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Appleton Post Crescent: Tuesday, October 30, 1973 - Page 1

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   Appleton Post-Crescent (Newspaper) - October 30, 1973, Appleton, Wisconsin                                Welfare rolls take rare dip What a way to go A vertical evacuation tube is demonstrated in Paris. Designers say that more than persons could be evacuated from buildings within an hour by going inside the tube, which is synthetic textile that stretches horizontally. (AP Wirephoto) Dafa on Ford fo be confidential BY LAWRENCE L. KNUTSON Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) -The Senate Rules Committee has agreed to a Justice Department request that it strictly limit access to pages of "raw" FBI in- vestigative reports on the fitness of to be vice president. Declaring they have no intention of stalling or delaying consideration of the nomination, committee members voted unanimously Monday to call Ford as the first witness at confirmation hearings beginning Thursday morning. The Senate Democratic leadership, meanwhile, advocated "all due deliberateness" on the nomination. Rules Committee Chairman Howard W. Cannon, D-Nev., said that Acting Arty. Gen. Robert H. Bork last Wed- nesday withdrew by letter a previous Justice Department promise to provide nine committee members with sum- maries of the FBI's investigation into Ford's background. With Cannon abstaining, the commit- tee voted unanimously Monday to accept Bork's new offer to provide only the meaning unevaluated, inves- tigative file. Access to that file is limited to Cannon and to the committee's ranking Republican, Sen. Marlow W. Cook, R- Ky. They have been examining the file since Wednesday and are to prepare their own summary for committee members. Cannon said an FBI man is in the room with him at all times when he is ins- pecting the reports. He said the agent is thoroughly familiar with the raw data and can answer questions on it. All of the material is returned to the Justice Department each day when he and Cook have completed their examination of it, Cannon said. Cannon said the original promise to provide summaries to all members came from an assistant attorney general whose name he said he could not recall. The chairman said he preferred the earlier arrangement. "I don't relish myself being put in the position of WASHINGTON (AP) nation's welfare rolls edged downward in fiscal 1973 for the first time in seven years, while the rise in expenditures slowed markedly, according to a new govern- ment report released today. Department of Health, Education and Welfare figures show that 14.8 million persons were receiving public assis- tance at the end of last June, a decrease of or 1.7 per cent fewer than a year ago. Costs for federal-state welfare programs totaled S19.4 billion for the 12-month period, an increase of Sl.l billion or 6 per cent over fiscal 1972 when spending shot up 17.4 per cent and the number of recipients topped the 15- m ill ion mark. The last time the nation's welfare caseload decreased was in 1967, when a net loss of about recipients dropped the total 1.2 per cent to 7.7 million persons. Then the rolls began spiralmg upward each year, to 9.1 million, 10.2 million, 12.2 million, 14.3 million and 15.1 million. The bulk of the fiscal 1973 reduction occurred among the elderly, who were shifted off welfare when they began receiving higher Social Security benefits, and those persons on general assistance which involves no federal funds. The Old Age Assistance caseload dropped or 8.9 per cent, to 1.8 million persons, and general assistance fell or 15.3 per cent, to persons. The 10.9 million recipients of Aid to Families with Dependent Children represented a statistically insignificant decrease of persons but a marked improvement over the previous year when the AFDC caseload mushroomed 6.8 per cent or nearly 700.000. In other categories, the Aid to the Blind caseload decreased 4 1 per cent to recipients and Aid to the Per- manently and Totally Disabled rose 6 6 per cent to 1.2 million. Aged, blind and disabled welfare cases will be shifted to the new Supplemental Security Income program beginning Jan. 1. Cash payments to federal welfare recipients totaled 5 billion last fiscal year, an increase of 2-3 per cent, and Medicaid spending topped SS billion, a 14.2 per cent hike. msiDE It was a spooky weekend. A-12 State urged fo inspect Riverview. 8-1 and more... Comics....................B- 4 Editorials..................A- 4 Obituaries.................B-12 Sports.....................B- 8 TV log.....................B- 7 Theaters..................B- 6 Vital statistics.............A-15 Women's news.............A-12 Fox Cities .................B-1 Chilly Fair and cooler tonight, low in the mid 30s. Partly sunny, high in the low 50s Wednesday. Weather map on page B-12 j Post-Crescent 32 Pages Appleton-Neenah-Menasha, Wis., Tuesday, October 30, 1973 15 cents Top level talks set on Mideast making the decision of what is and what is not he said. Cannon said he already has gone through about 900 pages of the material and has requested additional informat- ion from the FBI. Raw FBI reports often include rjjnpjrgyed, and unsubstantiated allegat- ions and innuendo. In his letter to Cannc- three after he replaced the resigned Elliot L. Richardson, Bork cited reasons of con- fidentiality of the files and the need to protect the innocent in withdrawing the summary offer. A statement issued Monday by Senate Democratic leader Mike Mansfield, said consideration of the Ford nomination should take place with "all due deliberatness." House Speaker Carl Albert, D-Okla., said he was confident that work on the nomination will be completed this year. Cannon predicted a resolution will be