Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Grand Rapids Daily Tribune Newspaper Archive: May 21, 1920 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Grand Rapids Daily Tribune

Location: Grand Rapids, Wisconsin

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Grand Rapids Daily Tribune (Newspaper) - May 21, 1920, Grand Rapids, Wisconsin                             DAILY T (FOKSIEKLY THE CKANI) RAPIDS LEADER) FIFTH YEAR NO. 20'J7 GRAND KAl'IDS, WISCONSIN, FRIDAY, MAY 21, 1920 1'KICE THKKK CENTS GROCERY MEN IN .CONFERENCE ON SITUATION PRICKS WITH TlfE STATE DIVISION OK MAUKKTS HEPKESENTATIVES; NEW YORK STORK MANAGERS UK I'll SIC TO ORDER JOBBERS HIGH PRICKS Milwaukee, Wis., May Milwaukee grocers predicting a heavy drop in the price of potatoes, dealers and shippers met at the. city hall to- day with representatives of'the State Division of Markets to discuss the present grading and shortage situa- tion in Wisconsin. Grocers Have re- ported the public has been so adverse to buying nine cents per pound [iota- toes that not more than one-third of the normal amount is beine? disposed of. With new potatoes 011 the market nt a higher rale, refusal to buy has been nearly unanimous and as the market continues to receive the new crop pi-ires are bound to collapse, grocers say. N. Y. Merchant's Si and New York, May and buyers of department stores here, in connection with the price cutting movement, stated that their establish- ments refused to purchase from job- bers until substantial reductions were made. The department stores claim to offer reductions of from fif- teen to fifty percent now demand wholesalers to make concessions to (hem. An ollicinl of one of the largest department stores, with branches in six cities, said: "We arc not buying future stock now and will not until manufacturers and wholesalers come down with their prices. Formerly we bought of furs on our initial purchase. So far we have refused to TO LET BRIDGE JOSKI'IIIXK SWJ-liNl-Y D1KS AKTKU A LINGERING ll.l.NKSS Josephim- Sweeney, the- ten year ok! daughter of Arllmr Sweeney die-d her home nt liiion Thursday M-iy at A. .M., afU.r illness. Tliu funeral services will be h--ld -it nine o' clock A. M. Saturday al the S. a. I'uler Paul's Catholic- Church Rev. Win. Redintc conduct-lit: the" services. Uurial will be in Hie Calvary Cemetery. STATIONS ALIKE STATK OKI'K'IAL SHU.'KSTS SI.MI. I-.MUTV IIKSKJX JIKXEI-'IT TO PUII- J.IC. In In tormathm sent lo iilm from the Stale Hoard nf Health Sec C; 1) FrltzsliiKor of I he Chamber of Com- merce has been given some eif (he dt- jlails that aro required and others that are suggested In lhe crmlun of a comfort station, sonio of which may apply lo Oriiiul Hapids when they exiihiining ihe they alsii erect a station in this city. While Iho Slate Board sent out a phiunpiut make suggestions that may be fol- lowed if the city desires.' One Ihe suggestions is (lint, a similarity be followed, and in regard to that .the Board says: Suggest. Design. "As lo uniform design ol' arcliilect- so that the traveling public at a u-lance may re-cugnixu Hiivso modern conveniences, permit ur, to slate that City of .Milwaukee workinr; purchase a single piece." this lino. You will appreci'il- .statements were made by oflicials of j however, ihat each community lo have a problem by itseif. other stores. Say it Is Artificial Some reprcsenlalivc wholesalers of wearing- apparel declared Uiey believ- ed the price culling movement to iit: artificial and uneconomic, asserting il has stimulated buying without a corre- sponding increase in production and f. reaction is bound to come. Meanwhile, merchants in lines olb- pears lo have However, it is the writer's opinion that the exterior of the comfort sta- llon should carry wiih u ;l scheme whirh by would sum- as; a Under. It was with the hope that many ol tho communities would do so that a station as sh would servo for Ihis purpose, 01 than food stuns continue to ofTer e roo sumld be of a b veduclions. 