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River Times: Monday, March 15, 1852 - Page 1

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   River Times (Newspaper) - March 15, 1852, Fort Winnebago, Wisconsin                               ;CH.V DELANY A.ND JAMES LA.NY YOLOE II. FOBT WLX-M'BAliU. MARCH Hi.: s u FOX A, RIVER TIMES u> M -it tu O.e ot tx- D i. L JL X Y E 3 rap I.' vv.'.i. i'.se lor j" 'j fvii 'jici 0 12 '.he A: s-.r-.-uni, i 1- J r: v, v> d.'-i-.-t'v :.cy ,.cy aiix me SATi.-: vr AUVElfl'ISIXC I .'.c. U-autii j Iy n a ".'lit: crove o! o.iks by its Conil-'arfor- to an open space where he uj Jjubt her: eh- uu foij of fjr. and .'j. Each insertion 00 ike a fr.sjh'.encJ a: j The vouthJul st-anaer irave a "dcs oi ih-i y ;j her.xulea forth to t'sc a atid that urou-iJ T.' ha: 1 .Ifiny e.lrC.'i !'i o h.s st-c.i. id for i "...re :ter Ti ti.e o ;ie iiJbL .1 in the it ou.sL-pe.! OJJIid H Then hi- sprang like column of lire and :liem. Not a war- to follow and as, a ILtli tt-'aS iMrJs un.ier C per yt- .tr. over 0 per liue. GO GO 00 with a ei.ijle oras- c.nd v, and Dean .1st raajing ttie rn :b.-..-hej.'I. as '.vitli loA ho i-.-j.a i opposite. _ a young- i sjanned that little abode, and resting there, a-ii-ci-id giri h ..iurk eyes gazed long and e.ir.aesdy on i Ltd uii' her fo.-e- j the sinless iziri. Perhaps his 1 ;a-; would wit ht-ad. looked arou.iJ j have lingered longer there, for there was a her, then sudden'v d.irted Lick. H- A T A I, E OF THE PRAIRIES. 1 of the would iiivt- w. i cf a stranger uien cauifnt i.j i ie fui-ni isfranjre la-ciaatioii in the eveso'" that beau- i week and sore frjsi i _ _ _ The old   Tiaci im fort 11 tWim f scious of the high estimation his master placed on his prowess and near by followed A larjfe and beautiful mastiff of a deep red. whose singular mould denoted the cross breed of the greyhound and English hull- '.log, combining the savage nature and great strength of the one. and the fleetness and beautiful symmetry of the other, r These, then, were the on.lv living- objects to be seen on all that vast and boundless waste. Sud- denly, the stranger drew in his rein, and ri- aing in his stirrups, gazed long and earnest- ly fur on tiie distant course the trail was leading him. while the noble steed beut his! J-'CAii ant! gMKid from off the rich herbage the bounteous earth here afforded; and Hector, the mastiff, wagging his tail in fond- ness, crouched down in the long- grass, and looked wistfully up into his young masters Pace, as to know the cause of this strange and -udden halt in their long weary inarch. While yet he was thus looking far into the distant horizon that bounded his view, with Urn painful anxiety of one who is dis appointed or doubtful of his way, the dog sprang suddenly up, and leaping forward deri from sight. A moment after, and frora a low deep ravine, but a short distance from xvhere the horseman rested, a large she wol! -sprang furiously out. with two whelps near- ly half grown, struggling fearfully with the dog. With one bound the youth had leaped from his saddle, and drawing from his bo- som a richly-mounted pistol, rushed madly forward to the fray. The fight was now terrific Hector had thrown the wolf on its back, holding her firmly by the throat; but the whelps with equal ferocity were gnash- ing his sides in a frightful manner. In vain the master raised his pistol to fire: the dan- cer was equal to the dog aa ths wolf if he did. yet the con test against such fearful odds could not long- be doubtful. In this extrem- ity he rushed recklessly among them, and raising his foot, with the heeT of his boot wild and fearful shriek burst forth from the lips of the Indian girl as the dark waters closed s look and quickening pulse for his safety. from the turmoil and strife of the busy world, he loved to linger here awhile amid the beauties of nature; to listen to the sweet melody of the singing birds, and watch the growing vine; to paddle the light canoe along