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Centralia Enterprise and Tribune: Saturday, November 9, 1895 - Page 1

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   Centralia Enterprise And Tribune, The (Newspaper) - November 9, 1895, Centralia, Wisconsin                               THE CENTRALJA ENTERPRISE Enterprise, Yol; XVII, No. I Tribune, Tol. XXIII, No. LUEHB BliUNDAGE, Editors and Publishers. CENTRALIA, WIS., SATURDAY, NOV. 9, 1895. Still They Come! Another large line of CLOTH CLOAKS ......and...... FUR CAPES Have just been jinpacked. We are now showing without doubt the largest and most complete line of Fur Capes ever shown here. Capes right in stock from the cheapest to fifty dollars each. _Many new things in Cloth Cloaks. ___ A large line of Children's Cloaks and and Jackets. Many new things for 'THE BABY An immense stock of Ladies' wool Sim Waists A large line of Men's, Ladies', Misses', and Children's Outing Flannel Night Robes And in fact the largest and most com- plete stock of General Merchandise In-this part of the state. Spafford, Cole Lipke, GENERAL MERCHANTS, GRAND RAPIDS, WIS. ABOUT best of medicines are none too good for sick folks. It's bad enough to be sick without running chances with second grade drugs. That's the reason we buy only the very highest quality of everything. It's a great satisfaction to us to know that every prescription we send out is just as good as good drugs will make it. DALY'S DRUG STOHE. ABOUT E; MUSIC 3 We wil1 publish weekly in this space a list of five rS and new have been carefully selected (by Prof. Brown) and will be sure to please you. Cut this adv. out and paste z3K m scrap book, and you will have a list of popular and attractive compositions. Regular Our _ Price Price Popular as sung in Trilby, 40c lOc Popular the Mexican, 75c lOc Easy Teaching Fairy 40c lOc Instrumental 4) Sth Nocturne, 60c lOc Mandolin and of the 40c lOc IF YOU "SEND AWAY" FOR MUSIC, SEND TO US. OUR CATALOGUES ARE FREE. JOHN E. DALY, Finest Candies, 4Oc. DRUGGIST, Full Line Gunther's Candies. Grand Rapids, Wis. t Best Teeth atid guaran- teed to Fit. Extracting 25 cents. All Fine Dental Work at same very low rates for cash. A. B. CRAWFORD, Grand Rapids. 11 (i i The News Still At It. The Marshfield Arews keeps up a desultory-fire atthf Ejxririt- PKISE. But if its guns are no more dang-erous to those who stand behind them than to those in front, its editor must get a heap of amusement out of the boom! boom! boom! he is making'. Probably that's what he does it for. He wants to amuse himself. The Arews likes to hear itself talk about tax-dodging-. But it doesn't arg-ue. Itjlpesn't know enough about fair and square argument to last it from breakfast till lunch time. When a few weeks ago the ENTERPRISE sta- ted that it would not discuss any fur- ther with the the question of tax-dodging in Wood county, it did so not from any fear that it was treading- on dangerous g-rovyid. It did so mere- ly sense in carrying further a fruitless discussion with an opponent who used the ques- tion of taxation merely as a peg upon which to hang his malicious slurs at the citizens of the twin cities. The ENTERPRISE could see no sense in con- tinuing forever to deny the iterated and reiterated charge of the News that the practice of tax-dodging is worse in these cities than it is at Marshfield. The ENTERPRISE felt, and feels now, that until the News substan- tiates its charge by facts and figures, the ENTERPRISE'S denial is as valid as the News' assertion. That is why the ENTERPRISE declined to continue the discussion, and-the only reason. It is decidedly monotonous to carry on any length of time a debate with a man who mistakes mere gratuitous asser- tions for logic and argument. When the Nezvs gets ready to argue the ques- tion fairly and squarely the ENTER- PRISE is ready to meet it half way. Till then we leave the Nezvs on the ridge-pole of its own conceit to crow over its supposed brilliant victory. (He Howe High Schoo IVIcct In Exciting Cosi- a large number of Enthuat- the firai Game on the Gridiron in the Score, to O in favor of Springborn Sentenced. Theodore Spring-born, whose cap- ture, preliminary examination and in- carceration the ENTERPRISE chronicled in its last issue, decided to plead guiltv to the charges of embezzlement and forgery, and was taken before Judge Webb at Waupaca Thursday to re- ceive sentence. His attorney, F. A. Cady, accompanied him to plead for leniency. But in view of the wide- spread financial havoc he has wrought in the homes of those who can but ill afford the loss, he was given the full penalty of the at hard labor in the slate penitentiary at Waupun for a term of five years. Mr. Springborn was at first overcome