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Fond Du Lac Daily Commonwealth: Wednesday, August 13, 1913 - Page 1

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   Daily Commonwealth, The (Newspaper) - August 13, 1913, Fond Du Lac, Wisconsin                                PHONE NUMBERS. Job Printing Department-----54 Adv. and Editorial Room Did you ever notice how many people watch for classified ads? The total would surprise That's why the ads are so ef- fective. VOL. XL111, NO. 3O1 FOND DU LA.C, WISCONSIN, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, PRICK TWO CIS.M TS SULZER IMPEACHED; HE RESISTS REMOVAL Acting Governor Martin Glynn May Call State Guard to Remove Deposed Predecessor From Executive Office-Sulzer to Appeal WIFE TAKES BLAME TO SHIELD SULZER Mrs. Sulzer Makes Formal Statement that She Con- verted Campaign Funds-Says Morgan of Frawley Committee Knew About it ljy the I'mU'd Puss Associations. Albany, N. Y., Aug.. com- mittee appointed by the assembly to prepare articles of impeachment against Governor William Sulzer peared at the capital at noon bring- ing with them the charges which they were prepared to give to tlie senate after the upper house con- vened. As soon as tlie notification commit- tee informs the senate of the im- peachment the articles will be filed, i The legislature will not meet till i 0 clock this afternoon it was tin-1 nounced at 1 P. M. May Have Rival Governors. Albany, X Y., Aug. the state of New York, might have two rival governors shortly alter the senate met to receive from the as- sembly the articles of impeachment against Governor Sulzer was thought liketv today. Immediately after tiie convening of the senate the notifica- tion committee was ready to serve notice that the assembly at had impeached the governor by a vote 01 79 to The committee of five named to prepaie articles of impeach- ments were ready to file their (barges at once and tlie receipt bv the senate automatically would sus- pend Snlyer from office. That the governor would submit tamely to what his friends call "legis- lative lynch law" is thought unlikely. is expected to resist suspen- sion and to continue to occupy his executive oflice. Lieutenant Governor Martin Glynn, of Albany, will auto- matically become acting governor' FEAR FOR VALIDITY OF TARIFF BILL Clayton's Appointment Raises Serious Obstacle with tlie suspension of Sulzer and should Sulzer refuse to give way he may call the state guard to protest his office. Gov. William Sulzer. Various attempts were made by Tammany men today to explain a visit of Cnaiiman FAiwley of the Continued on page two. FIVE JOY RIDERS COME TO GRIEF Brandon Men Have Accident at Wau- Two Unhurt is Wrecked. i'jiniil lo I'.nh Common we.ill h. I Waupnn, Wis, Aug. SENATE LEADERS ARE AT ODDS in IMA city Tuesday ___......._ evening, to attend tl.e performance of "The Th ef" at the Dav- idson, started on a joy ride I lor Fond du Lac in their Juto after tlie about At the bridge on Fond du Lac I street there is a sharp turn onto the WARN AMERICANS TO LEAVE MEXICO U. S. Wants Citizens Out of Dan- ger if Embargo is Raised WAR SHIPS TO AID IN WORK Movement of Americans from Mexico Gives U. S. Advantage in Case Embargo on Arms is Raised. By the Crated Pross Associations. Washington, D. C., Aug.- icans are fleeing from Mexico. Dis- patches prove this. As a result this government is securing a decided ad- vantage. Should the mission of John bind fail, the embargo on arms to insurgents can be removed without fear of bloody reprisals on innocent Americans. If bind fails and the em- bargo is removed so the rival factions can settle their dilferences this gov- ernment wants Americans out ot Mexico. So the consular represent- atives have been directed to persuade all those not having interests hold- ing to leave. The greatest fleet of warships on the east and west coasts are to aid in the work and it will be nearly completed before Lirid can tell what measure of success is to greet his efforts. The only word received trom Lind today was that everything was pro- ceeding satisfactorily. His visit to the minister oi foreign relations was purely formal. Lind will interview leading Mexicans and use them as much as possible. As his instructions are elastic he will not report till something definite has been accomplished. MULHALL FALLS ILL PRETTY NEAR SUPPER TIME! HOUSE HALTS TO LET STRICKEN WITNESS REGAIN STRENGTH. Confessed Lobbyist Breaks Down After Testifying for Two Hours. Unlffss Clayton's Title Is Fixed His Vote on Tariff Bill Might En- danger Measure. By the I'nitnl Tress Associations Washington, C-, Aug. ious obstacles, including one invoh- ing the validity of tariff legislation, were reported to the senate today, following the appointment of Hen.'v D. Clayton to fill the seat of Senator nson. Democratic and republican Ecn.ite leaders are at odds over the validity tlu appointment. Senator Dillmg- ranking republican on the judi- ciary committee stated an objection would be made. Democratic senators pointed out that the legality of the tariff bill might be attacked in court and the bill annulled if Clayton should vote without his titla being fixed and tlie bill become a law by a majority of one vote. Clayton Named New Senator. Montgomery, Ala., Aug. D. Clayton, member of congress from the Third district of Alabama, was named by Governor O'Neal ae United States senator to .fill the vacancy caused by the death of Senator Joseph F. Johnston. Mr. Clayton said he would leave at once for Washington to present his credentials and would not resign his seat in the house until after he is seat- ed in the senate. Washington, Aug. was expressed by Democratic leaders of the senate last night when they learned that Governor O'Neal had dis- regarded their advice and had appoint- ed Representative Clayton to the sen- ate without express authority from the Alabama legislature. "It is my opinion that Mr. Clayton will not be said Senator Over- man, acting chairman of the Judiciary committee, members of the'judi- ciary committee and a majority of the lawyers of the senate were of the opinion that'the seventeenth amend- ment to the Constitution does not give governor authority to appoint a sena- tor except under express directions from the legislature. bridge, and another as the road es the bridge. Apparently the joj riders liad too great speed for they hit the s de ol th? budge, smash- ing a lamp, bending the axle, an.l tearing the bridge railing. Then in an endeavor to straighten they swung to the other side and the rear wheels caught one being toin off and the machine jammed across rhe bridge. Two of the men, Marty .Tenson, Brandon buttermaker and M. Palmer, a clerK, were thrown out .lenson sustained a fractured left siionlder blade and a sprained neck. Palmer was badly bruised and his neck sprained Mr. Kobeal, was not thrown out but received a sprained back. The others were not hurt and their names were not ascertainel. A machine from a garage took the men to their homes and the wrecked auto lies in the dilch where it fell, and "Is an object of interest to manv. MAYOR GOODLAND PUTS LiD ON SUNDAY CABARETS. Wis., Aug. Wal- ter S. Goodjand has issued an order 'barring all cabaret singing in Racine saloons and cafes on Sunday. Saloon WARRINGTON GIRL CONTINUES STORY Tells of the Arrival of the Quartet at Diggs Introduced Her as His Wife. By Hip I'mti'il I'n-f-s Assoouiiions. San Francisco. Cal., ing up the story of- her relations with Manry Diggs where she was inter- rupted at yesterday's adjoin nment, Miss Marsha Warrington resumed her testimony in the Diggs white slave trial today. She sketched the events precedi ig the arrival of herself, Diggs, Camin- etti and Miss Morris at Reno, and then said: "After our arrival at Ueno we went to the Riverside hotel where Digga and I occupied one room, Comir.etti and Miss Norris another. "Diggs introduced me as his wife to a real estate dealer when we were looking for a bungalow." men claim that they v ill s op base- !ball, motion picture houses, vamlc- 'vllle, picnics, etc., on the Sabbalh. Washington Aug M. Mulhall became ill while testifying be- fore the lobby investigating commit- tee Of the house, which adjoinned un- til Thursday to allow him to recuper- ate. Meantime James A Emery, coun'bel for the National Association of Manufacturers, told the senate's lobby investigating conimiteo what Mulhall's duties were while be was employed as lobbyist and political campaigner for the association. Mulhall was on the stand two hours before he announced that he was worn out and could not pioceed "Mulhall kept me supplied with copies of bills and public documents in relation to the1 work here, and got information of the status ot legisla- tion in which we were Mr. Emory testified. "In this work he gathered information and learned the of members of congress. He made inquiries about hearings and re- quested an opportunity for me to ap- pear." Mr. Emery denied that Henry Xeal and Harry Parker, employed at the capitol, had been in the pay of the manufacturers He testified that he did draw one check foi sent it to Mulhall and told him to divide it be- tween Neal and Parker, "merely to pay for the many courtesies they per- formed for our members you ever make; any payments to Mulhall for McMichacP" asked the attorney tor the "Yes." said the witness 'It never exceeded a month, and'it termina- ted when 1 left for Europe in 1910" The payments were made, be said, for services in getting bills and docu- ments and for courtesies Mr Emery denied Mulhall's story that Repiesentative Jenkins of Wis- consin had promised that if le-elected he would see that a man satisfactorj to thp mmuifacturers would go on the house judiciary committee E.X T R A BALL PLAYER HURT EXTRA G. F. FINGER HEADS BADGER MERCHANTS 'SEVENTEEN TEAMS IN COMPETITION Elected President of Wisconsin Merchants Association TWO RIVERS GETS 1914 MEET Greatest Exhibition Ever Held at K. T, Conclave PRIZE IS AT STAKE Magnificent Trophies to be Awarded Winners in Knight Templar Com- petitive Drill. Thirteenth Convention of Badger Merchants Closed This Afternoon with Annual Election. H> t lU' I lllU'cl AsMM'Klllolls. Hacine, Wis., Aug. thir- teenth annual state onven'ion ol the Wisconsin Hetail Merchants' Associa- tion came to a c-lose this afternoon by choosing Two Rivers as tlie con- vention city for HH4 and the of the following officers: K Firmer, Fond du Lac. Kirs'. Vice if. Robin- son, Kenosha. Second Vice President -K. N. Fish. Appleton. 