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Sunday Advance: Sunday, June 15, 1884 - Page 1

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   Sunday Advance (Newspaper) - June 15, 1884, Green Bay, Wisconsin                               Vnr. TI GREEN BAY, Wis., SUNDAY, JUNE 15 1884 No, 21 Republican.Candidate For President. JAMES G. BLAINE. "WIT AND UUAIU1C. Schoolmasters sliould be entitled to rank tho ruling ciassas. Tlio modern dandy can truthfully exclaim: "I havcu'l the least The wiae cup is the father of sin: r.nd the whisky jug is the- step farther. A Connecticut man has invented a paper carpet. Oi course it will be read. The milk of human kindness, like '.Li quality of mercy, sho'ild ucver be strained. When a man's looks volumes, tho best thing he can do is to sell them for old junk. A paper chimney 50 feet high has been erected at Breslau, France. Com- posed of drawing paper, probably. Some people bang u door, while otner people adore a bang. Wo make it a point to lot nothing escape our obser- vation. Tho man who can keep tlic run of the ball games this season ought to be to superintend the next census. A lot of steel wire spring bods have i are tired of frying missionaries on forked sticks. Little Flaxen it's roin- Papa (somewhat annoyed by work in." let it rain. Little yi.-ixeii Hair was going to, soiisfin is unon tis, and the greatest ambition of the average voung man is to have some one invent a pair of pants the color of custard pie. Some men are born great, some achieve creatness, and some write 12.- words on r. postal card, ;md grasp fame right by. the back of "Some dnv in the uonce i nope to be says Kate field. J5tit Kate is it very oupci'Uii' Yonr cvdi- iuuy Vv'oiiii'iu >j r.r.liclicil to be iue-uroani-uiivled in the now. A Kentucky girl treated a gray-hair- ed tramp kindly and iio has died and left her a snug fortune. Sonic tramp, disguised a.s a gentleman, will now probably want to marry her. The following advertisement appears in a Wisconsin paper, medium-sized house for man and wife r.s near uov' a? possible." Tin's is a delicate way of fnforming the public that this couple haven't been married long. A thieving young Pittsburg dentist has eloped with the daughter of a Philadelphia nabob, and all the laugh- ing-gns ever used by the new son-iti- Whc-n n. hen pets on for a fhort time she but when she retires for a couple of weeks she A hen is nothing if not uur pramma'ieai. A V. turns out sets of human teeth per day for the low priuo of per set. At this rate the praises of Utica should be ju tvervbudv's smile on the old gentleman's counten- ance. It is not pleasant, after you been repeating in your best voice sev- eral operatic gems, to have your friend look up with a wearied countenance and ask you "if yon hadn't just us lief sing1 as tic that, you 'Transcript. woman said luaxueld Beau to a young man at a party the other night; "she talks me to death." said the young "I will inform you that the woman you speak of is nay Miss TriUiloo nsk'ed at the msisii-aie. "Well, not replied the old man, "but I come pretty near being musical. I just shave the notes." :-.nd little Miss Triililoo thought he was a JJuiKkeyc. Mnskegon, Mich., justly claims pre- eminence as the greatest lumber-pro- produet of Muskcgon. during feel. exceed the product of the iSaginsiv Valley by several Jiun- dred millions. Sim produced during the srtrnc period laths, ami the vessel ot LaKc .Mieiugan is transacted at Muskegon, over 8. vessels Were cleared from t'ne port iiist ______ The Republican Candidates. In this issue, the SUNDAY ADVANCE presents its renders with portraits of the Republican Candidates for President aud Vice-Prrsident. JAMES OILLESPIE BLAINE was born January 01, 1800, in Union Township. Washington County, Peun, lie came of Scotch-Irish stock. His father was much respected m the com- munity, and married a Jliss Gilk-spie, a devout Catholic. The issue of this James was the second of these all of whom embraced the religion ot their father, Presbylerianism. Out of regard for his mother, he steadily refrained from giving public expression of his religious convictions. He entered Washington College in 1843, at the age of 13, iind graduated with honors in 1847, going immediately to Blue Lick Springs, Ky., where he became professor in the Western Military Insti- tute. He hero made the acquaintance of a Miss Staudwood, who kept a young laches' school, and whom he subsequently married. After teaching a few years, he entered upon the. study of law, and was admitted to the bar. In 1833, with his young wife, who WHS a native- of Maine, lie removed to Augustu, iu that slate, which has ever since been tiieir home. After a brief practice" at the bar, he entered the journalistic field iu which he continued His active political career began with his election to ttio siaie ieyishuui'e in j 1838. serving two years in the lower House, lie was eleeied lu Cunyruhs in 1862, and successively reelectert to liotu i brandies. He was speaker iu the 41st, 4.2d, and 43d Congresses. He was a prominent candidate for tin; Presidential nomination before the Republican Con- ventions of 1876-80, and was Secretary of State for a brief ueriod in President Gar- field's Cabinet. Mr. Elaine is now 54 years of age, of vigorous health) and iu tuu pi hue uf Lis mental powers. OKN. JOHN A. I.OOAN was born in Murfreesboro, Jackson County, 111. At the breaking out of the Mexican war, he enlisted as a private in the First Illinois Regiment, and through merit rose to the rank of lieutenant. At the conclusion of the war, he read law with his uncle, Lieut. Governor A. M. Jenkins. After a brief service as clerk of the County Court ot Jackson county, to which he was elected in 1849, he resigned and entered the law school of the Uni- versity of Kentucky, from which lie practice of the law. His nrtive pMHirni career began in 1832, when he was elected to the state legislature. In 1803. lie was appointed State's Attorney, which office he held until 183G, when he was re-elected to the Legislature, and in the same year was elected to Congress, and continued with that body uutil the Outbreak of the Rebellion, when he resigned and entered the Union Army as u private, being en- gaged iJiu first, battle of Bull linn. Hi-j served with distinction throughout the war, andro.se in iuu milk of major gen- eral. Ho entered Congress again as I thret terms, when he ek-Cied 10 the S. .-fcrviiig with; this body until li'77. After a brief :n fif his Oi iiiW j Republican Candidate For Vice-president. JOHN A. LOGAN. Any t.imp ilnriiiir ttw wur. aftfiv thn beginuing of MS i.'i. if, wouM liavt; bucu hard to fliul u. in the iiold nniuboriug its full coiiijiloment of men. There were many having a strength of not more than, JiiHI or particularly on the C'onfo {orate .side. In various severe encounters regiments were decimated, Mid in some canes lo.st half their strength, but it was rarely that a body was so completely wiped out Uiht lucre v.as nothing to rally on. At the battle of Pleasant Hills, La., a Texas cavalry regiment, numbering ii48 men, were seen forming for n charge against a federal brigade of infantry. The latter had good cover and were fresh. The cavalry had to dash across a field to reach the line, and before I brigade paaied along behind his two lines and ordered the men to hold their lire until the word wu.s givvn. Lui-h pair were instructed to tire at one ruther, oue ut the Hum and the other ut the horse. The cavalry made the charge in one line, it ivus shonor I bun tbo front of the brigade tlmfc three tires clari'd ho wo ill go to tlio piace whore uis ptiucil iuil. Vi'iL'u lli.i-ii ut lour spiral swcfiji.s inmii; 11 jitu ul IHM uiiip. What piiu'i! do SDH suppuMi: il, was? I shun t toll; but it wus u now town, iind bo cleared last yoiii', which by no mu.iiia bad to do uudef his first .s fodti'utcs t-amu forivurd with n dnBh and a yoll, keeping pretty even front until they were within 1W feet of the when all the muskets rang out together. One volley was enough. That regiment was so nearly blotted oil' the face of tho fc.rtii that only four of iiw iiKMibers tuvaed to the l.'onfe.deniU: lit 0 horses were kille.l outright, and nt least JUf) wounded. There wore not ten wounded men to jjick up. Kvery Fed- eral had 11 dcii-1 aim I'.ud a close target, A Voiins Atturiicy'ii I.uck. V n: Ingenuity euu soiurtimfts chain luek liricrivctoci Triliinie. The short clay pipo formerly used by smokers !ms of luti; ynnru been to a great extent supplanted by the woo.ten pipu, tbo manufacture of which now uu importaiit industry. Home iuf urina- tion respecting these pipes is given in British Consul Isiglis tnuhis report on Leghorn, whenru the material for in.'ik- wooden pipes in now largely ex- ported. Selected roots of the heath are collected on thu hills of the Alarenima, where the plant grows luxuriantly and atttihis a treat hen brought to factory the roots are cleared of earth, and any decayed parts are cut aniiv. Thoy arc then shaped into blocks of various dimensions with a cir- cular saw set iu motion by ti small Htcam oiigine. (ireat dovterity is necessary at this Stlige UL CliCUJlg Hit', llitl uilvaiitagt1, and it is only ul'tei1 a long apprenticeship that a workman, is thnr- onghly oiliuient. The blocks nre thru placed in a vat and mibjected to a gen- tle simmering for u spaci' of twelve iJui-iug tlio process tliey nc- !inj.r lion. Uichard his term cxjiiring on the Oth March To wit. knnw :i youny utt.i.inioy who two his :.iith a i rum tliO l.tH-' tin; :--.ti'l J'O would gi'.'i! N" o'ii-- niong to tmti niMpunMuiiivj, goi-lvil to Mind luck. Tyinrr !iis iiasnt- kerchief over ha stool up be- I uiu.li> t-.f the ruiie-'i and dc- whieh the best arc noted, and ara then in a condition to receive the iinal turning; but this is douo eisewiiere. The rougji blocks avo pdelud in from forty to Inn sent abroad, to Irnin-d (St. Cloud, where they into tho famous  ves to look ;'.t. if iire lint Vnill' iicai I i-..: not be. One e.in guess tha oharactri a man by tho kind of pictorial he cluisos.   

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