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Wisconsin Valley Leader Newspaper Archive: September 7, 1905 - Page 1

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Publication: Wisconsin Valley Leader

Location: Grand Rapids, Wisconsin

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   Wisconsin Valley Leader (Newspaper) - September 7, 1905, Grand Rapids, Wisconsin                             1.50 PER YEAR GRAND RAPIDS, WISCONSIN. THURSDAY. SEPT. 7, 1905. VOL. IV.'WUMBER 26 ORGANIZEDJ872. FIRST NATIONAL BANK GRAND RAPIDS, WIS. Statement of the condition of the bank on Augr. 2Sth? 1905, as made to the Comptroller of the Cur- rency, analized and explained so as to be easily understood by everybody. (The bank is examined twice a year by a National Bank Examiner and in addition the Comptroller calls for a statement'five times a year, at irregular intervals, without giving notice in advance of the time) Resources Loans and .This includes all the notes and accounts hold by the bunk against farmers and business inon, and protected by approved security. The word ''discounts" as iu bank state- meats means notes on which the interest is paid in advance. -In other words, notes thut were discounted. Cash Ateans (or S6S.OSI.03 The law requires National Banks to keen an amount equal to 15 cent of their total de- dosits in ready cosh, in order to be prepared tojmy depositors when they need the money. To he doubly safe we always keep more money than the law requires. At the present time our reserve equals over 24 fcer cent of our deposits, and is mudo up us follows: Actual Cash in our vaults (ffold, silver, and Cash Deposited in bunks in large cities, subject to check............ Cash Deposited with the U. S. treasurer to redeem any of our batik notes which nmy be presented to him................................. When our bank notes become mutilated or worn out any bank or individual can grct new money from the U. S. and any amount so paid is charged to this account, which is called the "5 per cent redemption fund." United States The value put on these bonds is considerable less than they are actually worth if (placed on the market for sale, Banking House, furmtarennd fixtures.......... This includes the building and office rooms where we are now located (with safe, counters and other fixtures) and the lot on which our new building: is being1 built.' together with u part of the new building which has already been paid for. This property is worth much more than the value placed on It above. Total Iu other words the notes, cash, bonds etc. owned by the bunk arc worth the above amount fund more if the and real estate were placed on the market and sold for their real value.) Liabilities Deposits This includes or money de- posited subject to check, and also interest bearing: deposits for which the depositor holds tt Savings Bank Book or a certificate of deposit National Bank Notes Outstanding These are one of the common forms of money. They .are engraved and printed by .the Government and are secured by Government bonds deposited by the bank with the U. S. treasurer. Total Actual Liabilities.... You will notice.that our resources are more than our actual liabilities. ThU difference represents our Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits, us follows, Capital I S50.00O.OO This capital has been paid into the bank in cash by the stockholders, and cannot be with- drawn. Surplus... The surplus Ls a guarantee fund laid aside by the Directors to provide for any possible losses. If the bank should happen to meet with a loss it could be paid out of this surplus fund without disturbing1 the capital or im- Piiriiig: the safety of the bank. Undivided Profits. This represents the profits of the bank above the expenses since the last dividend day. July 1, 1905. Sometimes the profits are allowed to accumulate for several months before nuy disposition is made of them. In Addition to the capital and surplus, the stockholders are personally liable under the law for in case; it is necessary to protect the depositors. Hence the bank would have to loose 3125.000.00 before it would be possible for our customers to loose one cent, which makes a de- posit in the FIHT NATIONAL BANK of Grand Kapids us as a Government bond. WHO IS YOUR TAILOR 7 WHO IS YOUR TAILOR We Take Orders For ED. V. PRICE CO And Can Save You From to Per Suit SLAUGHTER BEGINS. Hunting: Season Ushers in Damage to Hnntcrs by Gun Fire. Joseph Weller of the Ten-Mile