reached by Thanksgiving. Tne Ford nomination also must be considered by the House Judiciary Committee, which has not announced when its hearings wiil begin. Cannon said the Rules Committee was not relying entirely on the FBI reports in its examiation of Ford's background. He said the committee also expects reports from the General Accounting office and from its own investigative staff. Cannon acknowledged he has received an affidavit from former Washington lobbyist Robert Winter-Berger and is reading Winter-Berger's book, Washington which makes allegations concerning Ford and other government leaders. The contents of the affidavit were published Sunday by columnist Jack Anderson. Cannon would not say whether the Rules Committee was considering calling Winter-Berger as a witness. Naked pumpkin seed named for Lady Godiva WASHINGTON (AP) The Agricul- ture Department has unveiled a naked pumpkin seed called Lady Godiva which officials say is great for toasting as snack food. "Toasted pumpkin seeds have become an increasingly popular food, but it takes a real aficionado to shuck the hard the department says, "the hull-less seeds of Lady Godiva pumpkins solve this problem because they no coats." The new Lady Godiva pumpkins, grown mostly in California on a limited basis for the first time this year, have one flaw: The flesh is too coarse for pies. But it makes fine livestock feed. WASHINGTON Prime Minister Golda Meir is coming to the United States to confer with President Nixon on Thursday about the Middle East crisis, the White House announced today. Deputy Press Secretary Gerald L. Warren also said Nixon would meet on Wednesday with Egypt's acting Foreign Minister Ismail Fahmy, who began exploratory talks with Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger on Monday on ways to settle the Middle East-conflict. As part of what he called Nixon's "efforts to faring lasting peace to the Middle Warren said the President also would meet at 6 p.m. today at his Camp David, Md., retreat with Soviet Ambassador Anatoly F. Dobrynin, who has been a go-between in the U.S.-Soviet diplomatic moves Studded fire use begins Nov. 1 5 MADISON Studded tires may be legally used in Wisconsin starting Nov. 15 but motorists have been urged to delay using them until absolutely necessary. Studded tires on dry pavement cost taxpayers unnecessary expense, ac- cording to the state Division of Motor Vehicles. In addition to wearing ruts in the pavement surface that can create dangerous conditions, studded tires can actually be a safety hazard when used on dry or wet pavements instead of on the primarily glare ice for which they are intended, the division said. In addition, use of studded tires on dry pavement causes prematurely ex- cessive wear to the tire itself. Studded tires are legal for use in the state from Nov. 15, 1973 through April 1, 1974. spawned by the latest outbreak of fighting in the troubled region- Warren said Mrs. Meir's hastily arranged visit was by "mutual agreement." He said the precise time for the session, which presumably will be held at the White House, had not been set, but was expected to take place at about noon on Thursday. The White House made it's an- nouncement as Kissinger entered a second meeting with Fahmy, the special Egyptian envoy who arrived in Washington Monday evening to discuss cementing the Middle East cease-fire and the opening of Arab-Israeli talks. Warren said Kissinger will join the 3 p.m. Wednesday meeting between Nixon and Fahmy. The Secretary of State also will participate in Nixon's Camp David meeting this evening with Dobrynin. In his brief announcement. Warren said: "The Prime Minister of Israel, Mrs. Golda Meir. will be coming to Washington for a working visit. Mrs. Meir will meet with the President on Thursday, Nov. 1. The Prime Minister will also confer with the Secretary of State, Dr. Henry A. Kissinger." Warren then announced the separate meetings with the Egyptian and Soviet emissaries and said "these meetings are all part of the President's efforts to bring lasting peace to the Middle East." The sessions, Warren added, are a continuation of the diplomatic contacts intended to build a framework for the establishment of a durable Middle East settlement. With the announcements, it became increasingly clear that the United States is serving as a middleman between Israel and the Arab nations in an effort to narrow the negotiating gap. The United States is in especially close contact with Israel, as illustrated by announcement of Mrs. Meir's visit, and the Soviet Union presumably is in equally close touch with the Arab states. Carrier in Indian Ocean WASHINGTON (AP) Pentagon says a six-ship U.S. Navy carrier force is on its way to the Indian Ocean but that the movement is unrelated to the build- up of Soviet naval forces in the Medit- erranean. Pentagon spokesman Jerry W Friedheim issued the denial Monday, several hours after he had volunteered news of the U.S. naval move and told reporters the United States as "watching with interest the increasing size of the Soviet fleet" in the Medi- terranean. Friedheim later emphasized there was "no relation'' between the move of the U.S. carrier Hancock, accompanied by four destroyers and refueling oii tanker, into the Indian Ocena and Soviet naval operations in the Mediterranean. The Suez Canal, closed since the 1967 Arab-Israeli war. is the only direct sea route between the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean. The Soviet Mediterranean force has been increasing steadily throughout the recent Middle East hostilities. Friedheim said the fleet went from 85 vessels to about 90 Monday. But in his later statement he stressed, "Defense Secretary James R. Schlesinger said Friday we were a long way from a confrontation with the