Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Fond Du Lac Daily Commonwealth Newspaper Archive: March 20, 1913 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Fond Du Lac Daily Commonwealth

Location: Fond Du Lac, Wisconsin

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for Liking us on Facebook

   Daily Commonwealth, The (Newspaper) - March 20, 1913, Fond Du Lac, Wisconsin                               PHONE NUMBERS. AJjfy. Editorial Room 54 54 356 Buy it Fond II will pay yeuAo your local merchants. VOL. FOND DU WISCONSIN. MARCH 191 a PRICE TWO CENTS EATON'S WIDOW HELD FOR MURDER Climax Comes in Story of Rear Admiral's Death PRISONER PLEADS NOT GUILTY Mrs. Joseph G. Charged with Murder Held Without Postponed. Hy fnii.-.l Prr--i Mass. long d climax M-arch siory nf the ..nildcn di-nh of Itear Admlr.il Joseph C. his hasty tr.irial absolutely no naval honors and the subsequent Investigation Into his came today with the arrest of his charged wih his murder. Mrs. pleadej not guilty when arraigned before Pratt. A mm lunation till March 2S was ordered. Klie was held without bail. DIRECT ELECTION NEARLY RATIFIED Only Four More States Needed to Complete List IT MEANS MUCH TO ILLINOIS Leaders Assert Voters Soon Will be in Position to Say Who Shall Wear Two Togas. Washington. March the ratification of only four states remain- ing to assure the adoption of a constl tutlonal amendment for the direct election of speculation was heard at the capltol of the amend upon the senatorial contests In Illinois. At present two senatorial vacancies exist In but the legislature has been deadlocked many People May Elect The consensus of opinion was that the ratification of the amendment by four more states and the subsequent proclamation by the secretary of elate that the amendment had been adopted would deprive the Illinois legislature power to elect Tbe se- lection then would be made under the terms of the This requires that when vacancies occur such as exist lu IlllooU'the governor of the slate shall Issue writs lor an election at polls to fill such va- cancies. U Is that the legislature may empower the gov- ernor to make temporary appoint- meii'.s until the people fill tbs va- caocles by election. Senator the new chairman of t'le senate committee on privileges ud was one who hUd general opinion. Senator I'oindeiter of Washington was another. 32 Favor Dlrsct Vote. To date the offlclRl records of the state department show that 21 states have reported favorable action on tbe amendment and none against It records show that 32 siatee have acted and none hove gone on record definitely as opposed to It. The states which have been reported as having acted favorably SOLDIERS GUARD BODY OF THE KING TO HELP MAKE TARIFF LAW Funeral Awaits Taking of Oath by His Successor the President Will Have Hand Framing Legislation SCHINAS REMAINS UNMOVED Gruelling Examination Falls to Make Assassin Admit He Was Ing for Others. Act. lly tin- rnlu-.l Press As-.ocl.itl.mt. Salcnik.1. March Ixxly of the murdered King George of Greoc.1 loday lay in slate In ihe main chom- ber of the guarded sold- iers. awaiting completion of funeral arrangements. I'rinec Nicholas announced that ar- rangements would not be completed till after the oath had been admin- istered to Constantine tomor- row. The ceremony of removing the king's body fiom the hospital to the palace was as simple as it was im- pressive. After the embalming the' body was placed on a plain military and carried through Ihe streets. 1'rlnce Nicholas and soldier aides to the king taking turns in car- rying ihe stretcher. The procession passed over the spot where the as- fatal bullet had been fired. In the pioresslon were Greek sol- diers in high dip- lomats in brilliant dress. Moslems and -lews. all solemn and weeping. At the palace a soldier guard was set and the public allowed to view the body. Schinas Unmoved by Examination. Alexo Schinas. the des- pite Ilie most gruelling has not yet admitted that he acted for any or had any as- sistants. Body Removed to Palace. The body of the lato King George of Greece was embalmed and removed from the hospital to the palace on a stretcher borne by his son. Prince and several superior officers of the Greek army. The stretcher was followed by a strangely diversified pro- cession couslstlng of regular troops in their campaign