creek on the Portage road brought out his faithful old shot gun Saturday to take a shot at a prairie chicken that had come Fall Suiting. j Draw Petit Jurors. What about your suit or winter over-j The jury commissioners met in the coat, Have you thought of it yet? j city this week and pioceeded to draw We have just received a assort-! jurors for the October term of the cir ment of flne woolens for the fall and cult court. The list is as follows: winter trade. Being always with the I Win. Thleinke, Jr.....Auburndale Town most fashionable tailoring establishments in this country> we are in a position to upon his property. In the act of firing guarantee a Djce stylish garment for our _. it.- .t... 1__Jl_ customers. We made hundreds nf those suits worn here last summer and spring. Yet we have here lots of men having clothes made outside of the city; it is this trade we want. Gentlemen, remem- ber that the work we turn out is not that done by the ai'eragq country tailor, but such as is being done by high priced men in Chicago and New York. By over- coming this prejuice, we will keep many at the bird the gun exploded, badly lacerating the left hand. He was brought to Grand Kapids and Dr. Looze amputated the index finger at Kiver View hospital, where the patient is lodged. The index linger could not be saved but the rest of the hand will be as good as ever when it heals. Buiile Kruger, an employee in the Whiting paper mill at Stevens Point, was hunting chickens near Meehan in ou'r town is spent other- station Friday, ilter taking a rest from L.i8e -80niewhere else. Graad Rapids hunting he.arose to continue his journey Tailorlng Ca_ Frank Cutter and ind pulled the muzzle of his gun toward him. The gun went off, the charge of shot entering the breast of young Kruger. Eledied from the wound twelve hours .ater. Manager. Fine Day for Dedication. Many people assembled at the site of the new Baptist church Tuesday alter- Crauberry Harvest Begins. Cranberry picking begun Monday on :he Searls Bros, Potter and Lester marshes. Bennett's and Gaynor-Black- stone's forces expect to begin Thursday. Searls Bros, have quits a force of Indiana employed and the Gaynbr-BIack- stone Co. will also employ a large number of Indians. The Indian pickers are the most picturesque feature of the cranberry harvest in this section, where many red men, woman and children are employed. No scarcity of pickers is expected this year although it is a little early to judge of the situation. The crop prospects are the best they have been in several years and cranberry people will be rich again when the crop is sold. A frost was expected Monday night, but no damage is reported. Novalty Knse Ball Game. Next Wednesday the local base-ball team will play two games with the Cherokee Indian Team. One game is to be played in the afternoon and the other at night begining at S o'clock. The latter game will be a novelty in this section in.that it is to be played by electric lights. The Indians travel in their own car and carry a canvass fence and a complete electric lighting plant. Entertains for Guest. Last Thursday afternoon from three to six o'clock Sirs. Edward Lynch enter- tained fifty women friends at her home n honor of her sister, Mrs. Portus Baxter. The house was profusely decorated w.ith beautiful and fragrant garden flowers and presented a charm- ing appearance. A portion of the guests played nine games of Miss Laura Duggau winning the first prize, Mrs. Mark Martin the second. The guests not engaged at cards enjoyed a "button hole" contest, Mrs. .Emily Witter easily winning the first prize as the maker of tbe best button hole. Punch was served throughout the after- noon and at five o'clock a dainty collation was served in Mrs. Lynch's inimitable manner. noon to witness the ceremonies connected with laying the corner stone of John helnzen..........Marshfield Town Henry Harock.....Grand Rapids Town S. L. Stevens...................Nekopsa C. 8. Sheerin............Marshfield City Thos. Hannifin..............Sigel Town tlesry Sloven...............Wood Town Henry Town Win. Schultz............Mi'ladore Town Nat Hazeltoc___.......Milladore Town C. W. Evarts...........Milladore Town Axel Edwards Village L. E. Colvio...............Pittsville City Henry A. Sampson, ...................Grand Rapids City Wm. Thientke, Sr..........Arpin Town- Ed. J. Ingle................Rock 'town i red Earth.................... Rudolph Sam Church..........Grand Rapids City Henry Sherman.............Rock Town John Farrish.........Grand Rapids City structure, the program published last week. of which was Not a cloud appeared to dim the boyant spirits of those present, and if the future of the church is as successful as this initial meeting its history will be a happy one. After the services the ladiea of the church served luncheon to a number of patrons. Prominent tiraud Hapids Han Weds at Stevens Point. For three weeks the people of this city have lived in'blissful ignorance of the fact thatE. C. Ketchum, the ice man, and Miss Minnie Ristow, his former house- keeper, were quietly married at the nearby city of Stevens Point. But you can't keep such joyful events from the world, and this week the secret came to light, and Mr. and Mrs. Ketchum have since been receiving the congratulations of a large circle of friends. They are now at home tu friends at the Ketchum homestead at the young black and white hound with brown spots on its legs. Suitable reward given for its return. H. F. LIFCHOW. Stuilio ile-opened. Miss Harriet Williams announces the re-opening of her studio on Oak street at the residence of George W. Purnell, September 4ih 1905. Two public recitiils were given last year by her pupils and a Percy Barnes............Richfield Town the iJohn Town Henry Hackbarth...........Sigel Town Math Pfeifer............Marshfield City Morgan Morris..............Arpin Town Geo. N. Graf...............Dexter Town Leo Rusch................Hanseu Town Fred Getzlaff.......Grand Rapids To'wn Henry Tiinm.........Grand Hapids City F. E. Kellner........Grand Rapida City Joe Rick............Grand Rapids Gity j; J. Canning.......Grand Rapids City- Winze Corriveau----Port Edwards Town C. C. Thresher......... .Marshfield City James Tallant...........Marshfield City Frank Lessig............Rudolph Town Pretty Wedding. Last Wednesday afternoon a pretty wedding was solemnized at the German, Lutheran church, the Kev. J. B. Sruberr father of the groom performing the cere- mony which united in marriage, Mis3 Magdeline Shields and Rev. Victor Gruber of Pittsviile. The ceremony was performed at two o'clock, and after con- graiutions and good wishes were ex- tended, tne bridal party and guests left for the bride's home where a wedding feast was served. The bride is a cbarm- j ing youne lady, and the groom is the well beloved pastor of the Lutheran church at Advocate. large class organized work. for another vear's Fights for a Lost Thumb. Robert, the ten-year-old son of Mr. and I Mrs. Julius Leloff of the South Side, j while playing in a swing at school Tues- day, had his thumb caught in the rope j Society Notices. The west side ladies aid society of the Congregational church will meet Wed- nesday with Mrs. Geo. Metcalfe. The east side ladies aid society of the Ai. E. church will meet next Wednesday in the church parlors. This is tho meet- ing when the members bring in their dollar and tell in poetry of their ex- perience in raising it. The west side Indies aid society ot the M. E. church will meet Wednesday with Mrs. Thompson. The Beaver Queens will meet next Tuesday evening in their hew hall in the Wood Couutv Bank block. CHERRY VALLEY A production of unusual magnitude during a scrimmage and had his thumb j wm he ]U Grand Opera House A I jerk V i scho We Are Offering Sen 20 dozen shirts at 50c on the dollar Jv A few odd ones for men and boys >4 ..I- Shirts go at 50 cents as long as sale lasts, 50 cent Shirts go at 25 cents From Sept. 7th to Sept. 17th Johnson Hill Co. A good looking colored man from Mississippi, president of the Noxuboe Institute, n college for the education, of colored people, spent the past wee.k in tun city working In the interest of his school, He spoke In tho Baptist church in tho morning and in the Congregational church in Hie evening and miide a favorable Impression among' Grand Rapids people, many of whom untiaino Interested In his school work. Considering the amount of trouble the editor has in chasing down good news fo put Into the paper, it becomes n real siicrlticp. when we consent to keep ft good story out of the paper. Our friends don't want to forget this fact. Mr, and Mrs. Mat Yi'.ndenlirooK of tho west side entertained a lew relatives nt their liomi! Friday nfti-nmon In honor of their daughter, Audrey's llrst birthday. A marriage license has beer, issued in Portage county to Geo. Roe of Grand Rapids to Effie Fox to Plover. According to tho Marshlleld Times Jack Mcl'herson, who broke from tho Grand Rnpids jail, visited his wlfo at Marahtlehl a week ago Sunday and after- ward leisurely left town. McPherson seems to have had a lot of fun nt the ex- pense of Wood county. j Saturday night, Sept. Oth. The superb j scenic comedy drama. "Cherry Valley." The i Jin a J Coming to Grand Kapids Schools. The. following scholars, from districts outside of the city are attending the Grand Rapids schools this year: Daisy Thornton. Sadie Rector. Walter Daly, Irene Kccb, Myrtle Aucutt. Roetta Havener, Robert Groskopf, Rose Laugh- lin, Arthur O'Day, Harry Kempfert, Willie Moll, Luln Moll, town of Grand Rapids; Leonard Voyer, Carson, Portage Co.; Mae Cahill, Port Edwards; Stanley Seldon, Dexter; Dora Dankert, Biron; James Bowdeu, Remington; Ella Bunde, ShanagoldenjElla Preston, Eau Claire; Mabel Weinbrenner, Arpin; Lloyd t'ow- zer, Little Wolf; Goldie, Klein, Sherry; Alex Koch, Sigel; Katheryn Johnson, Saratoga; Geo. Matthews, Bertha White, Bertha Gurtler, Port Edwards; Ruth Bennett, Cranmoor: Laura Holliday, Hazelhurst; Katie Lusk, Sherry; Leonard Bender, Seneca: Harry Ktvers, Rudolph; Bert Brenuen, Dancy. Xew form of Statement. The analized statement published this week by the First National Bank is something new in this liua. It will be worth while for all to study this statement as it not oiilv shows the ked off at the first joint. Some of his iChoolmates wanted the thumb, so did Robert, and another scrimmage took j lay jeajs with the people j condition of the bank, but explains the place for its possession with Robert j (n a vjnage the Putomac River I terms used in such a way that anyone victorious. jn but it presents t.n abundance i can understand them, and thus become 'of effects that daring iu their familiar with such matters. The officials Cooper Shop on Fire. John Graither's cooper shop had a close call from the fire fiend Tuesday afternoon. The fire caught in the roof, near the chimney of the furnace. The west side company responded quickly to the alarm, but before they could get a stream on the fire the greater part of the roof was destroyed. There was no i great damage to the stocK and the damage to the building is amply covered by insurance. This is Mr. Graither's particularly busy season, when he supplies the cranberry men with barrels. Walsh Enjoins the Jury Prom Holdin? Inquest on liis Wife. The latest move in the Walsh shooting afuir at Crnndou, is an injunction got out by District Attorney Walsh stop-. plug the iuquest in progress in the case of his dead wife, who was mysteriously shot a week ago, Walsh claims that the men holding the inquest are prejudiced against him and are, trying to make it ap- pear that he shot his wife. The wholo case Is greatly shrouded in mystery and the people of the town are fibout equally divided, some believing Walsh innocent GLORY In "Cherry Valley" magnltudrjtiiul admirable in their exccu- tion. Tlin reproduction of a fishing and others that he Is guilty of his wife's j m) (hc ja said to be death. The tragedy seems to bo another j a tlf conception and case of mlsnmted people, whose continual work tor it la shown .quarrels resulted In what now appears to vlvidiy_ plllV Is 8tarlllng at times be tho sulcldo of thn wile. jn Of HB climaxes and brings Tho exterior of St, Paul dfpot has tho interest to a degree, that is rarely at- received a coat of paint thU week. tnlned even In melodrama, of the First National ar- making every effort to make the bank useful to all classes, and the uew Savings Bank de- partment will be a great help in this direction. Mr. Pease says he wishes the people to know that there is no mystery about the business and that he is ever ready to explain any matters not fully uoderstood, also that small accounts are welcome and will be given just as much attention as the large ones. At the First Moravian Church. Next Sunday morning Chas. Hersch- leb will occupy the pulpit both morning and evening. The evening service as usual will be in the English language. All are cordially invited. Births. sun to Mr. and Mrs. John Sandman of the west side. daughter to Mr. and Mrs. Clement Marceau, Sunday. BIUNDT--A son to Mr. and Mrs. Richard Brandt, Monday. Notice. This is to notify those having drainage taxes in the Portage county drainage district to pay, that I will be at the J. 11. Smith store in Grand Kapids'on Septem- ber 9th, 23rd and SOUi and Oct. 7th, 14th, 21st and 28th, to receive said taxes. GAUI.KK, Commissioner.   

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