.' ri.OI II .il'iln. I'm pi I'n'v ..r-. InU-lul liy n slrlcl iitlriillnii I" lln-ir hv niinunl In mi-ril tin- liitir..nnxi; ul'lLt' fif' Iltm-k. K. S. T'.IIHIIV. v 4 .Irni'try. Ac., II. BI.'I t. la.li fi.t I'l'l KUICKSUS Jnl) 'JH, 5 I'UACTICK JOB PRINTING! V. IIHAMti: in-.-lii.. iTa urcin. will Itike n "Inan nn Hint lii.lruniinl.nl l.u- n s-n-i-.-t. It-uitl n .nit- Irti- i.'l'i. .i'; ii- u'.V- tal. I .hni.-unv.-M in. Mil BLANKS OF ALL KINDS; Sail Cnriln, Hnml ili'i- n-v i.rili..' Mli'n'h ii'iiil liy n i; .lime "I" ui.'tLCr.ivni! .-r tin- is It i-, '.i, .Mil -ii'. M is In n I ..Ul1..' Ttii'llrv. fr.'.-. unit nil! irivvti nl Hie i ll'-'i.....M'l'-i.'-.liii Kv..Miiis. Hi.- -JIM In-i. IIOOK-III x m I.I K.'n.i.-nil, I.-.VJ. Ill a. '...III ;1. ..i-JI J I.I-TI A i Mini: i-I' FOR 8 ONK Al'llK.S of luil in n" mi blnTUI IITIIIS tu LVMAS. t'nrni Kitiiutett 10 mill.- REMO V A L lil" ITIONrV TO I.O.-tN EXTENSIVE SALE OF 11 O O K S O. FlK.Ul. tmic or to llriii. I Thrw tlwi'iiinjt well ia III.: Cily of K_- bjr n. -i. IIK.Ml. .V TO I.O.I N r.. -mini Inipn' i jn, hirtiftx II.- I.I- t-nw I- j AMI vAt.r STANHAKU i s IJA i, '.h n-.u-nl'.'ii. HJ.KII Miii.-t) ..i Mill nnililin'iiv ,r n--.l iiK.ii'. i ur TII IIATM r O fc tii.> I'M; ir. Ai-.d n.'.'k. Kinbi-Histiod r.ml lloiiu- lll'ully buiiin1.. l.l-llrr niul AT., At. Sin i.x tnVe flntl lu'lii'Vi'il lo l.e tho vnliin- _ lil Liillrflloii nf WultKS. ever uOfKr.il Tur -r.ic in Kriu..lni. -VniM.l-. nint unil :ill nthcr.-, ciinheMih ed, ami nt> (wr n-at. nl iht. Mile. 't'hi- nNivc Sim-k will hi'iipi'Miil. In till- rnursi- nl' lim i-'iiniiii; u'fi'k, nmL thi' .nle Mill Inkn llorKIN'S Irvini; Slnre. IKH-Kl.N.s, InJL'tll.AS.. Si CM., Cliii'iian. 3. IrtJ. -J-l BLACKSMITHING. ml S.i 711 Hulci f ailtl I' nniliT.iiliii'il wlitir. In lnrnrni 111? unrt UK ______ ____ al IMltiln- ul welt knuvrnilnnil '.r i-vrjuiiUoiilhi-biMiMi-uur runnel Irfn f'f) I'sn'-fiT j t'i'" nilciuli-il uti u.ttra i-jiri'. Ti.nw wnnllnu anvihitu' ki lu.. rtin! i: t'ur Interul u J. K. I'll hi'n .1 cull. iiioit.ini.. -J'J, I JOHN SIIKT1.IFKK. tni-TSi 'N A TII n nuwni'Mt-'iv ,1 i.fi.-.-1... .IL-.I Mm- U.K. .tir.KHit.i' III Ka-. ir.ni i. Ml oi" in.irki-l.nl St.. M. CO LUT. r li Itnltnn, tkf. fcr., n "I'H'a a MKKHILI. a co. tflTrtH. ,11 iiia ,Nt'W under the Sun. BT of Swollri on the higher; Touched ibe in its tow.sr, the- talc to tell. Forth ru.ihtlic anil all, .At duty's.w at danger's Tiio peril and tlie pruiiM> to share; Their ciiKiutttt rush, Iheir torches flare; The light fire, Kcfjocntd. from -tin church's spire, i tlip ,'uloiicU .wiUi. ruddy., '.7 .TcLla.-of tho.ruin wrought below. Why lounil that midnight tocsin dread i Why towers that column black and red, That, shows The wiiy thnt the 1 Let Tour imagination strotch, And you sbili.scc a. dastard wretch, Skulking aivuy from human sight, Anil wrapt up iii .the clonk of Putting a loeofoco match l Wliuru lie is niire the flume will catch, when the- crowd-is thither drawn, Ho iimv, before "the poop of dawn, With tight migers From own. What are lo him ihti lutrum bell, The roof, the tearful yell Of horses toasting in thnir stalls, Of firemen, crushed by falling walla t What an; to him the. crash und diu Of slates and rafters failing in; Tltt: shrieks of houseless women flying, The fi-cblc gnsp of infants dying, And-the loud of despair, .That toad the sulrbcutiiigair I' What ure all these things.tp.him'! tarn Bv thein is served others bum What is nil this to him sir, He wnki'a nppcoplu, anil they ttir Aiul if they catch tile vi'.htin, lie Is tried, urn! used to be Laws but htstiee does not, alter: IK- escapes, tho he'deserves the halter; And were he doomed u> it ngnin, The people would all.say, Amen And yet ;-now t'ooly let's What docs thi-i cm lire'' Hoards, liny