officers In brilliant civilians. Mussulmans and peo- ples of the various Balkan races In a kaleidoscopic variety of costumes. On arrival at the military rendered. The body was placed on a bier In the malu chamber and the Greek Metropolitan offered prayer. As the civil and military au- thorities flled past many of them burst Into tears. A guard of honor consisting of Greek captains and the latter continually chanting will be stationed around tho body until It Is removed for burial. New King Addresses Army. Greece. March 20. r'rom the Fortress of which he re- cently captured from the Turks. King Consinntina addressed his first mes- sage to the Greek army. It was outrage on the sacred person of King George depilves us of our leader at a moment very critical for the Hellenic nation. 1 am called by Providence lo succeed my never-to-be forgotten father on tbo throne over which he so long shed luster and honor. bring this news to the knowledge March of a conference with Senator JlfflmotJo. President Wilson berved no- lea ou the leaders of the next con- that be Intends to have a hand D tha framing of tariff legislation to he end thpt be may be lu accord with congress vrhen the work for which tho special session has been called sball be completed. Mr. Simmons Is chairman of the nuance committee which will tariff legislation lu the upper bouse. The president told him that he White House expects to be kept nformed about the. progress of the ochedules as they are made up and hat all Important tariff makers are expected to make frequent visits to he legislative offices. Purpose Is Harmony. The president's purpose Is har- mony. Having called congress for the purpose of making u tariff ha neaus that It shall make one which le can approve. He remembers that Mr. Taft called a tariff making ses- sion and vetoed the bill that came through their ler.blatures are as fol- of my to which I devoted j my whole life and to unsuccess- I ful urid successful wcrs have Indls N-w Vork. Norlh Carolina. Minneso- ta. Massachusetts. Michigan. Idaho. Washington. Wyom lug. Illinois. Wisconsin. Kansas. Ver- mont. New Hampshire. South Dakota. Ohio. Indiana. Missouri. Maine. West Virginia. Arkansas. Nebraska. Iowa. New Mexico. North Dakota. Seven Legislatures In Session. Ttfe legislatures of Pennsylvania Connecticut. Ithodo bland. New Jer Delaware. Tennesses end Utah m.- are In session. The lower housej j Madison. March Pennsylvania. New Jersey. Del iware j a tOu farm in and Rhode Island have approved the j with the stale prison al while ihe senate In Utah so the and Delaware have opposed It. Tnere moro nearly se solubly bound me. I declare to U lhal marching always at Us I will never cease to roncentniie my solici- tude on my land and sea wnose glorious havo brought renown to our DECLARES PRISON IN NEED OF FARM in SERVES NOTICE ON LEADERS lays White House Must be Kept In- formed About Pur- pose- is Harmony. from It. Ho also remembers what tappened to Mr. Taft shortly there- after. Senator Simmons reported the re- sult of the conference to his commit- tee Seuators Smith of Williams of Mississippi and Hughes of New Jersey. will be satisfactory tariff re- Senator Simmons said after- ward. places will be made smooth by frequent conferences. The president will know what Is going on both committees and will act as mediator In case of any Must Originate In House. j agreed to The new of must un- Saturday. der the Constitution originate In the house. .The members of ihe ways and means committee that bas been se- lected by the Democratic caucuses are now not as a but as a body of men who will com- prise the next ways and means com- mittee to frame the bill. When re- WATCHING GIVES 10 MINUTES BRYAN'S AID TO WAGE PROBERS Illinois Senate Committee Allotted Small Part of President's Busy Day Saturday. I'nili-il Washington. C. March ident Wilson is to U-arii next Satur- day the delails of the relationship of low wages for women to the white trallic. tho necessity for mini- mum wage whether he should call a conference of governors and ask cooperation beuvcen states in legislation along those and whether congress- should el.act a min- imum wago law. Lieutenant. Governor O'Hara of II- llnois sent a messenger here to say his committee wanted to discuss the subject with tho president. Me was that al the present time Wilson could not give an extended hearing to the visitors. The president finally give them ten minutes ported to the bouse It will. If go to the senate for consideration and will then- to the Uenale committee finance. For conveni- ence this already at work upon the suggestions that have thus far come from the house tariff makers and will be ready for action when the time comes. Tbls scheme of systematizing will shorten the coming session by n month or more. The president mean- while will be In a position to know In advance Just how far he will approve the changes that are to be made and will be able to dictate exactly the kind of a tariff he wauls. MILITANTS START FIRE Destroy Country Residence of Lady White. Widow of Hero of Lady- Placards. By the United Press Associations. London. March started by suffragettes. lodaV dcs- iroyed an unoccupied country home at Kngle.fleld ouncd by Lady widow of Sir George White the ro of l.adysmiih In the lioer The firo caused a loss of The police left in no doubt to who sinned the fire. Posted about the house were signs. throwing our comrades into POST Assistant Secretary of State Disap- proves of Administration's Chi- nese Policy. Uy tin- fnlu-cl I'rr.-s D. March assistant -secre- tary of today resigned because of the new administration's Chinese and his resignation was im- mediately accepted by President son. Wilson was assistant secretary un- der Knox mid was in be held until Secretary of State Ilryan selected his successor. Give Up Chinese Loan. New York. March the re- sult of the announcement made by President Wilson that the United States under his administration would no longer be a party to the pow- er which has been striving to arrange a loan to as announcement made at the offices of J. P. Morgan Co. In be- half of the American banking group that deference to the policy of Pres- ident Wilson the entire American banking group has withdrawn com- pletely from the Chinese loan negotia- tions and has so advised the Euro pom and Japanese FORMAL CEREMONY SCHINAS WAS A TO INSTALL KING Constantine Will Take Oath Office Tomorrow of DAVENPORT King George's Assassin Livedfl Many Years in America CORONATION IN SIX MONTHS WENT HOME SIX MONTHS AGO Constantine Became King Automati- cally When Father But For- malities are Observed. lly I he I'nllnl I'rcs Athens. March Constantino arrived today and It was a-r.inged for him formally 10 take Uie oath tomorrow in the chamber of deputies. Constantine in effect became king automatically when his father but the formalities remain to he ob- served. The Council of ministers proclaimed him king and will take the oath Six months hence he will be crowned at a formal coronation. That function will not occur till the expiration of the half yoar per- iod of ordered by the council. Greek Anarchist was in Business Iowa Because of His Revolutionary Ideas. the fnil il I'rrss latloIIS. III.. March 20. AlekoJ I EXTRA EXPLOSION KILLS SCORES ARE INJURED j i he rniied IV.--1 Medicine Alberta. I.ni March 2ft.-- Ueviscd figures indicate Uial live IK.T- rons were killed and ten seriously in- jurid in the explosion that last night demolished the Malcolm Canning com pany's plant here. Scores sustained minor injuries. SENDS MESSAGE OF CONDOLENCE Uy Ihr- mili'il I'n-SH A-om-lalimis. Kng.. March of commons this afternoon voieil .111 expression of eondoUncc lo King George and Queen Mother Alexandii.i for Ihe assa-iination of their unele and brotlnr. King George of HAS TWO WIVES LOVES 'EM BOTH David Accidental Awaits Judge's Decision as to Which Wife to Accept. the t'niti-il Props Associations. hid March ing with his second wife and six months old child while his first wife and boy of six years who had travel from Kussia lo find him are being eared for by David Mander. an accidental awaits the decision of Police Judge Collins as to whidi wife he is finally to accept. love boih women and 1 love my ho said. Mander married sfdiiul lime whi'ii he believed wiff dead. Forecast is a possibility of both of these bodies reconsidering their votes before ad- j jouriuiienl. The lu Florl- j da meets next month at.d tbxt of I Georgia In while flve more iegls- I laiures In states which have yet ticted meet In 1914 and Alabama lu 1915. The favorable action of only four more stales Is necessary to institution would elf-supporting was ad- be voialcd uy Miss a member of tiie stale board of con- before the assembly commit lee on state affairs yintcrday afternoon. She said that there were about acres of land used in connection with i the piison the present time. Sev- j eral bills under lonsidcratlon _ bv thtj committee relating to prison porate the amendment In the ConstL j d tutlon i ____ ONE DEAD IN TRAIN CRASH'. DARLINGTON FARMER KILLED BY TRAIN Chicago A Eatttrn Illinois Express _______ Goet Through Open With FrdgHt. Marlon. 111.. March Mar McDonald. 30. a farmer living tin mgli was H. killed when was Injured so badly he will by an east bound freight on lose both legs. If not his and j'he Milwaukee road tod-jy. others were Injured an the resuli of i Chicago Eastern Illinois passenger train No. 120 going through an open switch near Johnrton station and crashing Into the engine of a local freight train. j Tbe Injured men were taken on a 1'nilc'1 rrtfs LOOK FOR TROUBLE Police Reserves Ordered Prepared for Duty in Anticipation of Switch- men's Strike. Uy tin- flitted Press III.. March re- serves in South Cl-icago and other dlstriels where there are railroad were ordered to prepare for iluty today anticipation of a strike of switchmen employed in rds of nineteen -roads entering Chi- cago. j Representatives of tin- .switchmen i and roads went iiKo conference to- j day. The railroads night at thp demand of the men for tirncj and a half for over ime and Sundays' and holidays. A. K. Whitney. tho I .-uitdimi-n said the men miulii j late this tyinu- tip tiafficl to the east and nonliwcst if demands are not granted. Fair snow night. Colder v. il east portion to- ll cold wave east portion. Fridaj. geneialiy fair. Cold er souilio'st portion. Brisk to hiuli northwest lo north Temperitinc for Ihe L'l hours end ing at A M March I'lin March 20. H'12 Al A. M.. Min HARVESTER CO. RAISES GIRLS' PAY FRIEDMANN BREAKS RULEJ9FJILENCE Urges Tuberculosis Sufferers to Stay in Homes PATHETIC SCENES ENACTED Scientist's Way Halted by Throngs of Sufferers Begging Powerless to Help. Minimum Wage of Affects 800 Em- ployes of International Harvester Company. II.'- I'n.tiil AN-iOrkltinns. Cluc.igo. III.. March 2u.- Kight hundred girl employes of the Inter- national r Company will be raised lo a beginning Mon- to President Cyrus The inert ase comes on Ihe heels of tn DEATH COMES TO WOULD-BE SUICIDE Eptclal train to the hospital at ML When two women talk it's a dia- when a woman and her bus- baud converse it's a monologue. Milwaukee. March Osthoff. the salesman who cut his throat wi'ii a died early today. Ho is wife and one daughter. by a COMMISSION CALLS j RAILROADS TO BOOK i By Ihe t'nlted Press Assot Washington. D. C. March order to every railroad corporation and private car concern in the United to submit before April 29 all Inform-alion to the proposed Investi- gation was issued by the interstate commerce commission today. The the commission have been charged with -constant failure to furnish prompt supplies of suitable cars. To INVENTOR OF Illinois se li.U inquired b'-ir iii natc white slave probe into low wages' and in uiih vice. Hy the I'niteu I'n-ss Associations. New York. X. March ng his rule of silence. Dr. K. K. today issued a public statement urging tuberculosis suffer- ers in all parts of the country to stay where they arc till government tests have been as it is impos- sible to give treatment in New York hospitals. Tho scenes In tronl of the hospi- tals visited by the tuberculosis spec- ialists today were affecting. Women bearing ragged children stood In the rain waiting Dr. l-'rledniann's arrival. .As. the genuan doctor's auto drove up the doctor's progress wag liallcd by a lableau never equalled in modern times. Women fell on their knees holding up for inspection their plague strick- en little out s. with tears streaming from his Dr. Frledmann forced his way through the throng explaining as best lie could in German that he vyas ivow'erlcss to help them but ur- ging them lo have patience and he would help them all as soon as he could. Prepare Bacilli. D. March skilled bacteriologists of the public hcallh service today began experi- ments with the Krlcdmann ami tit bcrculosis serum. They were preparing billions of tho bacilli from the culture. Inoculation of Uncle Sam's sunad of monkeys with the- culture to test Its efficacy has not yet begun. Hundreds Beg For Cure. New Yolk. March hundred women and children hemmed In the automobile of Dr. Krledrlch K. mann. begging him to treat them for tuberculosis. The crowd surrounded the German physician ouislde ihe bos pltnl for deformities and Joint din and a of police reserves had to be called to make a path for him lo Ihe hospital door. Physicians from all parts of the United States gathered at Mount Slnsl hospital to w-alch Doctor Krledmann administer his but were re- fused admission. The only other medical men at Ihe clinic were three representatives of the at whose request other physicians were excluded assassin of King George otj was In business In la. for several and left there to j return to his naiive country six monihs ago. according to C. II. Chicago correspondent for a Greek new'spaper. ran a coffee said Damascus today. was introduced to him by his brother-in-law who owns a billiard hall. He foiled in business because his countrymen did not his Schinas was an Anarchist. Salonika. March Schinas. the assassin of King is still hold In close confinement. At various periods he was forced to undergo an but without eliciting any facts to show that other persons Implicated In ihe crime. Schinas U not a but ap- parently is weak-minded. He lived by begging and three weeks ago came to Salonika by way of Athens. Inierrogaled as lo why he ted the Schinas had to die as I from and therefore wished to redeem my He appears to have led a wretched subsisting almost on milk. His family has long ceased1 to acknowledge him. He has abroad much of tho lime. Former University Instructor. Schinas for n time was on In tho medical department of the Uni- versity of Athens. He refuses to give any explanation for the crime beyond the fact that two years ago he for assistance at the palace and was driven av.ay by an ald-de-cajnp. The premeditation of the regicide appears to be established by .tho fact' FIVE ASPHYXIATED ohce Break Into Flat to Find Entire Family in Cas Plate Hose. Ilv the I'nlu-d Chicago. 111. March 20- Police broke into a flat hero loday and dis an eii'ire fannlj dead of as- xiation The dead arc Cngli-hrechl Cornelin- Amelia. ICnguald. lacob. and Jennie 1'J. A break ho--e attai lied to a gas ii- 1.nc hen caused the Ira- King Constantine. that Schinas lurked in hiding. Ha rushed out when his royal xlctlm was only six feet from his hiding place- and fired point blank Into Ihe back of the king. Lieutenant Colonel Francoudis. the king's who was walking beside his royal immediately drew his revolver. Schinas turned and tired al the aid but Ihe shot went wild. Two Cretan military policemen who were acting as an e.xcort to Ihe dashed Scblnas and pinioned bis arms before he could tire again. CAPTAIN C. B. HART MAKES LAST PORT SENATE PASSES SUFFRAGE BILL lly I'niii-il I'M Sturgeon Captain Clifford I he oldest of the died early today W.s.. March II. Hart. 71. one of a lakes fo.lowing en attack of heart failure Wednesday. The de- ccaM'd was senior member of the Mart Sleamboat company ho boats Thistle vnd Sailor Hoy. in rubber plate in ih gedy. DESPAIR OF LIFE OF EX-GOVERNOR BLACK Hy I'nltcd Troy. N. Y. March Following a turn for the worse last phy gave up hope of saving the of K S. former governor of New York. Hi.s death was expect cd at any hour. REV. C. S. LESTER DIES ON SHIPBOARD Hy the I'nltrd Prfs Associations. WIs. March tel egrant recehcd here today told of the death on ship board of Charles S. of Kaston. .Md.. for more than n score of years pastor of St. Paul's Kplscopal church here. itcv. who at one time one of ihe ritost prominent churchmen in the w-as reluming frcm ihe can- al rone whither he had gone for his hcallh. Wisconsin Senate Passes Bill Provid. ing for Referendum on Equal Suffrage In 191-1. fni'vil A'- '.I Madison. March lly a vole of 17 to I-'i Wisconsin stato senale pnsscil the bill provid- Inir for referendum in 19H on Iho bill giving cQiial suffrage lo women. The measure now goes to the as- sembly for concurrence. CHICAGO EDITOR SUFFERS STROKE Chicago. March Herman II. Kohlsaat. publisher of the Chica- go Intcr-Occan. suffered a stroke of apoplexy m New York on Satiird-ty evening hecatne known to- ihe fli-tt reports wero in a serious condition. day. While thut he was advices are that his stroke was a slight and lint he Is recovcr-   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication