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Grand Rapids Wood County Tribune Newspaper Archive: July 26, 1922 - Page 1

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Publication: Grand Rapids Wood County Tribune

Location: Grand Rapids, Wisconsin

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   Wood County Tribune, The (Newspaper) - July 26, 1922, Grand Rapids, Wisconsin                             THE WOOD COUNTY TRIBUNE VOLUME XVIJI NO. 158. WM. P. HUFFMAN, Publisher WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WIS., WEDNESDAY JULY 20, 1922. FILLED-MILK LAW CONSTITUTIONAL COURT DECIDES STATUTE PROHIBITING MANIJ- FACTURE AND SALE OF SKIM MILK COMPOUNDS UPHELD TODAY (By Associated Press) Madison, Wis., July consti- tutionality of tlic Wisconsin filled-milk law was upheld today in a decision of the state .supreme court. The law pro- hibits the manufacture and sale of compounds made of skim milk and cocoanut oil in Wisconsin. Attorneys for the Carnation Milk Products Co., the plaintiffs In the ac- tion to have the law declared uncon- stitutional, have indicated that they would carry their case'to the United tales Supreme court as affecting an article in interstate commerce. Carnal ion Co. .Plainlifl" The attack ou the constitutionality of the law, enacted by the legislature in 1921, was commenced by the Carna- tion company during: September of last' year, in an original action before the supreme court to restrain enforce- ment of the statute by J. Q. Emery, dairy and food eommis.' The measure, which carried through the assembly with 12 dissent- ing votes and passed unanimously by the .senate, was strongly opposed at the time by the milk companies. At hearings'liefoi-e the legislature fan ers from all' over the state appeared, urging passage of the prohibitory measure as a means of curbing an in- dustry, which they said threatened the dairy interests of the state. The almost unanimous action of the legis- lature followed. With the new statute to go into ef- fect in September, the Carnation Milk company, most directly affected by its provisions, during that month before the Supreme court asking for an in- junction. This action was at .once con- tested by Attorney General William J. Morgan. Arguments were made before the -court April 15 of this year, the attor- neys for the milk companies, attack- ing- constitutionality of the measure. Deputy Attorney General Hoyt, repre- sented the state in upholding the legality of the action of the legisla- ture. Contention was made by the com- panies that the statute was an inter- ference with interstate commerce, and its application a deprivation of prop- erty without due process of law, while also in conflict with the equal protec- tion clause of the federal as well as the state constitution. The state contended that the filled- milk compound of skimmed milk and cocoanut oil was of an "inherently fraudulent that its sale should be prohibited under the police Morgan In Stand; For Semi-Annual Payment Of Taxes "Prairie du Sac, Wis., July liam J. Morgan candidate for govern or talked chic-fly of bis farm progran and the burden of taxation caus-et by overlapping 'boards and eommis sions in his address at the Sauk cou- nty picnic here today. The great changes in the principal occupations of the state were advanced by the candidate as reasons for favoring a semi-annual plan for payment of tax- Will Ease Burdens I favor semi-annual payment of Mr. Morgan said in reference to the issue. "The present plan of paying taxes once a year was all right wheji it was adopted; that was years ago when we gran-growing state. our only occupation. were a great Farming was We sold our grain at the end of the year and got our money ill the fall, and January was the most 'convenient lime to pay taxes. Now Wisconsin commerce and industry are as important as farming and the character of our farming is changed. Not Needed The present system accumulates sums in the treasuries of the and its municipalities months huge state before the money is needed to pay the expenses of government. "Twenty states in our union now use the semi-annual payment plan. If. Uncle Sam can give us four instal- ments in which to pay our federal in- come taxes, I guess we taxpayers can permit ourselves to pay our taxes twice a year." COMINGS BLAMES TAXES, TRUSTS FOR H. C. OF L ASSERTS REPEAL OF ESCH-CUM- -VIINS LAW ESSENTIAL TO RE- VIVAL OP INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE Honored By Elks ,'Shot Gun Charge May Cost Leg Of Vesper Farmer Victor Van Natta, living about four miles north of Vesper, is in .the Riverview Hosptal with a badly shat- ered left thigh as the result of the power of the slate to preserve the accidental discharge of a shot late Sunday afternoon. When gun Mr. Inequitable taxation and unrestrain- ed monopolies were attacked by Lieut. Governor George Comings, LaFollctte candidate for renomination, in an ad- Iress at the East Side band stand A'ed. night, as the causes, direct or ndirect or nearly all the evils that icset the people of Wiscvonsin today. Ic explained the high cost of living is due fundamentally not to a higher landard of living, or lo high wages nit tao excessive.Vr.6nts, transporta- ive dangers and father monopoly ex- ctions. Mr. Comings was preceded by Miss .da James, president of the Wisconsin Vomen's Progressive Association, and y Mrs. C. C. Rosa, both prominent in ivic and political affairs in the state, ho ul-ged the importance of women iking an active intesest in both local ml national governmental affairs, olomon Levitan, Madison banker and aFollette candidate for nomination for stale treasurer, gave some inter- esting side lights on his early life in the state and upon present day politi- cal and economic problems. The speak- ers were introduced by Atty. B. M. Vaughan. A crowd of about attended the addresses. Praise of Senator LaFol- lette by Lieut. Governor Comings was applauded at times, but in the main the audience was undemonstrative. Hits.Tax System The present system of taxation was charged by Mr. Comings with the re- County Judge W. J. Conway. elect- ed to Supreme Justice of Order of Elks. It is a high honor for the local jurist. Name W. J< Conway Chief Justice Of- Elk's Grand Forum Van Natta was first brought to the hospital it was believed that the leg would have to be amputated, but phy- sicians in charge of (he case are now hopeful that it may be saved. The victim will be confined to the hospital lor months, bou'ever. Mr. Van Natta had started after his cows shortly before.six Sunday evening, when he saw a flock of chicken hawks. He house for his shot returned to his gun, but found public health, and asked that a judg- ment be entered dismissing the action. The state claimed that the product was deficient in nutritive value. Vesper Guernsey Meeting ,2.10 attended the annual sum- of the Wood County Guernsey Breeders Association, held Wednesday afternoon at the A. P. Bean farm near Vesper. Sol. Levitan, a LaFollctle candidate for state treas- urer and Licut.-Gov. Comings addres- sed the meeting. Mayor 0. K. Roenius of Wisconsin Rapids was a speaker. Mr.'Murray of the Stale Breeders As- sociation also talked and there were cow judging contests and demonstra- tions and it was a very successful meeting. Arrangements were made for putting i'1 exhibits of Guernseys in the Marshfield and state fairs. that the hawks had vanished by the time he again reached the spot. He carried the gun along with him, how- ever, and it is believed that the trig- ger caught in some bushes through which, he was passing, causing the accidental discharge. The.full charge of shot caught him in the loft log ami shattered the thigh bone. He was brought to the Eiveview Hospital Sunday night. Banks Offer New Form Of Service To The Motorists A new idea of service has been in- augurated in the city of Wisconsin Rapids by the First National Bank and the Wood County National Bank These two institutions have provided large parking spaces in the rear of their building where they offer free parking privilcdgc to their patrons ami to the motoring public. Fine new parks have been made in the rear of these institutions which are attra- ctive and in lime will be very useful to the public. George Zwicke, Age 13, Dies George Hwicko, thirteen year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Xwicke, died at his home Wednesday morn- ing, .Inly 10 of Brights disease, after an illness of ten months. Funeral ser- vices were held at the family resi- dence Gfil, liotencrans street, at two o'clock, Friday afternoon Rev. C. A. Meilicko officiating. Burial was in Forest Hill Ccmetary. The most satisfactory way yet de- vised to avoid monthly bills is to pay each. earth. Large Crowd Attends K. C. Picnic At Wausau Sunday The following were among the Wis- consin Rapids people who attended the big barbecue and picnic held at Mara- thon Park, Wausnu, on Sunday, given under the auspices of the Wausau Council, Knights of Columbus, for all the K. C. councils in the Wisconsin River Valley: Rev. .William Reding, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. McGrogan, Mr. anil Mrs. John Brcnnan, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Jlohs, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Schill and family, Mr. ami Mrs. Andrew Schill, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Rcinhart and chil- dren, Mr. anil Mrs. Joseph Kirschling, Mrs. A. Hirzy, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Kron and children, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. llanneman Jr.' ami children, Peter Reiland, Mr. and Mrs. M. Schlig, Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Trudell, E. N. Po- mainville, Delbert Trudell, Mr. and Mrs. I. Zimmerman and family, Mr. and Mrs. C. P. Gross and children, Mr. and Mrs. Ray Love and children, Mr. and Mrs. John Hollmuller and sou, George, Mr. and Mrs. Ray Van Al- stine and children, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Reiland, Mrs. N. Reiland, Mr. and Mrs. D. Reiland, Dr. F. X. Po- aniinvillc and son, Francis, Mr. and Mrs. John Schuabel, Sr., Fred Schna- liol, Emma Schnabel, Mr. and Mrs. John Schnabel, Jr., and children, Mr. and Mrs. M. ICrnser and son, Matthew, Mr. and Mrs. W. 11. Carey, Viguo Carey, Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Billmeyer, and family, Attorney and Mrs. D, U. Conway and family, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Wheir and son, Mr. and Mrs. John Masloff, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Henry and daughter. sponsibility for the unjust distribu- tion of wealth, which he said existed, and with fostering the growth of dangerous and predatory monopolies. He quoted the economist Ely to the effect that taxes may be used either to create or lo destroy monopolies, and pointed to the rapid concentration 'of wealth in the United States as the re- sult of present taxation methods. One- fiftieth of one per cent of the people of the United Stales own one-third of the nation's wealth, he asserted. Turning from the tax, question to the high cost of living Mr. Comings asserted that there were three chief contributory causes which in substance- were: High rents, due to a partial monopoly in land; high prices of coni- modities conlrolled by virtual monop- olies; and high freight rates permit- ted by the Esch-Cunlmins transporta- tion act. He advances a revised system of taxations as a remedy for Ibc first two, and the repeal of the Esch-Cum- mins act as a remedy for the latter. "It is not high labor costs that arc responsible for the high cost of living Those who advance wages as the cause are putting the cart before the liorse. Labor must receive high wages to live under the present regime of high prices. Only after the cost of living has beeif reduced can wages possible be reduced." He quoted A. P. Bean of Vesper to the effect that the Esch-Cummins law s the one great factor responsible for .he depression in business and agricul- ;ure and asserted that the condition could not be remedied until the law was repealed and transportation rates reduced to the point where the normal flow of business could be carried with- out the great burden now imposed upon it. High Freight Rates Burden "With freight rates at their present levels the farmer can neither buy ma- terials that he needs at a reasonable OUTLOOK BRIGHT K. L. HATCH TELLS FIELD DAY CROWD SAYS INDICATIONS POINT TO STRONG DEMAND AND fiOOD PRICES FOR FARM AND DAIRY PRODUCTS CountyJudge W. J. Conway of th city who has been in attendance the national Convention of the B. 0. Elks at Atlantic city has been e cvated to the office of Chief Justi of the Grand Forum of the lodg The election to this high office is distinct honor to the local jurist an to the Wisconsin Rapids lodge. H choice to the hjeh office of Chief ju tice brought forth .many congratula lions from his many Elk brothers an friends in the city. Judge Mrs. Conway returned Thurs. morn ing from an extended trip through out the east. Ranks Next to Ruler The position of Chief Justice of th Grand Forum which is the suprem court of the order of the Elks, rank next to that of Grand Exalted Rule of the order and much sough for position by the legal- lights in th Elks order who arc chosen to th Grand Forum. Associated with Judg Conway on the Grand Forum are se veral emminent jurists of the nation They are .Chief Justice Kennon of th Supreme Court of California, Judg Carton of Michigan. Judge H. L Keenan of Washington, and John C Price, attorney general of Ohio. Chie Justice Browne of the Supreme Cour of Florida is the retiring member o the Grand Forum. Hud Long Trip Judge and Mrs. Conway spea highly of the splendid welcome ac corded at the Atlantic seaport and o: the social functions to the officers o the Grand Lodge. At the close of the convention Judge and Mrs. Conway continued their trip to New York- Washington and Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. P. C. Daly who Icfl here to attend the convention, whicl Mr Daly was delegate of the loca lod ge, are extending their trip furthei to New York, Washington and othei eastern cities. figure, nor can he ship his products at a. profit. The high rates are the foun- dation of the vicious system which by adding profit after profit, and inflated charge after inflated charge increases costs many fold without giving any commensurate service or increase value." Quoting Justice Eosenberry of the The United States lighthouse ser- vice maintains lights and other aids to stale supreme court: "Society must he organized so that the man who gets a dollar must give 100 cents worth of service, he charged that the railroads were run on a basis of getting the maximum charge for the minimum of service and that only through direct government control and operation could the ideal of the maximum of service for the minimum charge be attained. Wages Not Caught Returning to the matter of high ivagcs for labor as reflected in the cost of living, the speaker quoted lig- ures lo show that in modern machine I industry, such as the knitting or tex- tile indutsry, even fairly well paid labor received often as low as onc- lenth of the selling price of the prod- uct produced, and never over one- fourth or in extreme cases one-third. The look-out man on the navigation along miles of coast the world's largest liner, is line and river channels, a length to above the water level, an nearly twice the circumference of tho I weather has a view Majeslic, 1KO foot in clear Cammack-Ruskowsky Wedding Is Solemnizec Miss Dorothy Kyle Cammack, on- ly daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Ca- mmack of Nekoosa and William R. Ruskowsky of Nekoosa, son of Mrs. Mary Ruskowsky of Chicago, were united in marriage Wednesday after- noon at four o'clock at the home of the bride's parents. Rev C. A. O'Ncil pastor of the Congregational Church of Nekoosa, performed the ceremony. The bride wore a gown of white georgette and carried an arm bouquet while her bridesmaid Miss Alice Mil- ler of Mansion, wore pink georgette crepe. The groom was attended by George Anderson of Nekoosa. Following the ceremony a wedding supper was served at the home of the bride's parents, lo relatives and in- timate friends. Mr. and Mrs. Rusk- owsky left the same evening for a two weeks trip to Chicago, and points in Michigan and Indiana. On their return they will make their home in Nekoosa in the home which the groom has prepared. Miss Cammack is a very popular young lady of Nekoosa. She is a jraduate of the Mansion high school and the LaCrosso Normal, and for :hc past two years has taught in the Sfckoosa public school Mr. Huskowsky las been manager of the Brandt Heal Market at Nlkposa for the past -en years and is Well' and favorably inown. Out of town ignt-sls here for the .vodding were Mr. and Mrs. E. W. ivyle, Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Holgutc, E. W. Pollor and Mrs. Winnie Potler ind son, and Mr and Mrs. Loomis ind daughter, all of Mauslon Mrs. J. A. Devinc of Spooner. _ j square miles of the ocean. Those who say Russia has no overlook printing press. covering some 900' cbincry of government and tho A bright outlook for both the dairj and general farmer was forecast Prof. K. L. Hatch in his address at the Wood and Taylor county field day ai :he Marshfield Experiment statior Friday morning. The field day wa: attended by over farmers, arge percentage of whom were frou Wood county. Professor Hatch analyzed the situa tion as it exists at present both in re ;ard to cheese and other dairy prod- ucts and small grains. Good Demand Assured With the heaviest part of the milk- ng season he said, "cheese warehouses are only half full of good cheese, selling at about 17 cents. Con- .rasling this with the situation a year ago, when the warehouses were filled o overflowing with cheap 12 cent iheese, it is obvious dairy farm- :rs and cheese makers are assured this -ear of a good demand and a fair price for the products. The situation in regard to grains is also favorable, Mr. Hatch asserted, and farmers in general may expect tc receive good prices for crops of all sorts. Condensery Situation Dubious The only pessimistic note sounded was in regard to the condensery busi- ness, which is not as good as it might be. Many Wisconsin condenseries are now lying idle, while others are hav- ing difficulty in finding adequate mar kets for their products. The afternoon was largely de.-oted to demonstrations of various sorts. Methods of handling poultry and live- stock were shown and groups of farm- ers were taken over the various exper- imental plots at the Marshfield station and shown at first baud the most sue cessful methods of producing various crops. Awarded Contract At Duluth, Minn. Announcement was made Thur. by C. D. Walter, engineer of the Rood Construction Co. of this city of thi award of a feet title-contrac icar Duluth, Minn. Mr. Walter am Leslie Hill of this city will leave sooi for the north to pwork out 'details o the big job. Mrs. Walter and famil; .vill accompany them to Duluth t articular novelty, such a joint finan- -ial pool is something new. What does this mean to the farmer Briefly that: ONE: He will be assisted in the settlement of new lands. Such Jand tevelopment promotion long since has lecome a national cry. TWO: He will be provided with 'unds for purchase of land, equipment, iye stock, buildings and improvements. THREE: have a long term >f years to repay the loan, under the imortizatipn plan which collects grad- lally from the earnings of the land. FOUR: He will have supervision of :he government Federal Loan Farm Board. FIVE: If already on the land, he vill be abie'to.liquidafce-ejiistmg in- lebtedness. It is not for the farmer alone that( this understanding is launched. By de1- l lt farms and assisting new se-, <-t Elements, the business of merchants, bankers and others will ;row. Back of the project is a gener- d development program. co-ordinating problems, as well is finances of six stales, so far as he "in union there is strength" slo- jan is certain to show commercial re- mits. A joint stock land bank does not ake part in transactions such as are associated Uvith conimer- :ial banking. Its business is solely to up the idle dollars and send horn to the farmers. 'arm conditions have vitally change-'.f, d. The early settler needed little ca- lital or experience land wag cheap. Today, if we arc to increase land se- .tlcment, propel1 equipment, and bus- ness methods- must enter into the leal. Under government supervision de- 'inite interest-rates are established j. '.mount of loans gaged and other :afeguarding processes required. This undertaking is simply a mo- !ern cooperative way of making eap- tal in large quantities available to he farmers as easily as to' any kind :f essential business. Clarence Grode Purchases Barber Shop From Father i 3 make an especial appeal to tourist Clarence Grode has purchase' I tho barber business from his father .agles Plan Big Membership Drive; Initiate In August A drive for over twenty five new embers is planned by the local of the Fraternal Order of Eag- Membership teams are now scek- g now members and plans are to ld the initiation of the large class candidates within tho next month. Wausau acric drill team, said to the best in the stale has been en- ged ork. lo come bore for aylor County Woman Seeking Sheriff's Job Med Charles Pitzke, Deer creek, has filed her nomination papers for the office of sheriff for Taylor county. There are nine candidates run- ning for sheriff in the county, eight of whom are men. Every part of the county is represented. F. X. Grode. He has been employee, by his father for a number of year: in tho shop, and will take possessiot the first of August F. X. Grode has conducted the bar her in Nekoosa for over twenty years He will devote his lime now to tin Giodc Nash Paper Co., and to hi: real estate business. Mrs. Helke Returns From Postmasters' Convention Mrs. IT. II. Helke, postmistress., ol Nekoosa, has returned from Wausar where she atlended the League o! Postmasters convention which wa there. She was accompanied bj Mrs. S. Wbittlesey of Cranmoor. The convention was for third and fourth class postmasters of which then! are sixteen in the county. Near- ly all were represented at the meet- ing Mrs. Helke staled. Tornado Victim Fund Drive Shows Generosity Of County The campaign to raise funds for the iaid of western Wisconsin tornado vic- tims has been making steady progress in Wood county, according to County .Agent R .A. Peterson, in charge of the drive, who states that a steady stream of small contributions is being Many churches, and other religious, jare taking up the work, and Mr. Peter- son is confident that before the cam- paign is ended Wood county will have made a substantial contribution to Hie state wide relief fund. The boxes that have been placed in all the banks of the county are not receiving a great deal of attention, Mr Peterson said, and he urged those desiring to make small contributions to take advantage of them. Donations of all sizes are desii-ed, and the con- Iribulions of those- able to gice only a few cents well be appreciated as much larger gifts. Electi'ic gates for bee hives, which will register the number of arrivals and departures on the part of the bees, have been invented by a United States Government official, Postpone Mosinee Game The game scheduled for Sunday between the local Consolidated nine and tho Mosinee Legion team was put over nplil next Sunday at the re- quest of the upriver management. The postponement deft the Consols without a game for the week end. With the aid of a very delicate seis- mometer the shock of the Atlantic ocean beating- upon the west coast of Ireland has been felt and recorded in Birmingham, England,   

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