when the sentence was pronounced, but he soon became reconciled to his fate. Mrs. Springborn has shown a devotion to her husband that could not fail to awaken sympathy. She has been with him almost constantly ever since his capture, and was also at his side when the court pronounced sentence. Sheriff Lindahl brought the prisoner back to the county seat to allow him to turn over to the proper parties certain papers relating to some real estate matters. Mr. Springborn was taken to Waupun to-day. Robbed Of a nice head of hair just through negligence. When your hair begins to fall out, don't neglect it, but g-et a bottle of Beggs' Hair Renewer which will stop its falling out, and if turn- ;-nS gray, will restore its natural color. For sale by R. C. Worthington. The Only One To Stand the Test. Rev. William Copp, whose father was a physician for over fifty years, in New Jersey, and who himself spent many years preparing for the practice of medicine, but subse- quently entered the ministry of the M. E. Church, writes: "I am glad to testify that I have had analyzed all the sarsaparilla prepara- tions known in the trade, but AVER'S is the only one of them that I could recommend as a blood-puri fier. I have given away hundreds of bottles of it, as I consider it the safest as well as the best to be COPP, Pastor M. E. Church, Jackson, Minn. s THE OKLT WORLD'S TAIR 'Sarsaparilla When in doubt, ask for Ayer's Pllla Saturday was a red letter day for the Howe High School. Early in the forenoon the appearance of the cardi- nal and white upon the streets and the nervous toot of the tin horn showed that the pupils were awaiting anxiously the contest between their eleven heroes and the gritty boys from Tomah. The Tomah High School yell: Hoxie! Moxie! Razzle! Dazzle! Zip! Boom! Bah! Tomah! Toiiiah! Rah! Rah! Rah! announced the arrival of the sturdy little warriors on the morn- ing train and the Grand Rapids! Grand Rapids! Zip! Boom! Bah! Howe Hig-h School! Rah! Rah! Rah! showed that the boys of Grand Rapids were there to receive them. Shortly after dinner the tallyho dec- orated with the Tomah High school colors, yellow and white, passed through Main street on the way to the fair grounds with the Tomah players. About two o'clock the Grand Rapids boys followed in the same style. Both crowds enlivened the streets with their war whoop as they journeyed to the baltle ground. A more beautiful day could not have been asked for, and consequently the ground was crowded with spectators, anxious to see the much-talked-of game of football. It was the first game ever played in the twin cities to say that it met with apprecia- tion and aroused enthusiasm, is put- ting it very mildly. At both teams were on the field passing the ball and "warming up." The Tomah boys looked like giants to the opposing eleven, but in fact averaged three pounds lighter than the Howe High School team. The Grand Rapids bovs all appeared in their new canvas uniforms, with scarlet stockings and vsr-jiite jackets bearing the letters H. H. S. in scarlet. On the whole the teams would havebeen evenly matched hVd it not been for the inexperience of the local club. The game was called at Cap- tains Wells and Podawiltz flipped for goals and kick-off. Tomah winning the flip gave Grand Rapids the ball and chose the west goal. The game started with a kick-off by Grand Rap ids caught by Graham and advanced half way toward the local goal Tomah then went around the Granc Rapids left end for a touch-down Goal was kicked by Captain Wells Tomah 6, Grand Rapids 0. This was all done in less than two minutes after the ball was put in play and while the Grand Rapids boys were wondering what football was. The boys were quick to catch on, however, and from this time on fought every inch oi ground fiercely. Love kicked-off for Grand Rapids. The ball was caught and by good in- terference was advanced 20 yards by Tomah. Tomah then tried the center and for the first time met a great sur- prise. The Grand Rapids line held like a stone wall and after three stub- born attempts Tomah was forced to yield the pig-skin to their adversaries. The "scarlet and white" sent Rablin through Tomah's center for a fine game of ten yards, but in the next play lost the ball on a fumble. Tomah then sent Graham around the end with one of his long gains, which the good interference of Tomah enabled him to constantly make. The center was then tried for short gains, the criss- cross was tried with a fumble, and the ball passed to Grand Rapids on downs. Grand Rapids made a fumble and soon lost on downs. Tomah tried the center again with no effect. After pushing the oval backward and forward on the gridiron for sometime, Tomah sent Bell around the end for their second