'I he reduction food orange color iile, preforabl announced yesterday when one of the-boelv or walls of I h tv ,1 comfon nan u- ly, the root slumld be of a buff -or" i, SCHOOLS CLOSE IN CITY TODAY Jlallci- of Choice. The Board adds thai Ihis matter of color scheme is nieincly a sugges- jlinn and can be carried out or  -idor the speech by Shoemaker bore land the advertising. Scout Executive last night, would have any effect em the i James F. Knapp said he would produce j oiilcomo or the drive for members, al-; a man al p. m. whereupon Ihe I though (l-.c speaker denounced the I speaker wound up his talk in a few Le-gion in general terms as being ua-1 minutes and left the stand. American. Shoemaker today said he did nol. conic here to attack the Legion and regretted h? had made any men- tion but said that he did it on account f being heckled by a member of thc Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Masloff leave I'd to Scout news of inteicsl. to the Legion. He said he believed in the Saturday for Tacoma and Seattle, attractive manner. The'nlition is and Portland and Cascade lished every month and carries rank and file of the Legion members. There has been no diflicuily here .....j between the Legion and labor organ- boys and which is prepared in very i ixulion as organizations. No group has used any influence to di.'courago the Locks, Ore.; for a visit friends and relatives. advertising from local merchants as he nowe, signing of new members in live city or community, from any impersonal In an interview this morning Dr. C. A. lioorman, who was chairman of the meeting, stated that the speaker said he did not come here lo knock the Am- Lcgion but only did so after bc; heckled. BOUGHT RESIDENCE -lames Bojric has closed a deal with Eminel McCarthy, buying a re- sidence from Mr. McCarthy on Oak street. Mr. Uogic will take posscss- i ion of the place immediately. BASS SEAS OPENS JDLYi little brighter and than a wolf. sharper featured ICIALISffl Indian representing the Winncbago tribes ovor this entire Indian District and from down in Nebraska arc ar- riving in Hie city today making prep. j ".ration to celebrate the Piuote of Mes- F. J. Wood: "They may have tho i wllch wi" bc on the i..... Mae-ant property along the river near the Green Hay railway bridge Satur- day According lo Leonard Walker and Chas. Ilimlslcy, both Win- ncbago Indians of this cily, the l-'esli- val -this spring will be a big one and south or thc representative.-; from practically every Lincoln school which I am clad U-' tribe will be here to help observe it nTesr for ibeii- USD and will furnish i Tho gentlemen wci'e completing of my vacant lots i[ (hoy wish." I. P. Wilier: "We arc glad to en- 'i- such lols as wis have if the; chll- I'l-n will iniiki; use of lltem." M'ni. I-'. P. Daly: "I have some lols' I HIP Daly Addition lot COMMISSION HAS DATE SI-71 HACK A MONTH TO CUT DOWN HEAVY INROADS ON SUPPLY OK GAME FISH rangcmonU with the city oflicials to- day lo gain permission to carry on the activities, which will be held all night Saturday. Go All Night According to the Messrs. Walker and Hindsley the activities will start up there about nine o'clock and will be carried on until twelve. The ceremony consists chiefly of beating tom-toms and carrying on their version of the religious ceremony. They will prob- ably stop about twelve o'clock for about ono hour r.nd then start again aro about one. The activities will probably be conducted the balance of the night. When asked if the affair would be Local bass fishermen who accustomed to spending their holiday on Memorial Buy casting along the lilly pads and racky shores for 'black j a one if bass which have to restrain their do- see tho ceremony sire for something more than a month this year County Clerk Sam Church states. The fishing season nony, iir. 'Walker'stated; that any people in the city who wished lo see the aiTaJr could do so by visiting the grounds. The fact that, it is the JUNK SIXTH SKT AS DATK FOR DEBATE BETWEEN ATTY. T. AND SHOE.ViAKKR Following the mass meeting held in Iho band stand on First Avenue South last night at which F. 11. Shoemaker of New London, was a speaker, a de- bate has been arranged and will in all probability take place in this city on June G next, when Ally. T. 'lira- j-.cau will uphold the in the question. Resolved, That Socialism is Un-American, and Mr. Shoemaker the negative. Armory lo be Used Armory will give the hall for the de- bate. Mayor C. K. Bricrc has consent- ed to act as chairman at the dcbat ins? on July 1st this year rather tlrm May 30th as has boon the hnbit the past few years. Change AIL Dates Tlr.-. season for pika anil pickerel has been changed, and instead fishing thorn over the annual' holiday the season will open June 1st, a month before the bass season. The changes have brought forth sor-.ic protest from, the fishermen thrououl thc stale who consider the month ol July and August not very favorable from a fisherman's viewpoint. June and September have, been considered thc ideal months for catching bass. Gives Opinion One authority on the question has given his opinion as follows: ''Opening day for bass was pushed back form May 2U to July 1 because the conservation commission believed ihat their hatching program could not maintain Ihe bass supply to its present standard. Mori; people arc- going fishing- than ever before, tacklt: methods aro being 'improve-! something had to bc done. "The general opinion is that the fishing in some of the lakes in the southern part csf Ihe state is gone by July 1 and anglers who fraque-i'l th-.'so lakes aro naturally worried. large crowd will witness it. The cere- mony was held last year in LaCrosse and has been held in other cities in Ihe district'previous! to that. Eat Buttons The affair which the Indians will hold here is called the Mescal Feast and gels its name from a Mescal But- ton which the Indians eat' during; the L'east. The buttons grow on the Mexi- can border and are said :to jpc veiy slrong, and after the pel-, son who eals it is'.said to .be affected similarly to the effects a drug will produce. The consumer is said to have' visions which are very pleasant to the mind after eating the buttons. ML TRAIN IS OFF TRACK' ENGINE AND TANK LEFT RAILS AT SWITCH DELAYING MAIL SEVERAL HOURS "It has been suggested that tin- stale- s-.l-.ould be- soiled and fishing be: I'-'.-rmitled in the- southern part on Msy 2'J with a later opening date for the northern waluy. Unfortunately I would not work out in because the spawning of bass de- pends on the temperature of water and that si not a mailer of latitude. H'iss spKwn in northern laUos that arc shallow before they do in tl'o-.e much farliier south that arc- deep and spring fed. The morning St. Paul train which arrives hero at a. m. from New- Lisbon left llu- rails at thc switch near Nekoosa, this morning, and arrived in this city about twelve o'clock, seven hours bchiml Hie scheduled time. No one was injured and Ihe train was placed back on the track by the train crow and section men, the assistance of thc wrecking crew not being nc'cos- i sary. Going Slow According to Agent Leonard Bender in this cily Hie train was traveling; very slowly when the engine left the th j n l ''Jy ,alv out' i m Julyl iaw th-.ni: coui-J have bc Thc debate was arranged al thc dial1 j lh-- circiimsl-.iicc-s longe of Shoemaker, who offered aljlhe iiK-cm-enionri- it makes Ihc meeting to mccl any speaker from j of us like catch V.'hco the city on the platform. II is under- bass. Evorv foss stood thai ll-.c regular rules governing j washing the experiment wit'i debates v.-iii-prevail at tin'.-: meeting, Expect Large Crowd There will undoubtedly be a large MAV crowd in attendance at this debate as Ally. Brazcau is well known for his from Iho'Nckoosa only con- i "loop" to Ihe main line was in process o and inslead of taking lo thc main line H j the engine straddled the rails. Several done j tengor telephoned to this city and had spite of their cars gel Ihcm or came up on the news part on Americanism having been identified'with thc Liberty Loan, selec- tive sen-ice draft board and having been State Senator. On thc other hand, Mr. Shoemaker is not especially well known in this cily bul he has declar- ed himself to bc as staunch an Amer- ican as any other man and being a socialist naturally has a following among local socialists. Washington. D. c.. May 21__Tho i louse War Comittce postponed ac- tion on the resolution giving soldier'.-, bill the House tomorrow, u was announced '.oday. hov.-o-.er. Ihat favorable ac- tion before the convening of Ihe street cas-. May Return on Time This noon In-.in coming fr'om the north passed thc morning train in the city, after which the northbound train, continued its journey.- Mr. Render slated that they had received to word as to whether thc train would continue the trip to Minocqua or stop at Wau- sau, which might mean that it would return to this city about on time to- night. House tomorrow was uncertain. Plans hour enrlinr -11 order i the bill before adjournment. THE WEATHER Fair tonight and Saturday, woi MUCH in   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication