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Appleton Post Crescent: Wednesday, October 24, 1973 - Page 1

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   Appleton Post-Crescent (Newspaper) - October 24, 1973, Appleton, Wisconsin                                limberly police vow to carry out resignation threat JERLY Angered over a one- elay of their public hearing, five policemen will notify the Police re Commission tonight that they in to carry- out their planned Oct. mations. men George Van Cuick, s Oatman, James Stefanic, dl Knutson and Gerald Thomack notified the commission two ago that they intended to resign but then they agreed to see what ed at a public hearing the com- i set for that date, tearing on the men's complaints ing Police Chief Donald Schmeck jartment working conditions was I to Nov. 6 by commissioners ley met Tuesday night in special Village Atty. Roger Clark said the change was needed because it was dis- covered that state statutes dictate Schmeck must receive the written charges no fewer than 10 days prior to the hearing. Commissioners did not make a final review of the men's charges until Tuesday night, Clark said. He said he had erroneously advised commissioners earlier that the charges had to be given to Schmeck only five days before the hearing. He said he was acting on out- dated provisions in commission regula- tions. Schmeck, through his attorney, refused to waive the 10-day notice, making it impossible to have the hear- ing Oct. 30, Clark said. The written charges will be served on Schmeck today, according to Clark. An attorney for the five policemen (Schmeck is the only other village policeman) filed a lettei with commis- sioners seeking Schmeck's suspension pending the outcome of the charges. The commission did not ask for the suspension. The policemen, who have said that either Schmeck goes or they will quit, see the commission's action Tuesday as a stalling tactic. The policemen contend that they have gone along with the commission "in good faith." Patrolman James Stefanic, a spokes- man for the five men, said the charges will not be withdrawn, despite the resignations- The policemen still want the public hearing, he explained. Copies of support petitions will be filed with the letters cf intent today. Stefanic said. The petitions contain signatures of some 200 Kimberly voters, he explained, including a number of business and professional people. The policemen have met once in closed session with commissioners. After unsuccessful efforts to resolve the problems, the commission set the for- mal, public hearing. In general, the policemen contend that Schmeck is sncornpeten: to be chief, a job he has held for six years He has been a village policeman IS years. Their specific complaints and grievances will be made public after they are filed wuh Schmeck The men have complained that SchmecK nas created "intolerable working conditions" in the department. They have charged that he has been responsible for a breakdown in cooperation with other police agencies and has created dissension among his own men. Knutson and Thomack have been with the department less than a year. Schmeck said last week he had no intention of quitting and if he is fired, he would go to court. He saw the men's resignation plans as an attempt to in- timidate him. He has admitted there are problems in his department, but he has not de- tailed them publicly. Outagamie County Sheriff Calvin L Spice has said that if the men quit he probably would have to provide police protection for the village. Past-Crescent 68 Pages Appleton-Neenah-Menasha, Wis., Wednesday, October 24, 1973 15 cents killed fog on rnpike IY, N.J. (AP) least 11 fere killed and more than 40 )day in three major pile-ups ;s of minor accidents on the led New Jersev Turnpike, 1. 5 expressed fear the death toll higher as more bodies were from the twisted wreckages of d cars. "We really can't say f are dead at this said Sgt. Joseph Kobus. :k driver, who became coated sphalt from another truck, ran ps alongside the highway and ted missing. ng to state police, at least >ons died in the largest crash, olved some 22 vehicles just the Kearny Interchange in i, where the roadway passes fewark and New York, ler persons were killed in two ccidents in the Secaucus area, miles northeast of here, said the accident near the terchange resulted from low :aused by the fog mixed with m a week-long swamp fire in nsack Meadowlands. He said major accidents also resulted aid the series of pileups con- ie worst traffic mishap in the the turnpike, which opened in Dke and fog also hindered res- tions, police said, oint, the turnpike, the nation's jll road, was closed in both is from Woodbridge to its terminus near the George >n Bridge, a distance of more iles. he southbound lanes of the were reopened from the terminus to Secaucus. Also s the Hudson Bay extension, is to the Holland Tunnel into lid that the second worst crash ce history occurred only last when a bus-car-truck collision lentown killed eight and in- iding highways were snarled e traffic jams as the accidents V'ew York-bound motorists sh hour. The tieups continued norning. Ibridge, some commuters left 1 buses and tried to hitchhike ird home. Some of the drivers in the three major accidents was at fault. Several told of from behind after stopping icy couldn't see. Fleetwood, a truck driver for ;el Casket Co. of Woodland,   swatter in the other. "You should have been here yesterday. It was like the Battle of Britain. We saw seven planes shot down and the sky above was full of the trail marks of dog fights." Today wasn't exactly quiet in the air. Horst Faas, AP's two-time Pulitzer Prize winning photographer, climbed aboard an armored personnel carrier going to join a tank attack on an Egyptian missile site a mile away. A plane came screaming out of the sky to deliver its bomb load in defense of the missile site, then, seeing the lone carrier on the dunes returned for a low strafing run. Flying at less than 40 feet above the desert it stitched the sand with machine gun rounds as the driver wildly to avert the deadly fire and the carrier's gunners opened up with their own machine guns Faas and a TV crew from the Br.t.sh Broadcasting Corp. dived for ins.de the armored ver.icle and emerged in time to see Israeli Phantom jets shoot down the accompanying Egyptian ngr.ter that had been flying cover. ord" of a cease-f'.re haa just come over the radio Mondav evening and the men were jubilant but cautious. "We are civilians; we have to get back to our ;obs or there will be no country to return said Cpi. Danny, who in peacetime works with four other men from the same unit in the communica- tions unit of the post office. One young sergeant, on the day of the independence war in 1948, managed to contact his local hospital and learned that his wife had given birth to their first son on the day he crossed into Egypt. They had months ago decided on the name Oded, if the baby was a boy, but now history dictated the name "Moses." V B-- r and more... Comics Editorials Obituaries Sports TV log Theaters Vital statistics Women's news Fox Cities B-8 A-6 D-9 D-I C-13 C-12 D-9 C-l B-l f Cooler I Variably cloudy tonight, low in upper 50s or low 60s. Variably cloudy Thursday and cooler with a chance of showers. High in the low 60s. Weather map on page D-9 NEWSPAPER!   

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