touch-down. Wells kicked goal. Tomah 12, Grand Rapids 0. Grand Rapids kicked off. Tomah made a splendid gain but lost on downs. Rablin then plowed Tomah's center time after time for good gains. Grand Rapids lost on downs. Tomah made long gains around the end and soon sent Graham over the line for the third touch-down. Wells kicked goal. Tomah 18, Grand Rapids 0. The ball was put in play with a fine kick-off by Love. The ball was car- ried but a short way by Tomah when it was stopped by a splendid tackle by Ford. Time of the first half was called with the ball in the center of field. Schultz was substituted for Graham at the end of the first half. The second half started with a kick- off by Tomah, caught by Briere who advanced it without the aid of inter- ence fifteen yards. The ball soon passed to Tomah on downs. After a good run around the end by Wells the ball passed to Grand Rapids on downs. The Grand Rapids boys broke Tomah's line time after time for long gains. Rablin, Ford and Podawiltz tried the center repeatedly for long gains with great success. Menzel broke away for a fifteen yard gam. Nothing seemed able to stop a score for Grand Rapids. The audience was enthusiastic and the tin horns were deafening-. In the meantime a dispute arose over the possession of the ball and Tomah rested up for a strong de- fence. The ball was now within fif- teen yards of the Tomah goal and their line appeared to be too weak to stop Grand Rapids' hard rushers. But a sudden change took place. The line braced up and Tomah secured the ball on downs. They were not long in rush- ing it back to the Grand-Rapids fifty, yard line and then carried it around the end on a criss-cross fourth touch- down. Wells kicked goal. Score, Tomah 24, Grand Rapids 0. The game ended with the ball in the center of he field in the possession of Tomah. Grand Rapids had failed to score as was expected but they had held Tomah down to four touch-downs, and played them almost even in the second half. The grame was won on fine interfer- ence of the visitors, and the poor de- fence of the home team. Time after time the Tomah boys circled the Grand Rapids end for fifteen to twenty yard gains. The home team were unable to stop these plays until too -late. The Tomah interference could not be bro- ken without hard work. The home line however stood like a stone wall and Tomah made very few gains ex- cept around the ends. The Tomah center on the other hand, proved a rope of sand for the Howe Hig-h school boys and very seldom held against the rush of the backs. Tomah bhowed up fine in team work, but Grand Rapids' considering experience, showed quite as many gxjod individual players. Ford, left half back, played a star game. He was in every play and was seen half the time dangling from the leg-s of the Tomah runner. Love played an enthusiastic and strong- game and was in every push. Rablin backed the center for his share of the gains. Podawiltz played a good game as right half back, and made some fine tackles. Ward and Briere as ends, played an exceptionally good game, after tackling their man behind the line. Bullis played a fine game as center and may be credited with a good deal of the strength of the line. Menzel played a strong game in the line and the only time he had the ball made a long run. Compton broke through the opposing line twice and downed the man with the ball before he could move. Kellogg and Roenius each played a steady and faithful game. The boys lack good team work but have learned a good deal by this game. Graham, Wells, Bell and Sowle of the Tomah team deserve special mention for fine work. The line-up a is follows: TOMAH. (MtANII KAl'IMS. I'ltfM.............Icll (rtiM.nl............Kellojflr. tackle............Mciix.el Utteoli............right tackle..........Compton McPliersoti..........left end...............Ward Sowle..............quarter back............Love Graham...........left half back............Ford Wells right half back (capt.) back............Rablin Umpire, Naylor; Krferee, Ford; Linesmen Williams, McCaul. The Tomah boys deserve the credit of playing a clean, gentlemanly game, and even in the heat of the contest were considerate and fair. The boys departed on the evening train leaving a good record on football and conduct. i.swith especial-pride and-pleas- ure that the ENTERPRISE chronicles this week the happy union of two the twin cities' most worthy and esteemed young- people. Tuesday evening, November Sth, at six o'clock, Rev. Kilburne pronounced the beauti- ful ceremony which bound in holy wedlock Mr. John Newton Brundage and Miss Minnie Maude Thompson. The nuptials took place at the home of the bride's mother on Hig-h street, Grand Rapids, in the presence of relatives and a few intimate friends. Miss Mary Edwards acted as brides- maid and Mr. W. A. Brazeau stood up with the groom. After the ceremony the hearty congratulations and best wishes of those present were extended the ho-uuv couple, "after" which a sumptuous wedding supper v? as served Mr. and Mrs. Brundag-e were the recip- ients of a large number of beautiful and valuable of es- teem from their friends. The groom is a young- printer of sig- nal ability. He comes from a family of newspaper men, and he took to of- fice work as naturally as a duck does to water. With his older brother he worked on the ENTERPRISE while at- tending school and he mastered all the ins and outs of the work in a thorough manner. After graduation from the Howe High School in 1891, he went to Bismarck, N. D., where he held for a couple of years a position in the job department of the Daily Tribune, returning- about two years ago, since when he has been foreman of the ENTERPRISE office. He is a job printer of experience a'nd skill, and, moreover, is endowed with artistic taste, qualities which give him few superiors in his chosen vocation. The bride is one of the twin, cities' most charming young- ladies who pos- sesses in full and rounded measure those qualities of heart and 'mind which will make her a loving- help- mate to the husband of her choice and a charming mistress of the home over which she comes to preside. Mr. and Mrs. Brundage will room and board with Mrs. Balderston for the winter, when they will begin housekeeping for themselves. They will be at home to their friends after December lift; A host of friends wish them happi- -n-ess unbroken hi their new life, a wish in which the ENTERPRISE heart- ily joins. Dogs' Sad Havoc. Farmers' Institute. The appointment for farmers' insti- tutes has been made for the coming winter. One hundred and one insti- tutes will be held and all will be con- ducted by practical and experienced Farmers. Low prices for all kinds of farm produce compel farmers to pay attention to the most scientific and economical processes of production and these will be discussed at the various institutes. Wood county has secured only one institute, to be held at Milla- dore December Sth and 6th. The insti- tute held there last winter was a splen- did success, and the ENTERPRISE hopes that the coming gathering may be fully as well attended and as success- ful. M. Church. Rev. J. R. Reynolds, pastor. Services for Sunday, Nov. 10, 1895. a. m., preaching by the pastor. Theme, "Soul Sunday School, 12 m. Junior League, 3 p. m, Epworth League, p. m. Evening service Lecture on "John Weslev." Of what use under the sun is, the av- erage dog, anyway? This question will be hard to answer satisfactorily for nine-tenths of the miserable curs that now bay aimlessly at the moon and make night hideous by their un- called-for yowl. From the pampered poodle petted in the lap of indolent wealth down to the cur that follows the farmer's wagon info town, there is but scant excuse for their be- ing. But when to his general useless- ness he adds sundry natural and ac- quired vicious habits, there is abso- lutely no excuse whatever for hit, liv- ing. Among other vicious habits is that of midnight depredations upon a farmer's sheep. Dogs have proven themselves a serious enemy to the sheep-husbandry. Hardly a farmer who has raised sheep any number of years, but what has at some time or another been a loser from the havoc wrought among his flock by some mis- erable curs. The ENTERPRISE was in- formed this week that a number of farmers in the town of Rudolph have within the past two weeks lost over a hundred sheep through somebody's vicious cur or curs. Mr. Frank Sharkey lost four nice sheep, the Rezins lost a number, and others in that neighborhood were more or less heavy losers. It is to hoped that the owner of the miserable, good-for noth- ing cur may be found and he be made to foot the damages wrought. It strikes the ENTERPRISE that when a man thinks enough of a dog- to al- low him about his person or premises, he ought to think enough of him to keep him at home night times so that he won't break into his neighbors' sheep folds. About the only g-ood dog there is, anyhow, is a dead dog-, and the more there is of them the better the world would be off. Found. l.ast. A sure cure for Diarrhoea and Sum- mer Complaint. It is Eeg-gs'Diarrhoea Balsam. Druggists do not KEEP it. They SELL it. For sale by R. C. Worthington, the popular druggist. Acts at once, never fails. One Min- ute Cough Cure. A remedy for asthma, and that feverish condition which accompanies a severe cold. The pnly harmless remedv that produces in-mediate Johnson, Hill 'Co. NEWSPAPER!   

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