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Wisconsin Valley Leader Newspaper Archive: July 12, 1906 - Page 1

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Publication: Wisconsin Valley Leader

Location: Grand Rapids, Wisconsin

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   Wisconsin Valley Leader (Newspaper) - July 12, 1906, Grand Rapids, Wisconsin                             ;1.SO PER YEAR GRAND RAPIDS, WISCONSIN. THURSDAY. JULY 12, 1906. VOL. V. NUMBER 20 BUSY AT PORT EBWABDS. One Hundred 25 Men at Work on the New Mill. These, are at Port. Edwards. For the" past'week'or two, many teams have been Kept busy, shoveling and scraping out the foundations and now the "concrete and brick workmen' are busy; constructing, the lower walls anc concrete floors.'; At least 125' men will be employed this week on this construe and that number or more will be; employed until the buildings are enclosed, which will probably take until late in the fall. The mam building is 130x300 feet in dimensions. Besides there will be two wings, one 24x60 feet, the: other about ,30 feet square. The) wiiKall be constructed of brick anc cement.. Billy: Ule has, charge oft the construction work; .while Ernest Eich stead and Einlle Garrison aub-boses and according to Ernest, their days and nights are full of trouble in .eonsquence. Thfe Wisconsin Central road has put on a special ;.train ..to transport the men1 to and frorn1'their work at the PorttoGrafid Rapids vrith a fare of 10 cents round trip; The train leaves Grand Rapids In ;the morning at and re" turning leaves Port Edwards at p. m When the mill Is ,in will give steady employmeut to 150' men, or between two or three, hundred men at the conblned Port Edwards plants.' Notice to Bog Owners. State of "Wisconsin 88.Vdity of 'Grand .Kapids. Noticels hereby given thatjtlfo dag license for the year is now due and office of the city clerk. V If not-paid ori or before, thef day of July, 1906, owners of dogs on which license Is not paid, will be liable to arrest under ordinance No. 53 of the city of Grand Kapids. Dated at the, office of the city clerk this first day of June, 1906. C. E. BOLES, City. Clerk. pocket books containing a sum of money and promissory notes. Finder leave this office and re- ceive reward. Banking Made Plain Wehavefdpcitfed'toruri a series ,of adi vertisement8..underthe. above head feel- ing that they will be of interest to all. The first will be HOW TO DEPOSIT IN OPEN ACCOUNT Deposits made check are called "open accounts." The depositor: receives a little book called a or "bank book" with the amount de- posited entered therein and each deposit thereafter is entered in rthis .book. book is, the depositor's .'receipt for" the money and is furnished by us without charge. Nothing should be written, in it except by an officer of the bank. (Making out deposit tickets next week) The First National Bank Grand Rapids Wisconsin BOOKS and LiECflb BLANKS t FOR SALE AT LEADER OFFICE School Order books, 100 in Town Order books, 100m book....... 50c: 50e! New Machine Shop, f The newly remodeled ma- s chine shop of Geo. F. Krie- v ger Co. is now thoroughly equipped to dp all kinds of machinery repairing', in- cluding the making of new parts. in- v Traction Engine Repairing A Specialty Work quickly done and sa- tisfaction gauranteed. We make patterns and do high- class machine work. Give us your patronage. 6EO, F, KRIE6ER CO, GimndR.apldto.Wta. ATTEMPTED SUICIDE. Ida Daiejr a High Strung Ypoag Lady, Tries the JjMuUnnm Sunday afternoon there quite; a bit of excitement among the neighbors of the Fourth ward over the attempted suicide of Mies Ida a pretty girl of aboutlS years of agei Ida's parents had gone on a visit to their former home at Hancock and Saturday night, she was enjoying the nice summer evening enter- taining her friend, Charlie either porch or in the yard just outside the house. When it began to get a little late her brother, Will, with whom she was staying during her parents' absence, insisted on her'cutting short her lover's stay and for her to take the more prosaic course of going to bed. Miss, Davey took the. interference on .the part of her brother greatly to heart and Sunday sought to put a quietus upon her troubles by swallow- ing two ounces of .laudanum, which she proceeded to do in a verj tragic manner in the presence of her family. Dr. Rockwell wSs called as soon as 'possible and with tne aid of a stomach pump, he relieved the young lady of part of the dope but recommended that she be kept walking asvSbe was by no means out.of danger. .Charlie Johnson' gallantly Volunteered to keep her awake and they spent the greater part of the night walking! 