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Grand Rapids Daily Tribune Newspaper Archive: July 1, 1920 - Page 1

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Publication: Grand Rapids Daily Tribune

Location: Grand Rapids, Wisconsin

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   Grand Rapids Daily Tribune (Newspaper) - July 1, 1920, Grand Rapids, Wisconsin                             COME OVa TO OUt TOWN JULY 5TH THE BAND WILL OUT GRAND RAPIDS DAILY TRIBUNE FIFTH YEAR NO. 21.11 CKAND UAPIDS, WISCONSIN, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, WHOLE TRAIN BURNS IN MIHH. FEW HURT mm I _____. W V 8 R.M. GIBSON IS ADJUTANT FOR LEGION AGAIN HAW CMIKK 4'HOKKV KOIt XKST liK NKIJTRAI MHoit ItlMi, KK.VOKHA, At the slate of the American Legion mooting In fjreon Hay, Richard .M. Cibscin of this city was-.re-elected the. position of Klalc adjutant of the Legion. Tin- Legion also voted lo take a strictly nculrnl stand In all disputes between labor mill capital. The resolution decinro.i that "the American legion takes Iho stand that us an organization It should not lake any ilolinlle part in any illsputn be- tween employer and employe, nor be- tween capital and labor. This policy should bo adhered to by slate and na- tional orgnntaallons, and local posls us well. There is nothing to prevent an Individual lesion mom tiers, as an Individual, from talking either side In Mich a controversy, but the American Legion, as an organization, unit not. do so." rniiiiciii Ad, The legion, after a heatcil debate repealed by n closo vote Ihe resolu- tion adopted earlier in the day, which provided for a searching Investiga- tion of the records ot nil candidates lor public otllce. ricaliziiiK that tho lilungn Into politics was directly op- posed to nil tenets heretofore held by the organization, It was declared', the delegates vqlertjo, pass up all politi- cal questions. The legion went on record as fa- voring Instruction in no language in the schools of the stntc except Eng- lish. The legion further demanded strict enforcement of the selective service law, and pledged support in rounding up slackers. Van Claire Chosen. The legion by adoption of a resolu- tion wcnl. unanimously on record as In favor of universal-military train- ing. Several other resolutions of a min- or nature were, adopted. A lengthy measure offered by Mnj. R. A-. Fitz- Piitrir.k, secretary of the state board of education, put the legion on record as be.ing in favor of an elaborate plnn lor improving the educational system of Hie stntc of Wisconsin. With tho ond in view of currying on a cam- paign of Americanization through the schools. An effort to amend the constitu- tion ot the legion so as lo enable of- ficers ot the organization lo hold pub- lic otllce, was defeated. .11 was unanimously decided thai, .the 1H21 state convention will be held in Kau Claire on June 2S, 20 and 30. Claudius J. Kciioshn. was elected state, commander, at the elec- tion of otllcers Wednesday aflcrnonn. Oilier ofllcers chosen were: J. A. Askew, Milwaukee, vice com- mander. Richard M. Cibson, Oramf slale adjutant. R. W. Reiser. Superior, stain I'.nancR officer. .Patrick Plnne. Waitsau. slate his- torian. Oakley 1'arkhill, Ahbostford. ser- seanl Hi arms. The Risv. I'cter L. .Inhnson. Madi- son, stall! chaplain. UNION MEN BUILDING PORT HEADQUARTERS PORT KUWAKHK AND NKKOOSA BUILD HOME FOR PAI'KIJ UNION UNDERWAY The nif-mbers of Ihe paper makers union, who have been on. a strike at Co.'s mill, arc bnildinjr r. hall and headiHiarlers on (he Windleiim pro- perly near those cilicS. When completed this buildini: will sei-vc as the InicincsF iVomc for the union of Nckoosa and Port Edwards. NEW IMHV C.IRL Mr. and Mrs. Edward Itetil of Minnea- polis, announcing the birth of a baby on .lime Mrs. Kenl was for- merly Miss Esther IVIawi'.ls of city. SCOUTS TO BE ON DUTY AT BiCCELEBRATION YOUNCSTERS WILL MEET AT THE DAY. The Hoy Scouts of this city meet al the Armory at nine o'clock Monday, July 5, and have an import- ant part in th'c days celebration. will worked to tho limit during the celebration. Times like this give Ihe Scouts an opportunity to show th'at they can be of valuable service to (he city country. when it was announced lint the city had given permission lo the ms bead out nf the.water. FORMER PITTSVILLE The funeral services oC Mrs. ihrlHllne Krickson Muyiini, dauKhlei f .Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Hrickson, who rosldo three miles north of Piltsvlllo, were held on June 30 nl one o'clock from tho home of her parents, and at one-thirty at thc. Congregational church Is Pittsvillc, Hev. Noel J. reed of Ibis city officiating. The Misses and Liken furnisheil nnsie al Ihe church. Interment fol- owed in Die Pillsville cemetery. Tho deceased was born and raised In Pittsvillc ami lived there mull five years ago when she went west in lake up u. homestead. While in Ihe west slfc me! .1. Ilnyiim In whom she was married on October .mill. Her death occurred on Juno 23 in Havre, Montana, where-she resided. She by her husband, a wclve day old buby, her parents, nml brothers and sisters of 1'itts- ille. 97 IS HIGHEST MARK REACHED_DUR1NG JUNE UNSETTLED WEATHER CONDI- TIONS PUEDICTED: NOT MUCH CHANGE IN TEMPERATURE. cloudy and unsettled condi- tions with' possible showers are Ihe for Ihis vicinity, according to Geo. T. altho not. much change in temperature is reported. Mr. Nixon reports that tempera- tures are nearly normal over the greater part of the wea- ther is unsettled. The highest temperature register- ed yesterday was SO and live lowest 59. Tho climntological dada for the month of June 1920 is as Highcst temperature'97; lowest 42; total rainfall 6.38 inches; greatest rainfall in twenty-four hours 2.39 in- ches on June 2S; there were thirteen rainy days, seven clear clays, nine partly clear days, and fourteen cloudv days. CASE AGAINST HALL IS DISjmsSED TODAY CHARGED WITH STEALING HAY HAKE IIIJT JUSTICE SAYS. ''NO CAUSE FOU ACTION" On complaint of Clark Snyder. Earnest Hal was brought bcfnre'jus- ice C. A. Boorman this morning on the charge of stealing a hay rake. Ulorncy C. E. Uric'rc handled the case for the defendant. Hall claims ihat the hay rake was borrowed by .lime one else. Justice Moorman dismissed thn case, with the statement ihat there wan no cause for action. WINNERSATSKATMEET At Ihe Skat tournament, held at he Klkss Club Tuesday evenimr. .he following were declared if -I'1. Cnolcy. 17 net g; Kdw. lloiigcn, loints. Hamilton. net gamos. lircnner. -127 net points. Warren. MO high hand. I.ICEXSKI) TO George M. Mitchell and. Ethel Icwitl, Imlh of Crand Rapids. Thc count clerk issued fiO mar- riage for Iho month of June, ig iwirl double (lie number of my previous year. Arnold A. (.'.onklin. of llan- oh. nini Kniiiia Sciiwa'rK. Town or Arpln. net CELEBRATION AT FAIR GROUNDS AND ALONG RIVER I'ARADB TO KM) AT FAIR- GltOUNDS WHERK Itlfl I'ICNU IS iti nu EVENTS ALONG RIVJ2K HANKS Pool when attacked with life guard home for the location of the events on the program for the celebration in Crand Rapids on .Inly-Sih were completed Wednesday ,011 Eighth street. Picnic Monday Noon A community picnic, will be held ;-.t noon following the parade and the band will play during Ihe noon hour. A short patriotic program will be held after Ihe picnic, when the laralion of Independence will bo rend by Hugh Goggins and Ihe commun- ity singing will follow, lead by Her- bert Roach accompanied by the band. The.program will be opened by sinp-.' ing America. CONCESSIONS All those seeking concessions arc. asked to report to Myor of thc com- miltee on Ihe celebration and they will be granted.