stub- Tiie body's lit'Cj ttn "empjy A vapor, that is seen a day, >r hour; "then vanishcth away That's nil. The felo'n Docs nothing more we need to tell on. But he tiint (ills his neighbor's cup With lifjuid lii'c, is tip, cil'dice fi'anuid of wood, Not mansiotis. fair and lint tluit for whii-li mansions rise The heir apparent the skies: HAin wlio fi'ijin hcavL-n derives his birth, God's Iiere on eiirth, A hoit.se thnt only God can build, A temple, with His Spirit lilled A ti.'iiement indeed, oi' clay, holds its dweller, for his day A house that falls, in lime, in dust, As other earthly inal.tei- must; lint oi-.e that nut burnt itoica, The hi-ii- of an iir.mrmal lltit let the fire thai, till- tin: cup, lie, in. that house well kindled up, strength, ami peace, ami pure desire, And manly purpose feel the lire Ami'reason stumbles on and gropes, 'mid smoibcn-djuys and hopes And laitb, and every upward aim, And heavenward impulse foods the flame And virtue tails, and comiiyL- And childhood in tattered rues, And Want makes enrtli bis bed, Ami homeless 1 Lunger IHIJITS his bread, And sottish mopes along And nmiiiae Mirth brawls out his song, .And 1'Yruy.y stands with vacant stare, And madness rends his matted hair, And Murder stubs his bride, Then.. a suieid-.-. And yet, what is all this tu him Who fills up. to its spar-kliiijr brim, 'J'be intts- of liquid lire, iu deptlis, expire Wit, wisdom, common manhood even, All earthly joy: all hope of heaven to ins inmost sell, says he, is rhe tr> me AViiut is, to the depth of woe, That t'oilows where my liquors tlow Sn as I tin: matiji t-iin as 1 the (ire ran So IIIIIL; as I have my way, So as those who drink, can pay, So as tln-v will serve u-.y HUT., What is't to me how much they burn TLicje two stnnd yon, ton-ii in hand Hutli [lieu1 lill their purges 'i'cll of the two, the worse is jnsl uurly M tnrf thijli and ,A f at.inutaft MeoiAd lo convinoe Abrsliaiii of tha of the case, and in an elevated Abra- ham called bui tb Jfot''Tucker' 'wboMiad fisji'teJ -i; Tnfkcr, thy clog's Let 'era tight it yelled the piigriicious .owner of .-Hrtngo %M I'll bet a Jomd of wood, fay dog doff in town, qnii I VYiJ Millcf'iyusa mild .man pfevis'rbialty let thrown-down by tha stranger frdrh the tiy stirred theigttll the buck: yard slipped his cqllur brindlu cur, strong, powtirt'iil. said.th- exiiilei! Quaker, "thy (loij shall promise dice 'Htke; upon him. Turk', hero boy I" and the went at It. Blob Garter, tlie up in time to hear thu stranger's defiance to the town, and beiit on a fight.witFi.some.bojy tor the insult ami damage" to his wife, clamped the collar of the stranger, and by a series of ten pound ten upon the'face, nnd back'ahd sic'in of liis bully n'ntag- oniht, with his natural sledge hammers, Bobatlr- ring.np ihe sltcngtli of-the bully stranger, t the top pi' his. compass, and then made the .sparks Dy Joe Tuck'er's'dog, reinfi reed by t'hat of Abra- ham Miller's dog, tork a fresh start, and between the two; the stranger's dog was being cruelly put to his tromps'. Deacon Pugli one of the must substantial and pious moil in Frogtown, came up, and indeed whole town was assotn- bling, and Deacon Pujih arin'd w.'uh his heavy walking sticki and shocked at the spectacle be- fore him, miirclieJ up to the dbja, exolaiminj as he did 90 Fio, fie, disgracefull 1 yon men citiiens of and Don't tlico, don't thes strike my dog, Deacon Pugli Abraham Miller, advancing to ihe Duucon, who was ab.nit to und left amiinij the with his eano. Your G'OJS shouteiJ the Deacon with evi- dent (orvor. Nol my dogs, Deacon echoed the What did vpu sav for then shouted the Deacon. T never Kiiid doga, Deacon Ptigh." "You did I" ri'sjwnded the Duucoti with e.x- cilp.tnent. Deacon fuyh, thee upeuks suiil thu Q inker. Von loll aluUehonil, Abriiliiini Miller." Tl'.e utteraa tued-iciuas asseiliuu ted Abrnliam. tell an infernal lie brawl- ed the Deacon. "Thju bus provoked luyt-vil Deacon Pttglt i" shouieil luu slalwai i. and 1 will chastise thee And into the Deacon's woo! wc-nt ihe Q-iak- er. 'J'hc Deacon nothing loth entered inio tin- spirit of iho thing, nnd we leave them llr.is" nip and to look to ihe stranger and Bob Car- ter, who fiiatttl fought and tit until squire Catch- urn ami the toivn c.onstu-bl3 came up and in their attempt to preserve, the peace, and arrest tha of- fenders, the Hquire was ihrnst through the win- dow of u neighboring wiitch-makt-r, lining a heap of damage, while lawyer Hooker, in ut- lenipUi'.g lo aid ihe constable, was iiil ill a mis- take by the furious bliu-ksmith. in tlie short ribs, and went reeling down Gumbo's cellar with frightful velocity. The friends and fellow church men of Deacon I'ughi look sides against the Quaker antagonist, und the shop boys ol Abra _ Of of BeUgimit Sofuty fi-ietuli, -hctyjn tlysaty 'littc. 1'eri, in the sijcik j month, 1IJ52', tq'ttic'Pnfiessori of ttic tmitrtl State. To bring slavery to the test of the precepts of onr Lord Jesus ua suppose oureolves our children, our parents, our brothers and lerj, in the position of tha slave. Let 'Th'e''religious what course of conduct we should, in community a j ihia coudition, deairc and expect from tile follow- eonyicuoii of the incooapMlbility, ot' Slavery vriti Him 'who was sent "tii proclaim liberty, to following cilationm from the writ- profonmlrst aw) nf how 'ffiepapliVes, and the opening of the :pris6n to little binding force, morally, is the infamous Fu- gitive Slave Law: against famhmenta! moralitv, y ujge UcLtatsSupreoM Coan States. ".All derive ilwir force from the law of nature, and those that do not, are accounted as NO [Fortet-nio, Jacob's Law Dic- tionary. If it be found that a former decision in man- ifestly absurd and unjust, it not that subject, j (I'ehT, breufc every'yoke, nnd let the oppressed law, but that it NO There- can bi no doubt that the Cfinrih of Christ free I i A" is lo observrJ between proclaim libcrnt to riiocaptives str'engtlicn onr Chrisiim masters and the .opening of .that, are j'Woald -feel copstrainecf to remove the heary bur- eo' nmn, what is raod and what dot! what ly established atate of things; amfby LiW change is to be is, "When an net of is apainst com- quire of'tribe, but to lio justly, and to love mercy, and to walk biimlily .tl pon them. le "are tlie light tho saitl tliut U set-upon a hill cannot be hid. Neither do men liirht it candle nnd s true thatilavi'ry is cniitinoil to a srcii.in contrary to rcuson, AUK of our country, and is not tinder the conirol of! sMtie. ,j the National.Goyernineui j and it An a--t of rarliarment moy bj VOID from iu th.i: pure ami liolv character, that-will induce otu-( ers to our'-i'athor which in is Ilenven }lllc the manafasttirer ami ilu 'merchant, to whom inc products of slave lab'ir (iirnisl! the material Cor a Incr.'ttive snd the imlividiml whose consumption of those pro- ducts stiKtains tlie manufacturer and the mer- they no connection with slavery U haa been said, Whoso the motive, inakcdhis brother's ain his own." Jluy we nil If such au inquiry, scrupulously conducted, can ivssion that the mcm- re in such .cave on our minds the iiupn :ierr of the Chrisriur. C'hrcli :i a 'eon tion thnt it bo truly said of them; in the Ina- ot' the Ape.s'.le, thiu they children of light, proving whnt isneocptable unto aiut have no f'elluwsbip with the inifruitf.il works of chlrkmss." then ifnlv be eoinfortcd in the o men oc eomiorreu m tnc l tl., ,1 i- i -i that the blossiny of the Lord will rest awn I y ne ,lho 8'lhJ'9l. tho Church, and upon our beloved country for its j W.iother while I reply trading in and consuming Tor thurify to believe lh it nictn'jcr.; of the Church if staiiding in their properaHotuieuis, ".ire the salt j in the produce of slave labor, wo arc nol tntl'-ciJ of the if the propo-i-'d review should re, conviction that the the pre has, iu some below the stitndard ol" its upright original; ftiiO tbiit at v t iu llie ut day, tlu niOtive, tind tiot become- a parly to the system and we Khali be icd in the siji'ht of Him who jndin'ih riglit- e.m.ily, wh'o is indeed u tjod ot knowledge, and by whom actions arc 1 call-i-pon the professors of'Christianity ihrotighoiil Ihe and of our land curtiestlv engaged lo return to it. iirit love, and to iloits'fii-st works? llm "le weight of tlh'ir inllucnce should We arc- nwarc of the sensitive state of foolingre- exerted for ilio removal of this great It is iMctiug the subject of Slavery. Jt is our ilo.siru a solemn tlionjjht that rcirihuiion is ____ _...... i. -n-... i. not to arouse augry diseussion, nor to array section of our couitf.'y in hostile I'ccliug against another. But :n all soberness we would treat the subjuct ns a ipiestion of right, and as iu the pres- imcu of Him who.is lo bo our judge, ouil who has solem'ulv forewarned us, that he will regard tho of deeds of mercy from oven the lowest of our fellow hchigs, as wUhchl from himself. Verily 1 say unto you, inasmuch .as yc did uuc unto one of Llie least ofthcse., yo did it not unlu me." It will he- readily adinittL-d that all who takenpon them the name of Christ are culled ti> "depart from ihat the declaration, t'Kight- consucss exaite-th a nation, but sin is a reproach lo any is a full of truth. Tbe Dc-ity is represented in the holy scriptures as n B finite in power and wisdom, and perfoct in .with the attributes of the Doily. In sacred his- tory wo may trane ihe visitations of Divine ilis- 'pleasure upon a highly favored hut revniiinji peo- ple, showing mat Gml is indeed "icrrible in his duing toivards the children of and lliese. ihinusarc rucordad for uur wurninjr. We. wnuij rcspcclfully invilo ihtiso who claim lo stand as pastors Lo pnoph-, ii> refL-ci upon the importaucu of the they occupy, and the weight of obligation resting upon thorn, faith- fully to Ihe duty they have assiimci.1. nnd cast the weight of their infliu.-n.ee on tlio sidu of justiue and I'ret'dum. ll is lo reflecl upon tiic iirect pro- duced by tiie prt'urliingor lliuGaspel iho pri- i iniiive r.tife ol'the Churcfi, r.pon a people sunk in darkness and I through Ihe reforming influence of this miniMrr, they were drawn lo forsake ihe evil of their way's, und" to "walk ia newness of life." And though uou ritiiir IN yaw a without cnrio'iiy l.o -ee it in a excited, nmi nol vnlrc. qut'iuly 7 liavo no ili.s'.iiH'.t recollection td' having ever seen a se- rinr.s, jiileheil battle between two wi'.ho'itn yt'iicral the [i l.c-ixvecn ItiO ir.vncrs of the ani- tnals fit IJut the most rcmarkttblo on record perhaps, came otl' in on the frnnlicrs of Mawf, home It bcaL nil jiltty nmsse.s ol the kind wu ever l.t-ard of; it engros- sed llie entire funnniumiy in nnc general nulls- crituintitc incltji'; ir.lerininablo suits, or nf ;-.uv of the town, its down- fall ntid ruin, A fanciful petiius named Joe Tucker, a man ubom visabia means nf support----n do iu.uiiir.ir, n totilir.g, c.iyar yiHid sori tif a n yellow doj.'; slick, intelligent, and rnlher pretiy ben.-'t, always at Joe's heels, and known us wi'll as his tnnsicr. and liked far more by the Ono day. Joe nnd his dog were Uunimi'a grocery a great pic- bnld uyly looking Jon, stundiny; of a l ot' his Creator bus b weie ron and women sc.rcami-d i mav be restored ilitxm-'h iai.h in our by transgression, it j or I'a.janisrn vir-ld.-ifto the force oflru furinus, mud anil exci'cd became iho comnrinily. that a cpiiot lookar-on, if they hud boon any, won 1.1 have swortithe evil ones wort- in Projjlowu. A hcdvy lluinJersionn, linully, put un end to Ihfi row llie dogs were muro or less killed, a i h'.Id severely wounded, n man sc-alded, ;i broken, horse run himself 10 owner was beaten awfully by Bub Curler, whose.wife and ihe wives of many oth- ers, were dangerously scared the painter was crippled, dry ruint'il; Quaker mid Dea- con, Lwo Irishmen, Tucker, town consl.ilile. Lawyer Hook >r, Spire Calchrm. and somi: fifty others, whipp -tl. La.w suits onsued, I'iMids Ibllo'.vi'd, and tii3 r.ntirt- peaci: and rep He of Fruiiiuu'n by inurli-'.ble .Lord Christ, and l.y o'K'difiice to !iis Of the prt'ccprs ir.tcre 1 by Ami (i'-uhtless it was, and is, the iicsiir.ii of the I'oree. median-Ivor in-.tneJiatjly, from this i'rici- Whatever is just ia always the Uw nor can this true law either be- oripiiiatrjor rogatod by any writen enactments. "Neither the Senate nor tiie people us any dispensation for not obeying this unirer. sal law ol Against these" (i. e., equity and there ia no prescriptions, or STATUl'K. tut only corrupt H. iiwcl. li The reasonableness of law, is the soul of The tight of the cast- u the law of iht Where iho foundation ia weak, tho atrcf.- ure falls." What is invalid frmn tlie begin- ning, cannot bi? in ide valid by length of [Noves. Of no less can be acknowledged, than thai her i at ihe bosom ot God, her voice the harmony of the world. All thiiics in li-aven and cavth to her hiimnge, the least of leeling- care and ihe cn-atcst as not exompivit tn.m her Ifookor. Th.ijc rights which and nature 1-5- tablished, and which are there culled KiTtkiL. RIGHTS, sucii as LIKE and LIUliRTV, iwd not the aid itt bitinau laws be more t-'fT-'Ctuallv vcatidl.N KVKItV MAN than they are, neither do t'uey receive any ndiiitinnal whra drehired by the munii ipal Uw.4 be inviolable. On the contrary, NO HUMAN I.KtilSLA- lancer In abriJgi or them, thi.' :.owner himself shall rnmum MIIIIO act- that aniinmts to a The law tliert-fore which supports SL.IVE- KY nuisjt iH'cesiarily be roiiil'-iited as cru, I, every of human Hdvocaio.-. Itbi'r- ty. Slavery is intrudm- -J human, wickedness, but advorates -rty, b; the tiu- lurc which lie has given to stone. TUo Itupcriul Decree. lliis pellaiibn of the should prevail against every The following is the lanjjingc of the L'ansulium adopted by the French S 'int.; reln- _ live to tho establishment of the Einpro, with that all men should do to y..'n, do ye so 'io of llis Kiiigil.nn. until, llmnigh prevule-nct-, Louis Napoloon us its bead them, for ibis is the law and the prophets." tho kingdoms of this world shall become ihe i "Art. I. The linp-.-rial dignity is re-rtlabli-h- Now, if we compare the pnu'.licc of enslaving' kingdoms of our Lord und of his Christ. Louis Napoleon JJonaparte is Kmp.Tor, uti- olden yc would j llie tendency of wiiicli is to obstruct the cumin, our men this rule, and. try it by this test, i: :s evident that ihe. verdict of conscience innst be Jf brought to bear tiipirjitsporiinj; view of this renovated .der the name of Napoleon ditinn of ;ho world, btihi'ld in vision by thu pruph- "Art. 2. Tlie Imperial dignity ia Itereditarr Jessie, wiiich slin'.l siond for nn ensin of ihe 1 alloiving our to.be by coi-slil-i people; to it shall iho (jentiles sack, and hi u- j orations interest or popularity. "Tiiim shaU nut I'ulUnv a niullitude to do evil; ncilher tliuti in a ranso to decline nfie-r many to wrest JLIntl und Olc J3ull. bo ylorin JJay it be our united engagement so to live in no male child, may adopt iho legitimate children, anil descendants iu the male line of the cf the Emperor Napoleon I. The of adoption are regulate.-! by a conformity with Ihe spirit of ihe In I after this adoption, ch.liren sho'ild bo 'aSiorin onr separate allotments, in thu cause born to L-iuis h'n chiidri- Jonny ami Ole !iavc prnvod thai music." hi-nv- c-nly is the twii.-sistar ol' clnriiy. .It'ii- ny has appropriated imi'i hundred and sixty tiiou- sand itollurs worth of her to the founding of schools for the education of girls in her nulive land, nnd Ole has become benefac- tor of his countrymen on u largo by pre- paring an inviting home for them in tnistaiid 'of ihe free, lie spent several months visiting va- rious portions of the United StalCB for ihe pur- pose of seluciini; a sile for an extensive Norwe- gian Colony, and riimlly secured by purchase tind otherwise; the control of between one nnd two hundred thousand acres of land L'cnn., siLi- ated about midway between the New York nnd Erie Railroad on the North, and the coulem- pletPU route of the Sutibnry nnd Erie Ruilroail on the South. The land is cood, and the climate one of the healthiest in the United Stales. It is his lo liave lite land divided cfF into small farms, and disposed of at prices anJ on terms so favorable thnt even- one cun become an '1'hat ull mankind are descendants of a corn-: onr Holy R.'Mleemnr, as to hast'rn Ihe c.imini' of! cannut be called succei-ti umii :i.'t.vr nion nticcstor; that "hiith mada of one this happy at ihfi solemn close j I'.s coijjn.s. tioiiin ,in r- bloOLi al. uati.ms of men to on ihe face of i when calk d to arcouru f-tr the occupancy ot the liictod ot L.OUIS anJ t-i the earth and that he is no ri-'i-peclur of persons i lulents corninittcil to us, wo may bj favored to llieir ure truths proniiiii-iiily set forth in Holy Writ receive the answer of "Well and and they appear to have barn fully recognised i faithful servant; thoii hast over a in the in which our form of govern- few things: 1 will mnke tlnx- ruler over many ment claims lo be aK mtfii are cri-n- cnler thoii i.'it.i of thy Ixird." Kiffncil in by ilireciiun vf the Ycarlii ttu in .Vt-io Vori, in ikz birth led and that they aro endowed with cer- lain inalienable ami liiat aniony these are, iife, liberty, and the pursiii; of happiness, llappv, indeed, would it have for our coun- try lim! these immutable principles been d inlo praclice. Ii appears striki-igly itiat onr tree form ol troviirmnent, and its ItbL-ral institiilinits, shouul bo linked wiih slavery and there is the plainest evidence ihat they do nol If we trace :o tin-ir source the dis- sensions which have disiurbod llie Iraiiipiihiy of onr government? and even threatoni-d its disso- lution, it will be obvious to nil ihat slavery has been ii source o! those IrutiblL-s. Amunyst liic measures la.tcrly ndnpled to al- i lay the excitcmeut, and remove the discij'iUMU ex- the RICHARD CARPENTER, cfert. Itacc or ItoU .lien In IVeviot-n Africa. iii Si'iytnltli' mlmlmble EXCELSIOU WASH-HOARD, wlikh.hy Inliigorihrklnd whu'h hiw but-n "irfrk'it ilu- public. Alwny-.nvf rjt- lo "wiml puvrcr" fi.ranv .irtnlhnllilii Circular Crimped Zinc limy have ufAlrlHnl.ftllitht- will luixfint Ihflr rupnUllon K ihv ofn world hiu vrt Connlrr MvrrhanlNfinit aupull- fthortnolict1, by cnllltiif ot Ihn I'lauk Kcml.on Ihi'Tulournph will nl fc Iron M wtiitMfttothorptncrsln the eltr LE8TCK fil'TLKR. 17 ltOIB'S mul P. M. KfON.City d. for Pulpit and t'aoill; ROOM. rnmi-hcil vllk nl, CiH-llta Lautlii, Prtlt-TT, FARINA FOR Pt'DDIJIGS. A VERY Dlowilcld, of i wo In1 siuinhlctl b.ickwnrds, and her old sun bonnet flopp.'J off, scnrring ihe horse nttached to the u'ogoii. lie I.tuherom'a bar- b- r pr.le, upset the loud of wood, half of which down Gumbo's cellar, striick one o: Gnmbn'scliildn non iho