'i'. Daveron. Milwau- kee. POWER PLANT BURNED CITY IN DARKNESS Piairie du Cliien, Wis., Aug. 'Fire Tuesday night the power plant ol the Prairie City IClec- tric companv. Part of the machinery was in operation when the tire broke out in the boiler room, suppnscdlv from spontaneous combustion Lack of water pressure due .to air in the water m.iius tor a tew minutes gave tlie flames great' headway. The damage is iis.oou. with insur ance of The is in dark- ness until tempoiary repairs can be made. eather Forecast I'nsettled weather with probably j thunderstorms tonight or Tliursdaj. I Warmer tonight and east portion Thin iHd.ij. Model ale winds, niosllv j southerly. I Temperature tc.r the 2! houis cnd- -rg at A. M M.iv .uigusl 77 57 August Kl, I -2 61 At A M. '.3. Madison Fielder Sustained Wounds on Head When Spiked as He Was Sliding 1or the Plate. "Harpy" Harrison, tielder for the llaaison   rnu.'il I'M-SS Associations. Duluth, Minn., Aug. of the total of twenty-three persons tiirown into the water were drowned in St. Louis bay on the Superior side the flimsy top used for seats on the launch Du Plaise gave way. All the passengers were irom Su- perior except Miss Goldstein. Six- teen of tlie party were picked up by tugs and govemmem launches. The tug. St. Claire, came up behind the launch, running at high speed and causing au immense swell. The Du Plaise was caught in the swell and the rocking threw the passengers to one side c ac.Miig the cam as to break and throwing the passengers into the water. EXTRA BATTLE FRONT IS SHAKEN UP Hogan Shifts His Line of Attack Today DEFENSE IS ALSO CHANGED evperience fal's down when tries to teach a fool CLAYTON AMBITIOUS TO BE -A SENATOR? Lippold Is Shifted Back Into Infieid Heads the Bat- ting List. With a view of putting to route the batting jinx that has followed Ihf- Fond du Lac club in th3 last few Maity Hogan today put his players into a hat, shuffled them up and then fired them into the battlfa with an entirely new batting Imeup. Kittle Jack Sheehan is boosted to (he top, then comes Holt, then Wolfe .ind the other plajirs follow down in more or less slufteii orner. In" the defense game, Marty has pulled Lippold in from right to take his old position at second, while sillier Overtoil or Scholl will work n the right garden. Because of Scholl's hitting ability there was a -.ne-aking suspicion that he was due 'or the place. Ilogan got word from Eddie Price this moraing and the little fellow be on the job Friday. There is an oil-day on Thursday, the players o take a trip to Calumet Harbor for the day Fishing, boating, etc., will >e the older of affairs. Batteries Are Named. The- batteries for this afternoon's 4amr Fond and Mueller. and Weeks. The score at the end of the seventh inning wa-- Fond du Lac... 0000120 Madison 1 0 2 0 0 0 3 GIVE WARNING OF BIG CAR SHORTAGE Lumber Men Rush Orders Corn Crop Short But Wheat Yield 22 Roads Give Warning. tlio t'nitii! I'jvj-j AssiK i.itmns. St. Louis, Mo, Au A big car ishortage that mav be a repetition of that of it. imnpnding, according lo warning-; oi' twenty-two railroads. the cum crop 's not up to the. iverage, jepuith from the wheat nates indic.iie the wheat s Lumber companies are making strenuous rtUrts to move their or-, before the stringency becomes -li irn LOOKS LIKE COALITION SAYS N. A. M. MAN Representative Clayton. Among those mo.'t prominently mentioned as (ho successor of. Sen- ator Johnston of A al ama is Repre- (-illative chairman of the bouse jud committee It is ex- pected that Representative llobson will trj for the senatorship, running 01. a woman suffrage, prohilnt'on ticket. The conservatives are look- ins for the strongest man to oppose bun, and are said to look most fa- vorably upon He has resentcd his district in congress since My tin- I'niled Pn-hs. A.-Jsooi.itliMis Indianapolis, Ind.. Aug. 13 the X. A. M. has done "nothing it shou'd not have clone and v. ill continue' its work in the future" was the state- ment of D. M. Parry, former presi- dent of the Manufacturers associa- tion who is home today much dis- iM'stcd with the Mulhall inquiry. said "it appears to us that there might be a coalition between icprosentat ves of labor and the dem- j oeratic administration, to break ap our organization." Parry will re- j trrn to Washington Monday and tes- 1 tify. I A girl doesn't necessarily throw herself at a young man just because she tossed her hoa.l at him. I It is oas or to mako friends than (it Is lo hold them.   

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