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Elkhorn Western Star: Friday, August 3, 1849 - Page 1

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   Western Star, The (Newspaper) - August 3, 1849, Elkhorn, Wisconsin                               C. W 8. W. SPAPARD hil C. MM! I. VAIf.lt, i-'I..'., 4. vitl lx AMI M B. Ml.'t t E K. OF -1: VOL. 4. It AJVCIS A. UTTER Devoted to Political Discussion, General Intelligence, and Miscellaneous Reading. EKHORN, WALWORTH CO. Wis, A TGUST 3, NO. 7. 1049 i.t. it.-i j.. 1-l'J i.t PUBLISH Kit M S 10 N H S K I .f r so_ i l A T I'! PII w v v i i I t S iMwmv .U. C. i. II Mi NCI "I It IT It 1V" M III. 17' ItllshclM r. 1 v. I .'i I I Ull ft f AfvC. iff HC1.6C, r- n tl. 5V...... I i ,i It, tt IS. TrnnU t fr i H ft', I', s I. 1 ill .1 I M ..1 from thr 8, Kepoi-.ory nhly [j-livtn, Wn, To 1. P. Wulkcr lor thou coward trait T! A i tlir Jeep stain   n all ill) Kjier.I a ti-H-nv dim lur. j Self CtiUf''iteij fire the jfJiiM; t Unl sloopB low i i udiiilro I lute bate a I '..u. i nun who liy i h.iti- body. -do -tar. From Ihc (Mil-vaukceJ Free Celebration ot the Ordinance of '87. The celebration of tha Anniversary of JefTerHonian Ordinance, at Cleveland, 011 the 13th inatant, was t. great and a glorious gaih- ering of free from most of the Free Stales. We give this weok tile Resolutions adapted by the Convention, and some of the letters of distinguished individuals, who could not be present, to iho committed of invitation, Mctars. Vaughan and Brown. Tho latter of Gamins M. Clay is a noble one, indited by the high nature of the man. Horace Mann, member of Congreis from Massachusetts, at the clcte of a tetter, submitted the following sentiment 7'A< Frtenun of tht United Siaift, whtlhtr at tht A'artH or at tke South. Deeply lamen- ting that tin re not an anti-Satanic pro- viso' to fixtiude tht Devil from the garden of Kdcn, let them rmw be admonished to pass an anti-slavery 'pnviso' to exclude his most loved institution from all the territories of the Union." But the great nit-action of the meeling wan the speech of Jch i Van Bur en, While rea- ding it, our heart beat quicker, and our blood tingled at our'fingeni' ends. It is inilincl throughout with the Ufa and spirit of fn.' edoin. It amply repaid us for all our toils and sacri- fices, to read this testimony from snchn man, to the principles tor which we have battled earnestly ior long weary years. If John wants to (nit his foot, fjr onee, on the soil of n free Jitat and receive such a wel- come men cnly knew liow to give, let him make visit to K Milwau- kee city and cr.urUy, poured out upon the Court House squa1' wouldn't make an audi- ence HufKcii'iit to satisfy UU lunhUUui, we can lake him out uaonjr rurals who till God's soil, and place him in the centre of a prairie, thronged by unshackled humani- ty, and let him i xert his mesmeric power over nun by die ere or square mile. Next week v.-o Mr. Van Burl's speech Old Bastile of the most horrinl of all earth's tyrrannies, may go down. J t lank God that the time has arrived wlu-n its nonnities cnn be no longer covered up in th. dignified and courtly language of poi.ipons tatfimanshiu, nor sanctified by the snivelling of pulpit hypocrisy. In Iho Miitury c Nations the Jastcnme for Slaver to die. The The proposition of the South to hold slaves in larritory now free, by the nid o the Free Peo- ptt. North and is simp! the proposi- ticn of the Pirsile, to call in all tho good peo- ple of his neighborhood in sh: ro in the infa- my and danger uf his crime, w list he appro- priates to himself all tlio profit of Iho enter- prise. Let us on then intl 3 accomplish- ment of our doatiny, undl mayed by tlie dangers and privailons ivhicli 1 eily has made Iho price of tvtry gOi.J. from wounds which tint common h of of Silarery inflicts upon every froa spiri I have been compelled to dictate tfin letter .o an Amanu- ensis. I have the lumor to be. Your obediflii' servant, C. M. CLAY. Tho Committee y Ihat thin terri- then hold by Ihe tins original, and af irtned the future policy of the Am riean People; and that the influence of Government shi-uld he kctpt, actively and lerjietuiilly, on the sido of opinions which deserve, and will, I doubt int, at no distant d ly, meet with the heartfelt uf th'i masses of the pe.iplo of sectii'ii of our widely extended eonfed- Niiiferely sucrcis in your pat- iotic eilbrls, I urn, geiillcmen, very resjteet- nlly, your ubcdioi t servant, MAHTIM 1C, IftlO. received your offieial li'Ucr, n behalf of the Freemen of the Reserve, in- viting rnc tn unite them, at Cleveland in eelcbratinef the am iversary of the passajro of Iho Ordinance of 1787, on tho 13th of July mxl. I concur entirely in opinion as to the wisdom of that gnat measure, and f nm (rlad that it lias secured to the States, on which It operates, an exemption from the. evils of Sla- very. Uut the event of iho passafjo of the Ordinance has never, within my knowledge, ticcn celebrated in any one of the sixty-one years which has Intervened. It ia pro- Fnsed fur Hie first ;ime lo commemorate t is impossible to disguise the conviction, that tliis purpose originates out of the ques- tion, now unfortunately sgitalinor ihe whole l.'ninn, of the introduction of Slavery into New Mexico and California. Whilst no one can be mom oppos 'd than I am to ihe exten- sion of Slavery into those new t'rrilories, ei- thet by the authority of Congress, or by in- dividual eniorprizc, I thould be to do an) tjiinjr. to increase Ihe prevailing ment. I Impo th; t the question will hn perfect order, and tho fars rest sn irr.'.cofully f -i i i- I upon ihrir r-histic sprin.ra thit it ia cmJy bv i the exc'u.n i anj District of Cdliimhla, aid y-six entirely overturned that ciiy. popiilatien should report and cru> bed many of us inhabitants beneath jig hoivinjtm; not rnly Watiia evil of their seld >m [iro'nt la] hut eti account of re- and uarttriilacly Thomas Jefli r on, who first dratted the to foiever p ohibtt '.he in- troduction of slavery int I lis I rritory. Resolved, That we hcliivo, vilh the fath- ers of the Republic, that huiiin i slavery is a political evil; that the gen- eral eovcrlmflht should relieve Self from all j tKn excite- met. in s of and candor, and finally in a tnaanef to add tlrength and sta- bility, instead of t. ringing any danger, to the existence of our Union. In all our differed ees of opinion, should never cease to re rotmber tint we tiie fellow of one common and glorious country, nor tu ejer- ctso mutual And friendly forbmninea. But, gcetlemen. waving all other consider- Indispensable cngiige.nenU will pre- vent my attendance on the occasion, which yon hire done me honor to invite With I am, Yoor liitnd and ob't satrant, H. nr.d otii; ot tin; f.istuiit in ide her trip fniin (o crl.af, beneath their walls. in 71 Hours! Iff..is !s nut last j the B.imn p.'ir.ts may be in half fie hy tiUinfr passafio on the Mayflower which run in connection with tup 11 ia a irprfjinir t.j haw tlir the hu- man m.in' 'Mil lo l.iuisd of wiiere <-h.  fear, from t .e present na- lioiial adminietr.uion. Resolved, That to tl .3 great inter- est and to ensure, in ot'icr res pets, a sound admihistrition of public aflfdiri it is indis- pensable that thenv should ho; nhfbn of all those who love llmlr countty n 'ire lhan mere party, upon iho great sriitci.) e of Human ItigW, pwrnulgated in tbo of J n- depenilencc, and set fvrlli in the Inaugural Address of itfl author. Resolved, That in the spirit the compact solemnly established by the Ordinance of 17S7, between tlie original -atas and the people of the N'cnh'.ves'.ern Te ritory, we re- cognize the duty of Congres to resist the toleration of slavn id tho admis- sion of slave and to su for no change in tha eomplMioa of tha Unit d States Sen- ate except ID feror of Freedom and no addi- tion to lha slave representation in the House of fteprescnlativea, whatever iy b_e thepre- teit of the Congressional comf -orniao, stipu- lation or precedent. Resolved, That the "xiston e of human slavery at the scat of Cavernn ent, is a foal stain upon the escutcheon of ur Repobltc and no efforts ehoultS be sparci to elect Sen- and HeprescntatiT.ia to Jongwss who will Tota unnesitatingly for t o aBolilion ol slivery and the trade in he District 61 Columbia, or for tha removal if oi to a place COIMOC uted to Free Soil. Resolved, That the Free Do: locracy, in iU efforts to rcstora ordinal policy of the on the c slarorj, aidy Mrrjjng gut trie deraoer tia io their vft we of its unnatural alliaaee with' th n, and was at home at 8 iiViueh Tuns Iny, of or volcanic ashes, they re- hours, wi'.h two lost at tariito very spot, rebuild thfcir fdllenhous- limt! 31J innrs. Tho Mayflower; ei< anti the new vubanie soil, which made 070 iniles in a little over l.'i hours, near-j jrl [jmo r jjjays lliuif by an abundant liar- y to the (if our Slortli Uivor uist Of joats. (if our Slortli Uivor [Albany Kvc, Jouf. Amsterdam. Ho in Lima, earthquakes ire of such fro Init the ordinaiy ex- cite alar, n but fir the moiuentamong the inhab- __ itants.; rhBrehad been, howoven coin mo' Like ti toad this city sits stlml Upon the' "r vjolenco as to overturn extensive dts- nnrsliHs; and hoi people push out tho water, who.e burying indpilpup the earth againgt them and sill inl.-.ibil.iiiUin their rums. In thecoursa juleUy down to s-noke. Ships come home! of one hundred and daya; tho city of India anchoring before their doors, com- ing in from the throagil tha they have opened in the sand and unlading (roods on quays that quiver on the bogs. Amsterdam is not the most [iloasnnt place in ;iie world when a Junn sun shining hot up- on thfi dead water'of its canals, and thoir rreen surface is only disturbed by the slug- rtsh barges, or slops of the tidy housemaids, l went through thi streets of the uxerch.int princes of Amsterdam. A broad canal sweeps ihrough the center, fall of every kind of ejift and the dairy womMt land their milk from llieir birges on tho qtiay in front of the very doora. The ho'iacsand half the iials aro ShaJod with deep leaved lindens, and ihc carriages rattle under tha tall innaes on side and the art o'.her. No whrare are tlio girls' prettier than in Holland; complexions -ptifdy white; with just enough of red to gfivs a healihter bloom, and their hands are al fair, soft and tapering, as their eyesare full of mirth, witch- ery and firo. oiperiitncat: contributed gr  ai par berwfter. a silrer rotee, Liiu.i no less lhan four hundrad and thir y rianhquakua. Tlio history oi that nvent, and ihe sitffurtnjfs of llie pi ople, aru ruconieJ by Father K.isebio, who wa i not only an eye-witness of ths ncend, but a euTeritr In thn catastroplie. We may mdily e ;cnse Eusebio giving free vent to his feelings, in describing such a mournful spectteli, as the horror of tho tragedy most have un itted him for critical observations on the nalm-al phenomiiia of such anevaqt, and fixed hi? nttenti n to huid.m Not- withttm-dini; thn of almoit a the acoojnt of Ensdbio eontaius a t'rethnsss and interest which we de- not remember ever to have t een given in any account ot trtilt won- derful e-.-ent and tnch uortions as our hmlta will per nit, cannot fail of being highly inte- resting 10 our readers. It ws.i the niijht of the Octu. bcr, in year seventeen hundred forty- six, wh !e in lAmi wewi- tin.', with great poiap and holy leal, tivfty ol ihose twoapiMftiliesatnU.bi Judas lot seemed blending only linwa ii tha brightneaaof her beama--it.vru on such a niaht. and on an tho drea tful tragedy occurred al uded to that beauty and brlghtnoii waa dim- ceated ilecepiion awd rain! -the Tea- en, eartli bat U was awful It "wi s at half paat ten at nitrrt, mintiM befow wheo a judden wid qoweuatton of earth took plaee.iialf Ae aubtetjarteairf etna 
                            

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