-Only two have applied for 'concession's thus far hiU, since- the location of the program bus beep, announced there will probably bo others. Afternoon Program. Following the picnic and noonday program the vaudeville and oilier at- tractions will, be held at (he. Pair- grounds. Contests, races and, games will be staged one after the other during the aftertiooiv and at. Lieut. Hart Smith in liis airplane w-il do acrobatics at a height of two thousand feet. Events on River Af'fr the afternoon events thc program will be -continued on the river, where-there will be tilting, log, rolling' and swimming contests and vaudeville west side stunts will ho aloii" river bank. The display will be shot off from the east side river bank about o'clock. G1LMASTER RESIGNS POSTOFFICE HAULING POST OKKICE MAY UK WITHOUT DHAYMAN E. F. Gilmasler Sons, who haul Iho mail to nml; from thc depots for ;be post odkc have rcsisncd their job. Lack of pay was given as the reason for llr. Cilmaster's rusignn- tion. The work of hauling the. mail has iccn awarded in th- past on a basis of bids received. The .job is now open for bids it .is understood. MARKET REPORTS 'Cliicnco butler lower. -Me In 50 li yss higher. Keccipls 10.082 Oriliiinry firsts S9c to -lOc (0 lie- mark, cases included. pai'kfs extras. Storage packes (irsli; rotaloos. slishtly slroniier. itits 20 cars. :asli'ni whilos. nil lo flj.Tf, pP bbl. Southern reds. to pe cwt KEMITKKT VISITS HERE August Kompfert of Camis. Wasb- lutlon. has been in Ihe city Saturday visiting wilh rrla- and friends and looking "own business malfcrs. will return n bis hotne on l-'r'.d.iy. Mr. Kcinp- Vrl. is suprrinl'-ndcnt of the paiwr nill al Camis. Mrs. Kompfert of Ap- ilclon who lias also been hero the >asl week, will also return to her lome Ihis week. SCHUELKE GETS CRAMPS AND SINKS THIRD TIME BEFORE HE IS RESCUED FIGHTS WITH RESCUERS AND KNOCKS OUT ONE OF THEM liEFOHK HK IS H.VALI.V RES- CUED Wednesday about r.ix o'clock Alfred Scliucikc was swim- at His Municipal swimming ci'amps. gelling over'conu supper at tho lime. entirely wilh the cramps and was sinking fur the IhiVd I' him and midland to Rut linall Lnrainic thai, lie was not going to be ablc-tii set him out alone anil called to Claude Forraml, who was standing onilhc edge of the pool, lo come in and jiolp gel Schucl- ke out. Korrand jumped ,in and swam to the scene.of action, lie took a turn at trying to rescue Schuclko ami fought with the lighting, uear- drowninjr man for a: lime. In the mix-up Schuclkc managed to land a blow in Forrand's stomach, which put him out of action for Iho lime being. U-iramie was getting into lighting shape again, and with the assistance of a man from Clinlonville, whose name has nut Ix.'en learned, Schuclke was finally drag.scd ,lo the edge of the (tool. His lungs were full of water and first aid measures were necessary to restore him to active life. Meanwhile Forrnnd was rescued, as he wa practically helpless' after the blov from Schuclkc. Schuelkc is all right today and there were no permanent ill effects of the near drowning. COMMUNITY NURSE AT PORT EDWARDS MILL HAS EXCELLENT RECORD OK PAST SERVICE; STARTS WOIJK JULY 1 The Nekoosa-EdwimIs Paper Co. at Port) Kdwards has succeeded in obtaining the services of ity nurse, Miss Molly B. Smith Baraboo, Wis. She brings with her an a commun- excellent a reg- record of past sen-ice. She istercd graduate nurse of the Chicago Baptist Hospital, was for two yea's assistant superintendent of the Ke- noshu General Hospital, spent thrco and one-half years in public health work and social health work in iios- ton iii connection with Simmons Col- lege, and acted as visiting nurse at Concord, N. H'. During the war she volunteered for Red Cross work and was active in service overseas where she aided in establishing the Red Cross Dispensary at Corbeil, and served in the American Base Hos- pital, and also did Red Cross work in Serbia. The Nekoosa-Edwarils Paper Co. lias set plans for a first aid roo'ni will be in the New Clock House Tho finest equipment obtainable'has been ordered and it promises to be first- class and modern in every respect Miss Smith, started her work 'in Port Edwards today. NO SCOUT CAMPOVER THE COMING WEEK-END SCOUT OFFICIALS WITH FOURTH CKLEKRATIOX I'L.lN'S AM? WORK Thirc will he no (Joy Scwl e-imp "I tlwlr Kirch Lodge "amp this vve-k end because oft IIP fact thai ficoul Executive J. K. Knapp is very busy with (he work of arranging tlic cele- bration here July Tho other men around town who interested in Scout work and arc masters arc likewise busy with Ihe city's celebration and cannot Inkn charge of the camp over Ibis week- end. Thus as no rosnonsililn front ollicinl can lie in attendance there will 10 camp this week end. I RESinEXT ILL W. H. ffotts ,'c ;n .....jcr a physician's care at her home at 225 Grand Aventio, TOURIST CAMP LOCATED HERE ATLYONPARK CHAMItEi: OK COMMERCE AU- KANGKS WITH "ciTY TO USE I'ARK FOR CAMI'INU SITE- (IUEAT ADVERTISEMENT FOK CITY Arrangmcnts have been completed with the city by the Crf.mber of Commerce thru Secretary Fritx.sing- Is Fine Place For Camp Lyon Park is a line place for a tourists camp and ought to be popu- lar with visitors to this city. It is a beautiful river park being located on roiilc I.'! into tho city and like- wise not far from Ihe center of the business district and in a trood neigh- borhood for The car liiic passing the park will be .another feature as well, Chamber of Com- merce officials said West Gains by Sites Frank Dru'mb, managing odilor of the Tribune, now on a trip thm the western states with the Drumb fam- ily wrote the Tribune urging camp sites for Grand Rapids and said that these camps were very popular the west and brought good results to towns having them. He said tourists would often skip towns enroute in order to get to those places wKcre camps were available. The action of the Chamber of Commerce in get- ting a tourist park is x laudable one and with the assistance 'of advcrtis'- injr and good conveniences for, the tourists, Grand Rapids will doubt- less gain by having it. MISS BRZOSTOWICZ WEDS PETER KOT OF STANLEY CEREMONY AT ST. LAWRENCE CililKCH ON WEDNESDAY MOKN1NG The marriage of Louise' Brzostow- icz, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Vin- cent of this city, to Pet- er J. Kot ot Stanley, Wi's., look place Wed. morning at nine o'clock at St. Lawrence church in this city, Rev. of Stanley, broth- er of the brida, performing the mar- riage service. The bride was attired in a gown of white charmcuse and carried white roses. Shu was attended by Miss Emily her sister, as maiil-of-honor, and Miss Victoria Kot, sister of- the groin, as.brides- maid. Frank Kot, brother of the groom, acted as bostmun. Immediately after the ceremony, a breakfast was served at the bride's home lo'lhe bridal parly and rela- tives. The bride has resided in Ihis city for many .years, but has recently lived aMhe home of her brother, liev. Brzoslowicz, in Stanley. The groom lias a substantial position in a cloth- NURSES MOVE TO THEjRJEW HOME HOME IN NEED OF r'URNITUUr AND OTHER EQUIPMENTS; OFFICIALS SAY Tho n'.ir.-ios of Rivervicw Hospila have moved into their new home on Third Street south across from Ihe hospital building and have fixed theii up fairly comfortably Officials of Ihe hospital stated to life Tribune thai the home was verj much in need of furniture for Ihe nurses rooms and for iwrch furnilure It is requested from persons having extra fin nature stored or not in use that this bo limed or given to tho nurses home. A piano it; much desired by the nurses. Jf [here is anyone who has r.n extra piano or one stored where il is not being used now it would bo fi'l'oatly appreciated by live nurses to use during their recreation hour MRS. PARMETER DIED WEDNESDAY AT POINT Kt'XUKAl, HKlti'iCKS HKRK Mil. DAY MOIt.MXC. AT HT. I'KTKH'S. Mrs. Ed Panneter, well iknown resident of this city, illod at St. Michael's hospital in Stevens Point Wednesday morning at Mrs. Parmeter has been In poor health tor the past three Her husband and three children survive to mourn her death. Mrs. Parineter was Misa Cora Da- kins, daughter of A. R. Daklns. She was born in Portage county on Get 18, ]SS7. She married Ed Parmet years they have been resi- dents of Grand Rapids. M'rs. Parmeter' has "always been the. faithful ihother and her time and life was devoted to the service' of .the home. Three children landa, age 12; Ed, e (i; and Nina, age 4.- make up the family home. MrsA Parmeter's mother, Mrs. Julia Dakins of Stevens Point, her two sisters, Mrs. Eastman of Hancock, arid Mrs. Elton Glbbs also of Hancock, are in the cily for services. Funeral services will be held -at St. Peter's church at a. m: Friday., Services at the home will be held at a. m. TOWN OF ROCK GIRL PIES OF BURNS KiMTKi) ilV JIlS OIL -S5TOVK iiiff stoif' in Stanley followini; short wedding lour the youm; couple will return there to reside. The Tribune .extends to Mr. and Airs. Kot sincere wishes for a pros- perous wedded life. CITY CLERK FLOODED BY LICENSE SEEKERS IKK: OWNERS MAKE MAD DASH rot; TACS AFT- C. Gilkey. city clerk, was a jnsy man Wednesday. The new slate law regarding licensing of dogs goes nln vfTcri today and all doi; own- in flrand Kupids stormed his ollice yesterday lo secure licenses mil for liicir dogs. Any dog found without a slate fag rom n-iw on can be impounded by my police officer and Ihe owner of animal is subject to n fine and dog may be killed. MOTHER OF Zl F.S Julia Sch-.tltx. ap- ed'seventy, died r.t tho hospital here. She was the mother of twenty-four tuny nine of whom survive. There were Ihrcc sets of twins. The father died altnil fuur years ago. Adelia Kohl, 16-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Kph'j, town of Jtock. died in a hospital'ln Janesvillii Saturday from burns received at home ot her brolher-in-law and.sis lor on a farm at Suilivan, about 30 from .lanesvillc, three weeks preceding. The body was brought to he home of her parents and -the fun- eral was held from thc NasouVillo. Lutheran church Tuesday afternoon. The story ot the accident iu'.tlml her clothes caught fire while tilling an oil slove and thai, falling to ex- tinguish Hie names by rolling on the Hood, she ran lo the barn, where the (he family were at the lime. Her brolher-in-law responded lo her cries for help by throwing a blanket over her, which subdued the flames, but, tanned by the wind in her rutrfrom the house to the barn, they already had made such inroads upon her person that she sank Into uncon- sciousness. Medical aid wns hurried- ly summoned. Later she was taken to the hospital! n Jaiicsvlllc. NEBRASKA INDIANS MOTOR THRU A brand new louring car passed thru here today from Winncbago, Nebraska, carrying Jim Snaks and his wife. The Indians are iust toiir- ing arouml looking over thc coon- try. FIVE COACHES BURN-WRECK AT PjPESTONE I'ASSBNG-KKS KSCAI'E FROM KUKMNG- CARS WITH ONLY MINOR INJUHIKS-WASH OUT CAUSES WKKCK-r.RK.vr TIIERN TRAIN NO 52 (By Associated Prtfs) Pipcstone. Minn., July gi-r train No. 52 on the C.reat' Nor- them Railroad running between See Falls, S. D., ami St. Paul, liiiin., war, totally destroyed by flre early Thc seventy-live passengers abroad' escaped wilh only minor injuries. The fire started when the train ran, into a washout and a rail shot thru the floor of the baft-gagg ear and overturned a lamp. The lira spread to the other five coaches. were waitmf to started 4 CONVENTION RESUMED SESSIONS AT (By AMociated PteM) Auditorium, SanPranciMo, July 1 o'clock, Chairman Robin- son called tlie Democratic National Convention to order, for its fourth 4ay's session The gallertn filled eaily in expectation of a (howy flfht on thc platform issue. The came more slowly and at o'clock, the hour set for munini the fusion, the and delegate spaces aa usual enrjr- fartiallj r filled up with chatttfc memben. TM oand and organ the aa usual, entertained tfe things up. Besides the Ert- bassador Davis in qMMation, it understood that Sejtor data would be placed in nomination by Repre- sentative Floyd, one of the Virginia So far convention officials had been 
                            

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