Soviets then, and we are even further from any such confrontations today." Hang in there! "Hot Chestnut' screaks Jc the finish hne ahead of despite jockey Ray Selkrig, who hargs tightly to the reins, but from the wrong side of the horse. "Chestnut was declared winner of the Flymg Welter Handicap at Kembia Grange, near Sydney, Australia. (AP Wirephoto) Wage-price control still needed, Grayson says By BILL NEIKIRK WASHINGTON (AP) -Wage-price controls should be dropped, but not until the economy slows down a little and food prices stabilize, says the former head of the defunct Price Commission. C. Jackson Grayson Jr.. who headed the commission during its 14-month existence until it was disbanded in January, said now is not the time for the Nixon administration to junk controls. "They can't afford to take them off right Grayson said in a telephone interview. "There would be such an explosion in prices that there would be a great demand for more stringent con- trols." He said the public resistance would be so great that Congress might even legislate a price freeze, a policy tool he opposes to deal with the present price surge. Grayson said he saw no chance that controls could be dropped this year but added, "hopefully, early next year, it will be possible. By then, I hope the food-price rises will have abated and the economy will have slowed down to give a little breathing room." A slower economy usually means there is less pressure, for price increases. Grayson, who has returned to his economics post at Southern Methodist University, said he favored allowing the legal authority for wage-price controls to expire next April 30 because retaining it creates a temptation for continuing controls after their usefulness has ex- pired. That legal authority is contained in the Economic Stabilization Act, which ex- pires next April 30. Unless Congress extends the power, wage-price controls will automatically end on that date. Grayson said, however, that there may be a tradeoff with Congress in which wage-price controls are formally aban- doned, but standby authority for them is retained. President Nixon has not announced V whether he will seek an extension of the law, but his economic aides want to scrap wage-price controls as soon as the rate of inflation shows positive signs of cooling. Grayson, who was in charge of Phase 2 of wage-price controls, said that wage-price restraints "can work for a limited period of as they did during Phase 2. But now, he said, with the economy having gone through a boom and heavy demand present for commodities, price controls can do little to restrain inflat- ion. "At the first opportunity, they should remove Grayson said. Archibald Cox News leak admitted by Cox WASHINGTON (AP) -Archibald Cox testified today he may have been the source of a news leak about a telephone call from President Nixon instructing former Any. Gen. Richard G. Klein- dienst not to appea! one phase of the ITT antitrust case. The ousted special Watergate prosecutor said that if he indirectly had been the source of a story about the antitrust case in today's New York Times, he was sorrv and said it was an "error of carelessness." Cox's surprise statement before the Senate Judiciary Committee followed publication in the Times of a store sayi- ng it had learned from an unidentified source that a Nixon cail to Kieindienst had held up a planned Justice Depart- ment appeal of an adverse court decision in the antitrust case. The White House called the Times' story "distorted and unfair" and ac- cused Cox's former staff of "an inex- cusable breach of confidence" :n the matter. Cox said that he was greatly upset by the leak and, after racking his recalled that on one occasion it was possible he had mentioned the subject to others outside his prosecutor's office. He went on to say tha: he had disclosed Nixon's reported all to to Sens. Philip A. Hart. and Ed- ward M. Kennedy. D-N'ass.. ar.c two members of their staffs. He told the committee that of these four had assured :'-.a: thev had not given the information to the 7irr.es. In Han's case, he added, this assurance was received indirectly the senator is sick- He added he hoped the committee members would be "charitaD'.e e-.' Jgh" to believe that he had not intended ;ha: the information would be leaked to tr.e press. In explaining how he happened disclose the informatior.. Cox said :ha: during the stress and strain of the las: two weeks. "1 spoke more freeiv thar. intended with a few friends He acknowledged that he had broker. a confidence with wh' deputy attorney genera; at the y.rre of the out-of-court settlement of the ar.r.t- rust cases against Ir.terr.atior.ai Telephone Telegraph Corp. "It was inexcusable." Cox said fee: very badly this morning He however, that it mace better to acknowledge "my error The Times story. quor.-.H said Kieindienst had to'd ".Vatergate prosecutors that caned him. about the antitrust case after turned down a request Jor.r D Ehriichman. then a hite House ad- viser, to drop appea! of adverse court decision. The appea] was held up and the government agreed to an out-of-cour: settlement that allowed ITT to keep the Hartford Insurance Co. while giving up other holdings, including Canteen Corp. The White House said of the story, "this information comes from a highly confidential conversation between Cox and Kieindienst and from documents furnished voluntarily and also furnished in absolute confidence- by the White House to Mr. Cox." "The information furnished by the White House and Mr. Kieindienst put the matter into fair and accurate perspec- the White House added. Judiciary Chairman James 0. Eastland, D-Miss., asked Cox what his opinion was of the settlement reached by Continued on page 2 .'SPAPERf   

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