the shores of that silent river, and decorate her bower with the flow- ers he plucked from off its banks. Mount- ing bis steed, he would often dash ai'ar off over the prairies, or wind his way through ui tilts luuiaii yu i a.s me UUIA waicis tiuaeu y over a moment he rose again and m that strange habitation, upon his grasped at the boat, but the stricken arm of tur3; suffering to agony, and not fell back powerless to his side, and with a lu heIP his mourniul condi- Ii i t tirtrtKiitfrKut i IA In I n i-ift ortA It o faint struggle he was last sinking, perhaps forever, when, with aloud cry and a plunge from the shore, Hector, his faithful dog. And now, as faint and bruised the boy the tano-led forest in search of some wild 1 .Xi u-. bade him conceal his form beneath the pile I "uw asnes 01 me o' :'SATHEB' oi'furs she had rested on. bv there, as if in slumber, the rude of the door parted, and a tall and powerful- looking Indian entered the cabin. Calmly he approached and. fervently saluting her SWI.XDUXG TUE lilt! arrival steamer with passen- gers frora California is followed by numer- ous new-spaper accounts of the most bare- faced swindling operations imaginable, in which gold buyers are the actors, and re- as she rose to meet him, he unloosened i i iruiaim waist a oeit ot wampum strung be arrival of the Empire dty the yet bleeding scalps ot her ta- dkt prove an A body of ten or twelve Calilorniana, who came on Trti r- v. ner Havana, went yesterday to tha The purport of strange v wit was too Miat am, their gold weighed ia order to plain to be misunderstood by the chieltam'- fmm ther's enemies, and laid them as au offer- ing at her feet. from imposition. They n of 'o the s'-'aWishiiiont of Joseph Hart, at 43, Barrack-street, First Municipality, daughter; and though it was agony to hide then> on t'ne the grief at work within her heart, she pre- pared to answer hisn calmly and finnly. Resting her dark on those of the chief- where -llKJy were a win, who stood with form erect, his long, lheir jj whjch bg h bony arms olded across his naked breast. Mint ht The brokers looked silently and motio.lesa awaiting her, she thatit required cleaning, and replied to him briefly in her own the knowing that they had language She could never accept cleansed their auriferous treasure, suit; she desired ever to live alone, as she was happy here in her little cabin, and told the brokers that they were welcome to came ploughing through the waters to his tion but that wild Indian she had now left him. perhaps to train of sad and painful thoughts came over his drooping spirits, and tears came down his rescue, and" seTzing him by the collar, the j the noble brute sustained him above the waters .-..r s surface untilThe girl padiiled quickly to his side, and with wonderful strength aided him into the canoe, and bore hira, though faint and much injured, safely to the shore. Ah! little he knew the strange and power- ful interest he had already awakened in the breast of that sinless, beautiful child of the forest! Perhaps her dark languishing eyes had never before rested their bright orbs on the face of any other than her own wild of the wilderness, and she knew of the white man but in the traditions of her tribe. brought relief, and his weary eye gradually closed to objects around, and many strange images came rising to his distracted vision There appeared before him a band of paint- ed warriors, their yet reeking with th tirns, and there was a captive in their midst bound hand and foot, naked and helpless. Already the chant of the death-song" was 0 game to grace her humble board. Thus tney that happy time; and day after day, evening after evening, the two wan- dered side by side, their eyes and hands a language telling they had not, knew not, words to She has hut one beloved near. Whose smile, though met on ruin's brink -Hatii power to make ruin The maiden was happy, happy now, in her innocence and beauty. Her guileless heart knew no wroug. Thut young Cho- ir murderous weapons I maukeman was the god of her worshipping, the blood of many vie- He not, breatned not, but its echo an- :_ _.-.i_. i swered from her loving breast, -flour after hour she would sit at his feet; and, gazing up into his proud features, play with the Fearful were ths curses, and deep root- ed revenge and undying hitsed. that had often broke forth when their name was mentioned from the pent up and smothered feelings of her parent, a warrior and a chief- tain of no little fame. Bat he was now 10 mo-e he had fallen j in battle with the Sioux en a late hunting uPon hls feared cheek awoke the sleeper; excursion, and every warrior and brave" opening his wearied eves there wis one of the tribe of which" he was the chief had bending over hia silent form, parting the gone forth to avenge his death while the from oil damp women 01 the village, eituate'd some iittie distance from the retired cabin of the maid- ui bLjij ucaku ouuj" vraa iit commenced-the council talk" had darkj curls that shaded Ins manly heard, and the poor stranger was to die 11 and pressing that hand to her beat- .....mg hearf, strive to tell, in her own soft mur- muring language, the happiness she felt. Yet the time was approaching when he A thousand yells rent the bright steel flashed fire was the torture hope had given way to the wildest despair, when a tread and a low whime from Hector, the mastiff, broke his horrid trunce. and the aoble brute crouched foniiiy down, piiiowing his head upon his master's heart. Again he slept, and at length the pressure of a soft hand must bid adieu to this wild, romantic life. ..w was nappy nere m ner nuie camn, ana much t t, w could never leave it for that of but But in this, as it afterwards turned out, some other maiden o the tribe more fitting thev reckoned without their host: for from hud one man's gold, which weighed at'the Mbt" over ninety ounces, they extracted by some art peculiar to themselves, no less than thirty ounces of black sand. A Californian one au honor. The chieftain drew himself quickly back. and gazed long and strangely on the girl TT t -IT i i i ui ujuon aaiJU. Haughtily he again raised In. arm; and. {with eyes wme what than pointing to the horrid witness of his vw- hora were possessed oS thought that he tory cruimed her his by; n2u, us now sole discovered something of a cheatin the oper- clneftam of his tribe; while Ins flashing eye ation. He. as he myt. stood aloof, and ever went sitsninoiiPiy searching round the lodgp and his hand felt significantly for the han- dle of his kuil'e. At that moment, the trap- pings of the stranger's steed met hia glance and. with a horria veil, CtiemauUeman he cried, his whole frame shaking with ter- rible passion Then with a curse and a bound, he sprung lo the frightened girl; ar.oi; a- occasion! of -iiini were fiillidg on a paper from the which ihe gold was shaken, a i hand would assist the sandy aci ........_ 1 by a tributary waif. And the'n, when the pa- was raised to pour the sand into a this hand would niso be put forth, and "the i of the bowl wtia theVeby amazinfflr and grasping her hands in his, dragged- her, facilitated. Others were then called to shrieking, from off that couch of furs; and. ere the cry had left her sinless lips, buried the bright steel to the hilt in her innocent heart! lice the tnovemeof8 of ,he of the at pretty much at an end, and the united losses of the Californwns by the mysteriously ex- -Mercy, villain, .houtel the j tracted sand, (the weight of which was ta It- youth, as, with one bound, he sprang from his concealment: and seizing the savage en lrorn the 'nfst of the> ,d said to he between and 31000. On an and leave that sweet and lovelier form erer crossed his path. de features, while the big tears came CHAPTER IV. 1 thp love of WQiti-in is known To he a lovely and a fearful thing; death-kadi echoing far over the prairies and, with one terntic yell, he leaped hign j into the air. as the lilood spouted a torrent j !rom his iorehead then fell heavily to 1 the floor a lifeless corpse. j And there, within his circling arms, the j fair young being, in the pur of the a.restod Il3. anj for v_ be Csam1acd" to-day" _ _ _ __ ._ ______ _.__ ____ _ The mother of the maiden had been kill- ed him up. and clasping his feebie arms in an p.ttaMt W a nf around her BecK. drewthat gentle to ed in an beandow mprnted 0 summ time. BYMOS. j It was the lovliest evening of ail that _ SIXQULAR Discovuflr. Ccnquctt of A sclif.me of the Det- he cried, gazing on ot' the mast and snger for the _ j __ _ ___ t. ,i i hinah thp nrnr   iedin her singular garb the object of her. unfold and. preying her to hi- som- At iaid her down, that itnck- _ lllltwri.llice 01 re. a tall and powerful Indian whose i visit- and that H was for her assistance the tears, 'scalding tears, dropped down like en one. jjenUy mere soltly as a young moth- the on the battle-field had won him "ad absented herself from his j rain from his youthful cheek, and he wept i Uaited moment'he was hurled to'tne ground s'rug-; ihe rank he. he" bllt Bpfore erous. curwnng. and revengeful. There; AI had been dark surmises that he kuew more 'to "le _ _ _ of the death of the father of the maiden S0n3e dfi5cl and roots in an earthen spell that bound her there, suddenly------., but so much was he Pot cf placed or. a fire that burned on the hushed, quiet without a cry. a wun Borgo. being then in Fnrk iri a to hil im of s h Alnerica S He gling for life with his savage foe. the wolf bad inflicted more than one or two, alight wounds, his faithful mastiff raughth.-rbvthe throat, and tearing her i than _ he enow to tell; from what r oun'jeo on me iovereignty of the tit lltl UV IIIC O.IIU I.CU.1.I11L I1CI I t J T off him. in a few moments finished i aredd. none uared the fatal shot had left of life, while the, withcut tLi whdps fled sp.felv frorr the scene nf strife. Another 'lour, and the horsem.an was far from the scene of the late tragic adventure. yet still pursuing his lonely way over the same boundless prairie. But often would. he check steed, and look long and anx-1 ol fD'jsly around, and far awav ;n thedlrscthn maiden loved him had never laved any but the departed, who gave her birtii: r.-t -jp.plea-, so and .'ou.1. that the warm MooJ sant beverage, which she motioned him to, went chilling through' every vein. A mo- ioiija. prepared for fi'fr inmite. <4 fcui rv Ikll lone Ian. tio7 .hat as hr all iai from that cabin and its li.cleu ,ora it ,Btiln, -fdisjemia innova- r at a distance, by their writings and by the All that long and eventiul night the In- of their eximple. a poison of c; couM r.ot bo -jasa- i memory.a presence at The cabin. the young sprang to his fset; and. rev lintio-i hvJ m origin n the United thu already his path, a- i; expecting mcrncr.tarily SDtne ofject to meet his eye yet visible. 'ing. a Email pocket compa-A. and mnHr- its face for pome with grekt And now. was a turae :R d.-rccuoc ag they left their little craft, it i vei. Bigj.w tj Ijjn uixjii i -1-- and artless one. sweet forward iaTear ar.d pity. she. befirc ilnAl her _ 'hat straneer. as he leaned against I H agfd oak growing there for Ills lUiiiiV itdlM m uef wn.i ,t those dini aoa IU.ITOVMI whenever he bu; spoke or movei Aod did love him. stranger yo-jth, wildly around, fearfully f. :rom .'Air. an V-v.l M W. ...J _, V f I. where now might traceU the ouiune of hl9 range of low timber, etretf' ir fif lie r' Le relAt-d in ha but reiurufij; the ne hagjfird K-a-, turei; and p'jin'ing to the wigwam near. an urjcd hifn forward on path trial .e.l ic ,u her tuni oo, wt side a flew fonJ And, parent to returning warrior-; an 1 that o! r p. ihe -mJ the o! 1 wll-l tumult; sail, as the rfiornirjii broke roouii'ed warriors saen tlving over Uie vuat i.tr ;ia every direction, in hot h.ii i3.j 1 .lioy the oi ths presenca lhc prerwh the distant horizon 
                            

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