7; Base Ball Notice. I beg to notify the citizens of 'Grand Rapids, who have subscribed for {he purpose or organizing and maintaining a base ball club (or this'season, that the money that is being'collected by Mr. rijiBe iiis all been turned over to me and I have used the same for the pur-' pose of organizing and maintaining a base ball team. At my solicitation and the solicitation of others, George Davi consented to act as manager, but owidg to the fact that he could not devote any time to the management or the, organiza- tion of .the team it waa necessary for some one to go'ahead and attend to It. All bills that are contracted in conHec-; tion base -'ball team will be paid, and any one desiring to examine the records of the receipts and diBturb- ments may time by -calling at my office. I wish to those who have so kindly subscribed, and I feel confident that we have a ball team that will be able to play any amateur ball teanv.in the state and make a creditable sfiowlngT It is almost impossible to succeed with any city.matter unless rthe citizens will jive-their; support in-' and ;he team is experiencing considerable difficult} with'lack of this moral support from-a great If we deBire.a good team and a "team that will piay with snap and vigor we must give the team our support. It is a very poor policy to object and kick and knock and at the same time not 'contribute1 anything to- ward the support of. the team. In fact such a spirit would discourage almost any one. We intend to have some good games during the balance of the season and our schedule, at the present time is as follows: _ Sunday, July 15th we will play Merrill at Merrill; Sunday, July !2nd we will play Merrill at Grand Rapids; on Sunday, July 29th we will play Stevens Point at Grand Rapids; on Sunday, August 5th we will play Berlin at Grand Kapids; on Sunday, August 12th we will play Waupaca at Waupaca. These teams are as good amateur teams as we can get without an unusual ex- pense and we hope they will all be good games. The team experienced considerable difficulty in getting organized by reason of the neglect of the management to take any active interest in attempting' to organize the ball team, but we hare at ast secured a good line up and 'have established a reputation so that with some support, from us they will be able to play good ball. (Signed) W.E. WHEEI.AN; Catches a Minnow. In a letter from Father Blakeslee, who has been spending a couple of weeks fishing at Lac du Flambeau, he says he landed a "minnow" on Tuesday known n that country as a "m'uskey." It measured 43 Inches In length, 22 Inches n girth and weighed pounds, one of the record catches In that country of big fish. We want to extend congratu- atipns and doff our hat to a real fisher- man. Going to Build This Tear t Do you want your building to ,be lightly, frost proof and permanent? Then pur pressed concrete building blocks will Interest you. You'll like tke price. Grand Kapidi Hollow Con- crete Wall Co. Hill ft. [i wlllnf Adami Standard Smoking to- bacco for 26c per pound. NOBTHWEST COLLEGIATE IN8TI- TUTE. A Write-up of the Sen School at Sherry. (BrRev.T. Walter Malctlm.) The people of central Wisconsin are rejoicing over the establishment of the Northwest Collegiate Institute at Sherry. For some time past the need of a Christian college In this section, having a population of over half a million, has been apparent and now the hope long entertained has at 'last been realized. The founder is the Hev. William J. Agnew, a man of wonderful executive ability, who since, going out from Mc- Corineck Seminary In 1901, through his untiring energy, self-sacrificing devotion and tactful resources has won distinction upon the home mission field in Wisconsin, having built and dedicated two handsome church edifices within three years, one atSherry and the other at Arpm six miles from that place. He was called from this work by an academy in the southern part of the state to become .its field secretary and served in this capacity fof.two years with marked success. In this new enterprise Rev. Agnew has the confidence and support of the friends of Christian education and men of means, and with him as Its executive head the the future of- the school is assured. Rev. Agnew is the secretary and general manager. The .Rev. Prof. R M. Smith, has been chosen principal. Prof. Smith is a graduate of Hastings college, a' post- graduate of Princeton University and. a graduate of Princeton. Seminary. His experience aa a president of a Semilar institution in southern Wisconsin, where be was eminently successful, places the teaching staff under a wise, and com- petent head. The plan upon which the Northwest Collegiate Institute is founded is most unique. It has been well said, that to mak.e a success, get the Idea of a school different from any other and meeting a need supplied'by no other: That-tells quite ,truely just this school starts out to accomplish, and In so doing it has the solution of the problem "the right kind of a college." The location Is ideal. Here in 'the mlds't of a population of over half a million, with no college, Christian or otherwise, North west Collegiate Institute takes it place, while in the southern part of the state there are no less tnan thirteen institutions of learning. Sherry is practically the geographical center of Wisconsin sur- rounded by a. net-work of railroads it is convenient to larger cities and towns. Morally, the town is above the average. Here, located upon a farm of 500 acres in the most fertile section of the state, the school is especially founded to meet the need of our.hoine missionaries' chil- dren and all worthy young people of limited means, giving the rare oppor- tunity of earning ah education. The oerabys given employment on the farm and the girls in the kitchen and iu the dormitories. Believing that a college is not simply a place to make scholars, Northwest Collegiate Institute aim! ai making men and men and womanly women, and the best place for such a training is a Christian college. Here, under a corps of teachers of the highest Christian character, the students are surrounded with the purest influences, teacher ind pupil are brought into closest contact, dining at the same table i and joining together in morning and eve- ning devotions, thus giving, careful at- tention to the .Christian character of every young man and woman. It offers a regular academic course with two years equal to the seventh and' eighth grade work for those who for various reasons have been unable to at- tend school at the usual age or time, Classical, scientific and English prepara- tory courses with musical and biblical courses. The bible if given a prominent place, one hour each day being devoted to its study. OBITUARY. MH8. AUTHUR LaVAQUE. Theresa, the wife of Arthur LaVaque of Blron, died this (Thursday) morning at o'clock. had been sick since February and for two months past has been considered dangerously 111. Mrs. LaVaque was Jhe daughter of C. Crotteau and was born iu Theresa, Dodge county, about 46 years ago. The family have lived in this .county since 1805 and are well-known to the older settlers here. Mrs. LaVaqne's father died about 12 years ago. Her mother is still living, also five brothers and two sisters. They are Leonard of Cloquet, Jasper of Merrill, Curtis of Biron, Oscar of this city, Elmer of Blron, Mrs, R. T. Shaddock and Mrs. N. J. Richards of this city. Mrs. LaVaque'a husband and six children survive her, although the husband Is very sick and not expected to live. The children are Daisy, Gerley, JSlla, Eva, Earl and Joseph. The be held in the. 88. Peter Pauls-Catholic church in ttjls city at 10 a: in. Saturday. JOHN-MULLEN. Thos. Mullen, received.the news of his brother's tragic death in a fire in a hotel at. Llbby, Montana, early this week. His remains will be brought to this city for'interment. John Mullen formerly made nis home In this city, but for a number of years has been engaged in business in the west. He made his aged parents a visit here only a short time ago, just previous to his mother's death. V MBS. FRANCES COMPTON. On Wednesday Mrs. W. T. Jones re- ceived a telegram announcing the sudden death of her mother, Mrs. Frances Compton, at her home- in Glen Ridge, N. J., where she had been making her home for the past few years. Mrs. Compton was about 65 years age and had made Gr.and Rapids her borne'.the greater" part of her life, coming here in her youth and: rearing a family here. She went east a.few years ago with her family where she had .since resided. Her son, Frank, of Chicago has gone east and will bring her retoains to this city for burial in the "early part of; the week. Mrs. Compton was a mother greatly beloved by her family, and was always very popular in social circles in this city. was received from Glen Ridge stating that Mrs. Coin- top died from a stroke of apoplexy. A DDK SHAW. Don Shaw, son..of Rev. B. J. H. Shaw, the former pastor of the Congregational died at Amboy; III., a week ago Saturday after several weeks illness with typhoid fever. He bad nearly re- covered from the disease, when a sudden relapse carried him off. He was twenty years of age and ,well known to the young people of this city. The burial occurred at Hartland, Wis. T.; A. Taylor and daughter, Helen, went to Hartland last week Tuesday to attend the funeral. WILLIAM i'RITZ Died at his hpme at 218 Thirteenth avenue north Tuesday after a two weeks' illness with kidney trouble. Funeral services were held at the First Moravian church this, Thursday, afternoon, Rev. Meillcke officiating. Mr. Fritz was 60 years of age and had been a resident of the city for several years. He leaves a wife and family of grown children: Lincoln t'lonr le considered the best flour in Grand Rapids, price per 100 pounds. bond with each sack JOHNSON HILL Co. lonii A. Btnmtn, Xtpnbliun cudidite for District Attorney, rteftttlr on hii candidacy, prtptred tbt following itittnunt. In my campaign for the Republican nomination for District Attorney, E have been asked frequently to state my views on political matters and the duties of a District Attorney. The new primary law has abolished all caucuses and conventions. On the 4th of September the republicans will make their own selection ol candidates at the primary election, Every voter can then express his choice directly from, governor to corner without the inter- vention of anybody. The individual voter Is now supreme. He has a right to know how each candidate stands. It will be impossible for me to meet all all the voters of the county, and for that reason I take this means of declar- ing myself. I have always been and am now in har- mony with the state and national adminis- trations. I shall continue to do everything in my power as a Republican and Dis- trict Attorney, if elected, to assist in carrying out the recent legislation and have it strengthened. If need be. If nominated, I shall lead a lively speaking campaign in this county for progesaiva legislation and republican principles. The office of District Attorney is one of the most important in the county. Upon the District Attorney devolves 'the duty of protecting life and property from- criminals. I fully realize this responsibility, and if entrusted with it, I shall dia- charge my duty fearlessly and impartially. I believe in looking into the facto each case carefully, solely with the Idea of meeting out justice. No man should Da unjustly prosecuted, and np man should escape jast prosecution, whether rich or poor.'jiowerful or humble. I believe In an economical admlnistratlpn. the people's money should be spent only in the Interests of the people. In all these matters I shall be governed by my conscience and oath of offce. Coanty matters shall have precedence over my private law practice. My office will con- tinue to be at the county seat, where if will be easily tp all the people of the county at time. As to my fitness to hold submit my record as a lawyer and former principal of high schools, judicial records of thacpunty show that I have had considerable success .In trying cases. I have no other .backing except my record. If you think I have the honesty, ability and courage to fill the office, and the vlewa here expressed are such as to merit your approval; I shall be glad to receive yonr support. If shall endeavor to show that I am worthy of your suffrage and confidence. Grand Rapids, July LOUI8 A. The expense per year has been re- duced to a minimum, so that with the excellent opportunity of self-help no young man or young woman need be Ithout an education. The total cost per year is only which includes tuition, board and room and Incidental fee. The school will open in September. Plans for the necessary buildings are under way and the summer will be a busy one in providing accommodations Tor the influx of students, a large num- ber of which are assured. Success for such an institution is certainly 'apparent it has a right to succeed, it will meet a necessity long looked (or and give to our yonng people who are eager to earn an education a school to which they may go, giving encouragement to that very end. [t will never fall to appeal to the of chrlltUn education at meeting a need which li supplied by no otter and surely, thltiithe "right kind of a college." Kev. Wm. J. AgnoW, lecretary and ieneral manager, Sherry, Wla., will fladly (Ire toy farther Information. Highest CASH market price paid for Mneberriea at the office. Lost Graduates. In a recent magazine article, a writer questioning the value of college educa- tion states that, "Not one in fifty of the graduates of our universities and colleges are ever heard of after graduation." Meaning, we suppose, that but few achieve success. That the graduates of the Wisconsin Business University are more successful, is shown by ths follow- ing: La Crosse, WIs., June Mr. F. J. Toland, Dear answer to your request as to salaries paid Wisconsin Business University students, now employed by the Gund Brewing Co., will state that the combined monthly salaries of your graduates now In our employ Is or total of per annum. Yours C. G. Keenan, Bookkeeper, Gund Brewing Co. The wonderful success of Mr. Toland's graduates In securing employment has never been equalled by any similar school. More than five thousand aie now em- ployed. It will pay anyone, contempla- ting business education, to send for his catalogue which the of a thousand employed graduates. It can be tecnred by addressing, W. B. U., La Crowe, WIs. A little love, a little wealth, A little home for you and me; Iff all I aik except good health, Which cornea with Rocky'Mountain Tea. Sold by J.E.Daly. LOUIS A. BAUMAN TO THE VOTERS. HYMENEAL. Tuesday morning at nine o'clock at 88. Peters Paula Catholic church Mr. Francis John Zoelle and Miss Mary Elizabeth Beyer raarrlied by Rev; Father B. Hugenroth. Miss Mae Zoelle of Watertown, a sister of the groom, acted as bridesmaid and Bert Bever, brother of the bride, as best man. After the ceremony a delectable break fast was served to the wedding party, the family and a few intimate friends at the home of the bride's mother, Mrs. Barbara Bever. on Washington avenue. The house had been artistically decorated with ferns and daffies and presented a very pretty appearance. Mr. and Mrs. Zoelle left in the afternoon via the Northwestern road for a two weeks' tour in the east and will visit Niagara Falls, Detroit, etc., during their absence. They will he "at home" in Grand Rapids after September first. Mrs. Zoelle has been one of'Wood County's most success- ful teachers, is of a genial.'.happy dis- position that has endeared her to a jlarge circle of friends. Mr. Zoelle Is agent for the'Northwestern road In Grand Rapids and during his stay In the city has made many friends who will join with the LEADER in extending con- gratulations to him and his bride. The guests from abroad present at the wed- ding were: Misses Mae and Hattie Zoelle of Watertown, M. J. Bever and Mrs. Margaret Lindsley of Bruce and Mrs. Barbara Langdon of Tomahawk. POMAINVILLE-BEBABD The wedding of two wellknown Grand Rapids young people, Di. George Pomainville and Miss Jennie Laura Berard took place at S3. Peters Pauls Catholic church Wednesday at cine o'clock, Rev. Father Hugenroth officiat- ing. The young people were attended by Miss Grace McCarthy and Edward Pomainville. _ A dainty wedding break- fast was served after the ceremony at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. Mrs. Luclan Berard, on Sixth street, at which only relatives were present. At In the afternoon Dr. Pomainville and wife left for a short visit In Chicago and Milwaukee after which they will return to Or.md Rapids for a few days before going to their home at Wauman- dee where the doctor haa established a good practice In his profession. Both the bride and groom were born and reared In this city, graduates of the public schools here, and have a host of friends In this city and county whom we join In extending congratulations. Grand Rapids T8. tola. Last Sunday afternoon there was a, lively game of ball at the fair grounds between Grand Rapids ind lola. The two teams had met previously In a game at lola, earlier in the season, Grand Kapids winning by, a tally or In a score of five or six. Both teams had improved since they last met but Grand showed much the greater im- provement and carried off the honora by a score of 18 to 1. The home team haa been so reorganized and drilled and en- cdiiraged to exert all their ability as bail players that they are now regarded aa the strongest team vthe city over had and their future games this season will be watched with great Interest by a grow- ing base ball constituency in this city. Grand Rapids is scheduled to play Merrill next Sunday and a large number of Grand Rapids people are plaiming to see the-game. That Packing Plant. Some Doubting Thomases have ques- tioned the probability of the building of the packing plant which we reported a couple of weeks ago as in process of organization. We want to add another word of encouragement for the benefit of the doubters. This packing plant will be. built. The men interested in the deal are working steadily for its success and' are meeting with encouragement in, several points outside of this city as well as here. The establishment ot the plant here is going to greatly benefit the city, not only during its building but for years afterward. It will employ a large number of men besides making a great, market and shipping point here, and Grand Rapids people should do every- thing possible to help the enterprise along. Its establishment will be at direct benefit to every man In business and incidentally beneficial to every property holder in the city. Advertising Which is Worth While, id ty. The First National, Bank has today begun a aeries of advertisements which will be worth the while of all our readers to follow. The series will be called "banking made plain" and will coniiat of a short explanation each week of some subject connected with the banking busi- ness. Among others will be "How to endorse a "Loans and "Sight "How to draw a check" etc. All of us are more or less rusty on some of these subjects and a few pointers will make our transactions at the bank easier and more profitable. Church Notice. There will be the regular morning service at the Baptist church next Sun- day, at which the pastor will preach. Young people's meeting at p.m. Evening lervlce In union with other churches at the German Moravian church. Hlgheit market price paid for at the LEADKH office. Special Notice. The Merrill game at Grand haa been changed to the 22nd day of July, Instead .of the 15th of July heretofore announced. Services Service! at St. John', church will to returned on Sunday, July 16th. Bar. Father will be In and conduct the nervlce.   

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