it for a lim.' -Mono HIH! s.) nlnrnu'd (jnm- thill shr dropped a stew pan ol" !MH, boiling ovsiers into the hip. instead of ihe dish, of a cus- tomer, who sat waiting for the savory eoncoc- linn, by a table in tin1 corner. Mrs. Gumbo rushi'd'l'or the customer for the door. Mrs Gumbo the child screamed, and the customer yelled "CJh, oh oh-oh-oh-h-h, my pcor cried j Mrs. Gumbo. Oh, murdcr-r-r 1 O, tny everlasting I'm to nil eternity r Murder-r-r roared the customer. The horse, the part of the wagon, some of the wood, were on their mad career. The owner of the strange do" came out of the store just in time la see Joe Tucker sine a rock to to demolish the invade, dog anJ nol waiting to nee Joe lei him aucii pop on the back, that poor Joe fell forty rods up the atreet, striking the loot of a Jong ladder, upon which Jim Eddcrbr was perched, paint pot in some .thirty feet from terra lad- der, Jim, UK! paint pot tprawllng to the earth crippling poor Jim for sprinkling blue paint copKHialy oftMhe brotdctbihi, Mttinetu and caliccs of Miller, t formal tod evcna ful f iiiznns. Such is 'he plan of benevolence to which Ole Bull is (tavoieil his time and energies; with great lie has alrcnclv conimenrei) a nnd csttibliiiboil quite a settlement of Norwegian iinmiijaiiis. On iho Sih ofSeptembiir the foand- tition of a New town, to be callod Oleona, was laid with due1 ceiemony, Ole himself presiding anil addressing in iivst eloquent terms his "Bruiher.s of Norway." Thceriectot his speecli was a'most inngi-.-al. The 'Norwegians, with bared hpnds raised to heaven, swore they would obey llie laws "f tlioir ad.ipu-d conn- do inmost to b.> worthy '.t pro- tection. The correspondent ol liie N. Y. Cutir- icr write? After silence was restored, Bull took his violin uid'Cnmmt-ncttd ai> inilh.'in suiiablu to the occasion. No language cun ibis music j audience, the attendant circumstances, and the occasion, appeared lo have a ni'tt- and unearthly inspiration to the preat he touched of every heart in his audi- ence. At times the Norwegians wept like child- ren, as the strains reminded them of kindred and friends far beyond the ocean, and then the strains of liberty would pour forth from the enchanted instrument. In a moment, the langaage of Ihe music, they would lonnd huzzas and chant in unison the war sougs and of liberty of old Norway. Aad dim wood rue, To UTBM Of Ml C'jmstanccs, the conteniplatiun of which humanity ihe discontent has not Art. -1. L N.ijiulcon by an or- gatvc d-cr..'i: ai.Mrc-sjd fi tiie X-jiut: an! [i.n'ted in tli1.1 archives, the urder cifsiicc'-x-iii'i) lo ihi; ihrine in the family. ca.-o tio sliould luavo no adoptive heir. "Art. 5. iu ot a or tidop.- ive heir oi L mis ISonapurte, anJ of ;ho .111. cessor- in a c.xl.iteral Ini wh-j nhah de- rive IK- ir in t.-ie -il I i ate by M n .-.ii-r.-, I'lrmod into a CmiM-ii of Uovrrinn'Mii. iiniteil to tho S.-n- iite nf the !i ,Jy, an-t cl ISinto. Micl submitit.'d to the i.f tlie 1 'pie, name-, Kur.ierur, aii.i r.'-mti.ilf.- li.t. family or.ier tnaielu the i'.x :hi.-i'.-n moment when Uio Thc for June con- tains a translation of Cherhon'iseilll, of Arabic at Coilstantinc, of ihe journey of :t traveller named via. Timbuelo lo the Mbuntain of the >Ioon. Tiiesc mountains, however, r.eeiir- to aefount do not lie ir. Middle, or rath- cr Kantem Afrir.i, as luiil down in d.'iu fint the Western land, which fill the 11 on space between the middle course of the Niger and i f :ire bv llie Ministers in the Atlantic Ocean. The route taken from .e mtl, tin'" r'lion 'the j ullj deliberate by a majutily o! barn, bultHv, Muika and Sakat. Thou folloiv.- the j easuinp paisa-e "beyond the circle of Sakat be- Ar'; members of the fatni.y or gins, so to speak, a m-w world the people have Napoleon called evciHiiai.y t red color, of whom a part are herdsmen, posses- tnc succession, and their descendants of b. tii f the new Kmper-r is l ?en alldyt'ii. But, we seriously ask, has I ing innumerable herds of' camels and of. sexes, from part of ihe Imperial family. A icit ail additional weight of acconntabilily in the sheep the rest arc. liusbnndmcn. One travels j niiius-cfintulluni regulates their position. Th'-y iume two months upon this territory, anil then j cannot inarrv without thu authorization of tho comes to the great Salt Lake, called Sebkat Schiin- Emperor. Their tnirria.'O without such amhor- aktha This Inkc looses itself in the of a I iz.tion j.-rivatioti of all hereditary right, dcwrt, ,n which one Hmls no Iruccs of, f coutraca U for vegetation. Across this desert, the passage ol which weeks, dwell a naiion of red sfenuant- color, living in tents mado of buffalo skins, and ing on dates and camel's milk Then comes sight of our (Juiniscucnt Judyjo, beirn incurred? Patrio'.ism in its purest form mav load us lo regard every country as nnr co'.mtry, every man as our brother, and may prompt fie desire- to promote the happiness of all, to enlighten the uninformed, to assist the lli-edy ami to relieve the oppressed and popular outbursts of this nature aro not But it belongs i a which can be crossed in fifteen j not contrary lo the prosei In In enhirirp and perfect this Jays after which oecur the first cases, which be-1 there can not be any mod RMiiiiiin sentiment, not al- long to thi- of the :Moon, anrl are inbab- cept in the forms and by one on the circumstances of a common Creator. or conimi'ii ancestry, bnt also upon Ihe iriteres- im" irulli, that all are alike objects of love of a common Redeemer, who gave himself ransom fnraU. lie has tnnglit us to regard him alone as onr master, and that we are brethren, desigu- id alike fora happy immortality, to be enjoyed in his holy presence. Then how can Chrisiians seize upon a porlion of their fellow-men, consign them to a state of bondage that is to end only with their lives, shut out in a large measure the light of knowledge from their understanding, and reduce them to a siate of chiuiels, to be bought and sold at the op- tion of tno matter: lima aerering.the tenderexi ties of human nature 1 [low can Chrisiianado ihU, and still stand approved ic tho sight of that Gricioua JJeuig whcee care sre open totliecriat ted by red men." Are these arcounts facts The journey as described, is loi enough to bring one to the Atlantic. INDEFF.NDEST JIakc wav for a hin- dependent in New Orl Art. 7. The Constitution of the Jan if maimaincd in all provisions which lo the present tSvnalui-cantitUunt; modification mads in it ei- tha means therein pre- iibed. "Art. 8. Tho following proposition ahail presented acceptance of Vie French peo- ple, in th-> f-.nns by iii; d-creon of Ihi -2.t an i of December. LS51 dependent voter said a man at u recent election wish for re-ontablishmentof th leans. ,nity in the person of Why, mv good the ckrk, It s rifliu in lii% direct .not an hour .mce you deposited your vote at this ,nd now said the voter, that very poll." I know it I i: was the Dcmocrtic tickft this 'ere is the Whig." But if you strive to rote twice, I shall have yon arrested." You will, will yon shouted the son of the creign people. Then I say if I'm denied the right -of lng the .hoi. right to tlmiiic in tb- 'e the order of th" iamily, as pnvij.-.l fo. by the An escharvge crmtnenlinp on the tin cmnstanei-thai a numbor o: t.'i: _____ ladies have recently Uyn married and Its a dirncd one-tided lo other says no city hai a b.nte nstf itake it til twttavd." I to ttw T" the Democrat., then aii't no   

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