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Green Bay Republican: Saturday, September 17, 1842 - Page 1

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   Green Bay Republican (Newspaper) - September 17, 1842, Green Bay, Wisconsin                               IS TIIS FiPBI TIB IAW8, 1KSILTE8, IND PUBLIC TBEATIES 9V THE UNITED STATES, AEB PUBLISHED BY AUTHOBITT. HENRY O. SHOLES, PUBLISHER. GREEiN BAY, W. T. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1842. VOLUME 1. NO. 51. TERMS OF THE dfreejn Bay Republican. The Green Bay Republican is published every Saturday at Tmo Dollars and _fifty ctntt per ftnndm if paid in advance illicit, three dollirs Will be charged after the first six months. dollar per square (12 lines of for the first insculon; and fur every subsequent insertion tteettty-jRve cents ad- ditional per Those sent without a spe- cification in regard to time will be published until forbid, and charged accordingly. Merchants by the year will be charged S'20 00, arid each not permitted to occupy ovci half a column tit any one time. FrotH'ional cards will be published at the rate of SIO per annum. No subscriptions received for a less term than six months, and no paper will be discon- tinued until all arrearage-'1 fro paid be optional with the publisher. Letters on business, and communications addressed to the Editor, must be POST otherwise they will receive no attention [PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY.] Laws of the United States sf-K at nit Min iun uj tun XHii 39] AN ACT making appropriations for the naval sci vice fnr the year one thousand eight hun- dred and forty-two. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the following sums be appropriated, in addition to the unexpended balances of former appropriations, out of any unap- propriated money in the Treasury, for the naval service for the year one thou- sand eight hundred and forty-two, viz: No. 1. For pay of commission, war- rant, and petty officers and seamen, two million three hundred and thirty-five thousand dollars- Provided, That till otherwise ordered by Congress the offi- cers of the navy shall not be increased beyond the number in the respective trades that were in the service on the rst day of January, eighteen hundred and forty-two, nor shall there be any further appointment of midshipmen un- til the number in the service be reduced to the number that were in service on the first day of January, eighteen hun- dred and forty one, beyond which they shall not be increased until the further No. 2, For pay of superintendents, na- val and all the civil estab- ot flip eight thousand four hundred and twen- ty dollars. .Nu. JL' or seven, liuuurcu and twenty thousands dollars. No. 4. For medicines and surgical in- struments, hospital stores, and other ex- penses ou account of the sick, thirty thousand dollars. No. 5. For increase, repair, arma- ment, and equipment of the navy, and wear and tear of vessels in commission. two million dollars. No.G. For ordnance and ordnance stores on the Northern lakes, fifty-nine thou- sand and niuety-seveu. dollars, No. 7. For improvement and necessa- ry repairs of the navy yard at Ports- mouth, New Hampshire, forty-seven thousand four hundred and twenty-five dollars. No. 8. For improvement and necessa- ry repairs of the navy yard at Charles- town, Massachusetts, twenty-nine thou- sand dollars. No. 9. For improvement and necessa- ry repairs of the navy yard at Brooklyn, New York, one hundred and twenty nine thousand one hundred dollars: Pro- vided, That no part of this or any former appropriation to that object shall be ap- plied to the. construction of a dry dock at Brooklyn, except in payment for mater- ials previously contracted for and yet to be delivered, until a suitable place shall No. 13. For improvement and necess- ary repairs of the navy yard near Pensa- cola, Florida, and for a naval construc- tor at said place, thirty-five thousand three hundred dollars. No. 14. For necessary repairs of the hospital building and its dependencies at Charlestown, Massachusetts, three thou- sand nine hundred and sixty dollars. No. 15. For finishing coppering the roof of the hospital building at Brooklyn, New York, fifteen hundred dollars. No. 16. For necessary repairs of the hospital building and its dependencies at Norfolk, Virginia, thirteen thousand seven hundred aud fifty dollars. No. 17. For building an ice-house and privies at the hospital at Pensacola, two thousand dollars. No. 18. For necessary repairs of the Philadelphia naval asylum, one thou- sand three hundred dollars. No. 19. For defraying the expenses IV... tVAlu .1 jug, poses, viz. For freight and transportation of materials and stores of every descrip- tion; for wharfage and dockage; storage and rent; travelling expenses of officers and transportation of seamen; house rent to pursers, when duly authorized; for funeral expenses; for commissions, clerk hire, office rent, stationery, and fuel to navy agents; for premiums and incidental expenses of recruiting; for ap- prehending deserters; for compensation to judge advocates; for per diem allow- ance to persons attending courts martial arid courts of inquiry, or other services authorized by law; for printing and stationery of every description, and for working the lithographic press; for books, maps, charts, ra athematical and nauti- cal instruments, chronometers, models, and drawings; for the purchase and re- pair of fire engines and machinery; for the repair of steam engines in navy yards, for the purchase and maintenance of ox- en and horses, and for carts, timber wheels and workmen's tools of every de- scription, for postage of letters on public service; for pilotage and towing ships of war; lor taxes and assessments tin pub- lic property; for assisstance rendered to vessels in distress; for incidental labor at not annlicable to anv other appropriation; for coal and other luci. and for candles and oil for the use of na- vy yards aud shore stations, and for no other object or purpose whatever, four hundred and fifty thousand dollars. No. 20. For contingent expenses for objects not hereinbefore enumerated, three thousand dollars. No. 21. For the charter of steamers Splendid and Clarion, in September and October, eighteen hundred and for- ty-one for the survey of Nantucket Shoal, four thousand three hundred and forty-five dollars and thirty nine cents. No. 22. For carrying into cfiect the acts for the suppression of the slave trade, including the support of recaptured Afri- cans, and their removal to Africa, under authority of said acts, including an un- expended balance of former appropria- tions carried to the surplus fund, ten thousand five hundred and forty-throe dollars and forty-two No. 23. For the transportation, ar- rangement, and preservation of articles brought by the exploring expedition, ftTTrn-t niinnnd nnl IT necessary. MARINE CORPS. No. 21. For pay of officers, non com- missioned officers, musicians privates, and servants, serving on shore, and sub- sistence of officers of the marine corps, one hundred and eighty-three thousand three hundred and eighty-one dollars. No. 25 For provisions for the non- commissioned officers, musicians, pu- and the title to the land obtained, and a plan and estimate of the cost made, un- der the direction of the Secretary of the Jfavy, and approved by him and the President: And provided, also, That the Secretary of the Navy may, in his dis- ti-etion, apply the sum of one hundred thousand uCllars of the amount hereby appropriated, and any balance of former appropriations for the construction of a dry dock at Brooklyn, New York, to the construction of a floating dock at the same place; and if any part of this ap- propriation shall be expended upon the construction of a floating dock, as here- by authorized, the construction of the dry dock shall be suspended until the further order of No. 10. For improvement and necess- ary repairs of the navy yard at Philadel- phia, Pennsylvania, one thousand six hundred dollars. No. 11. For improvement and necess- ary repairs of the navy yard at Wash- District of Columbia, fifteen i i i Utuuvauu inlet) iiuuuii'tt No. 12 For improvement stnd necess- ary repairs of the navy yard at Gosport, Virginia, fifty-six eight hun- dred dollars. where there are no public quarters as- signed; per diem allowance to enlisted men on constant labor; expenses of bury- ing deceased marines; ry, forage, on public letters; ex- penses in pursuit of deserters; candles and oil, straw, barrack furniture, bed sacks, spades, axes, shovels, picks, car- penters' tools, and for keeping a horse for the messenger, seventeen thousand nine hundred and eighty dollars. J01JN WHITE, Speaker of the House of Rfpresaitatitcs. WILLIE P. MAKGUM, Picsiilcnt of the Senate pro (import. Approved, August -1. 1849. JOHN TYLER. Miscellaneous. SlAGULAE. BUT TliUE PoW- EK. OF following anec- dote was told on a trial lately by a dis- tinguished French A f'li'lo s.icrtr.v nf -flm TTivirr of in took under her protection a young lady of family, placed her at a boarding school, and received her frequ- ently on holidays at her own apartments in the palace. Suddenly the protege an- nounced to the school-mistiess and her intimate friends, that she was about to be married, under the auspices of her patroness, to a young Lieutenant Colon- el, to whom she had been introduced by her Royal Highness, and in evidence of the truth of her assertions, produced let- ters on the subject, with the seal of the Pi iuccss, and in a hand-writing which all acquainted with that of Madame Adelaide believed to be hers. Subse- quent letters were also displayed, in which her Royal Highness was made to state, first, that the intended husband was detained away by his regimental that he was dangerously ill, and ultimately that he was dead and buried. The young lady then gave her- self up to such violent grief, that fears were entertained for her own life. The only consolation she would listen to, was the permission to put herself in the mourning of a widow, and go to weep over the tomb of her first lover. The un- der governess accompanied her to the cernctry of Pere la Chaise, and at the OLl I'lli, the place of interment of Lieut. Count a year before at the r.go of twenty From the ft. 0. Picayune. Sports of the Field. Fun on the a Ca- tastrophe, MOBILE, August 9, 1642. Dear room for the follow- ing bit of fun and oblige half a dozen of us here. A rare and unusual piece of hunting sport came off near town the other day. Two young sportsmen were returning on horseback to the city after enjoying a hunting excursion to one of the watering places, when they observed in the read a small and beautifully formed animal, marked black and white, with a fine bushy tail. One immediately pronoun- ced it a black squirrel, while the other as confidently swore it was a coon, both agreeing, however, that it was exceed- ingly handsome: and as it seemed re- markably quite indiffer- ent about leaving the both lin'tVi fl-vrs i f A tn catch it. One picked up a forked stick, and commenced a cautious doubling and winding, m order to get near and pin the Hack squirrel to the ground. He remarked that he was anxious to secure the beautiful little animal alive, as be- ing so tame, he thought it would make a novel and interesting pet for a lath'. At this point the interest of the sport became quite high and peculiarly exci- ting; indeed, for novelty no incident like it may be found among the annals of the sporting world. Our hero was soon near enough to strike, and with an ad- mirably well directed blow lie pinned his prey to the ground with the forked stick. Whew is it In the name of horror.' what came otto of Now, if the quality of game is to be judged through the medium of the ol- factories, we are confident here would have been pvritoment for tlxo g nomical organs of a ban vivant such as may not be found every day. The way those two sportsmen ran, and the way the odors strongly opposite to those of "Araby the or of The sweet South _l are still clinging around them, must be in every way curious to mcntic'J! The- serving on shore, forty-five thousand fifty-four dollars and ninety-nine cents. No. 26. For clothing, forty-three thou- sand six hundred sixty-two dollars and fifty cents. No. 27. For fuel, sixteen thousand two hundred seventy-four dollars and twelve cents. No. 2 si. For keeping barracks in repair, and for rent of temporary barracks at New York, six thousand dollars. No. 29. For transportation of officers, non-commissioned officers musicians, and privates, and expense of recruiting, eight thousand dollars. No. 30. For medicines, hospital sup- plies, surgical instruments, pay of mat- ron and hospital stewards, four thou- sand one hundred and lorty dollars. i No. 31. For military stores, pay of ar- morers, keeping arms in repair, accou- trements, ordnance stores, flags, drums, fifes, and other instruments, two thou- iund eight hundred dollars. No. 32. For contingent expenses of! toll, wharfage, and cartage; for per, diem allowance for attending courts.', 1 and courts of inquiry; conipeu-1 to judge advocates, house rent. ter, and then assured the inquirers that it did not contain the entry oi any such burial, which consequently iiuisi.hebukl, have taken placo elscwLcio. This an- swer inci cased the despair of the young lady, who picvailed upon the attendant to lici totlic cciiielricsof Piiiih, at eaoh of which they met with the- like disappointmcnt. It was night before they returned home, and the stricken pup'il retired to rest in deeper despair than ever. The governess, the next clay, felt it to be her duty to go to Madame Adalaide and relate all these mournful circumstances, taking with her the let- ters announcing the events which had so entirely destroyed the peace of her pupil The astonishment of the Princess on hearing the extraordinary narrative, and at secing letters apparently in her own hand-writing, but which she had never written, and recognizing impres- sions from a seal which did really be- long to her, could not be described. No such person as Lieutenant Count M. was known to her Pvoyal Highness, con- sequently she never could have contem- plated any such alliance for her pupil, or announced to her his illness or death. In fact, the young lady had been induced by a morbid" imagination, to invent the whole purloin one of her patro- ness's seals, imitate her hand-wnting, compose the fictitous letters, and by unuiug an OKI am, muuee nei to pin them into the Her mind, however. was affected with the same grief, from her own deliberate invention, as if all the circumstances had really existed. A gentleman havingahorsethat start- ed and broke his wife's neck, a neighbor lokl him he wished to purchase it for liis wife to iidc said tic other- intend to marry again, myself" A country editor says he has received the following "stop my Dear have looked carefully over yotir paper for six months, for the some individual I was acquain- ted with, but yet not a single soul I cnro any thins: having dropt off, you will nave my name erased the creature was neither a coon nor a ZIP. OLDCN In looking over an old history of New England, we find on turning to the appendix, an abridgement of the laws and ordinances of olden time We make a few extracts, for the curiosi- ty of our readers. Apparel. All persons not worth two hundred pounds, wearing gold or silver lace, or buttons, or bone lace, above two shillings a yard, or silk hoods, or scarfs, may be presented by the grand jury, and shall pay ten shilling? for every offence. Children. All parents to teach their children to read, and all masters to ac- quaint their families with the capital laws, on penalty of twenty shillings, and to catechise them once a week. It is death for any child, above 16 years of age, to strike or curse his parents, unless provoked by extreme correction, or in A man in vicinity once sent n barrel of er.iiibeiric.-- to a friend m for- ciuii pnitb, v. lui had never seen any fruit of the kind In a low months he re- ceived a letter, in which his friend cx- 1 hot mi the length of tin: the fruit wort1 sour they arrived, ami he wa- obliged to thiow tuem Ccvrttt A STRANGE learn that on Saturday evening as one of the clerks in our Post Office was opening a Savannah mail bag, he discovered in it a live garter snake, about a foot long We do not know whether he was mark- ed post paid, or sun. I AM ON lawyer not ovei- young nor handsome, in examining a attempt? to confuse her. and thus to ren- der her testimony contradictory and nn- availing. She however seemed to be calm, and proof against all frivolous questions put to her. At last, "Miss, upon my word you are very pretty." The young lady very promptly replied: would return the compliment. str if j I were not on oath may be sup- posed, the lawyer questioned her no farther. Xo very romantic young la- dy rescued from drowning while in a i state of insensibility on revi- ving that she must and would marry the 1 noble preserver of her life. On enqui- ring the name, of her generous deliverer, to her crcat dismay MIU learneti it was !a DOS' Pompey was altogether opposed lo the amalgamation Swk's Union. "flroTirc Washington Napoleon Jack- 1 son Hannibal Harrioon r' Ma'am i -Tell Josephine Pu'siua Cleopatra Matilda K'toiittjUi bring up the i 'pail'1 I ma am, The Advent of Azrael. Azrael, the Angel of Death, sat in si- lence upon his gloomy throne, shrouded in a veil of mist, sad. cheerless and de- sponding The revelry that once filled hisdreary hallshad passed away. Beau- ty and youth no longer attended his le- vee, the aged and infirm alone peopled his dominions. The cries of widows and orphans were heard no more; and the music of their shrieks had ceased to regale his ears. Azrael was troubled and enraged. He saw that the number of his visitants had greatly decreased, and none of his attendants could divine the cause. He brooded over it some days, but could not satisfy himself by any theory he assumed, or any process of reasoning he adopted. A darker frown gathered upon his awful brow, a deeper shade settled upon his terrible countenance that never relaxed into a smile, but when some leil disease was depopulating the earth and peopling his realm, such as the cholera or the plague. His mightiest exertions had been put forth, his most successful ministers nad been commissioned to destroy, and yet but little addition had been made to the number of his subjects. Fever returned lo him in a rage at his unsuccessful ex- ertions, and his prime minister, consump- tion, came back, pallid with disappoint- ment. Influenza had lost his influence, and the ague could shake no one but himself. Azrael felt that his skill was baffled, that his ingenuity was completely foiled that his power was curbed and confined by some potent charm, some powerful opponent, such as the world had never before witnessed, such as he had never before hud to contend with. Ho determined to visit the earth, to concentrate his energies, and make another and a mightier effort to regain the power lip ln-3 Culling around him the most distinguished of his coun- sellors he imparted to them his design, and commanded their assistance. Then unfolding his heavy wings he rose from his throne and flew to the earth, with a long train of attendants. The ravages nf niconco etill tnTin but their evidences were nearly oblite- rated. New attempts were constantly made by his ministers under his direc- tion, but failed in almost every instance. He inquired into the causes of his bad success and traced them in every to the laboratoiy of Bristol, whose potent medicines were proof against the subtlest of his contrivances, and the combined energies of his attendants. lie saw a beautiful young woman res- cued from the grasp of consumption, when he thought her already his own, and he beheld his favorite, influenza overcome in a fair struggle. Dyspepsia fared no better, and the ague was com- pletely powerless. A free use of the Extract of Parsaparilla had secured the inhabitants from all kinds of diseases. Azrael accused his attendants of cow- ardice and stimulated them to new ef- forts. They collected all their energies ana renewed the attack, but they were in most instances repulsed with ease, and though in some cases the contest was more protracted, it was seldom 1 nrcl ITI (be end tTifv riably discomfited. Old and young, male and female, rich and poor were alike protected from their assaults by this in- valuable remedy, and Azrael was obliged to abandon the struggle, and rally his scattered forces for a retreat to his own dominions. Consumption had worked himself to a skeleton, influenza had wheezed him- self hoarse, and the ague had shook him- solf into fits m his service, and vet noth- ing had been eliecteu, iiosy cheeks and jobust foims met his eye wherever he gazed. To his indescribable horror he heard that the same powerful medi- cine was, extending its sway to the most distant parts of the valley of the Missis- sippi, and that wherever it went, his emissaries were expelled the country, and Ins Influence destroyed. Sad tales were told him of Tonawanda and Mau- mee, and he became convinced that ho had not a foot-hold en the continent, in any place but an uninhabited swamp in Florida. lie shook hisj head with rage, seized an infirm old man, who had al- ready out-lived the usual term of life, and who had been upheld by the same charm that had so thwarted all his pro- -ii-rnittrl Int- 1 -r fi ff orv 111 i lucks of the old patriarch, and flew away with him, to his own dark domain, hav- ing first, however, dispatched a messen- ger to Bristol's for a half dozen of tip Extract Sarsapanlla, which he inten-i iled to proMjnt tu his old friend Pluto whu Lad 1-eui foi a long tiruo afflicted with a chronic dyspepsia. HnsU.l s Kxtiiutof Sarsaparilla can. U- ptuTiiUM-il m place the sign pf   

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