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   Appleton Post-Crescent (Newspaper) - November 27, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                               APPLETON POST CRESCENT VOL LH No. 32 30 A, B APPLETON-NEENAH-MENASHA, WIS., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS WIRE SERVICE Price Seven Cents Nehru Gets Support in Dispute AP Wlrephoto Mrs. Arthur Flemming Passes a dish of cranberry salad to her secretary of wel- fare husband as they posed Thursday with the table set for their Thanksgiving day dinner. Several weeks ago Flemming in his official capacity announced that some of the cranberry supply has been tainted by a weed killer. Since then, cran- berries on sale have been stamped as government approved; Discuss Bases In Philippines U. S. and Island Military Leaders Reach Agreement Manila U. S. and Philippine military command- ers conferred for two Guevara, will fall even more be- today and reportedly agreedjieader in Fidel Castro's offi-jfore starting to improve in on new joint security meas- Cial family, promised (the start of the Sees No Change in Economic Program Guevara Takes Over as Head Of National Bank in Cuba BY EGBERT BERRELLEZ .guard Cuba's foreign ex- Havana Maj. Ernesto change level, "which presum- ures for American bases here. belt-tightening for Cubans to- The conference was called' day but said there would be by Philippine Defense Sec.! no drastic changes in econom- Alejo Santos in the wake ofjic asr fh.e (presidency of the Cuban Na- an American congressman's Uonal bank In an interview with the semi-official newspaper Revo- lucion, Guevara said his most important task will be to safe- demand that the United States abandon this country as a Pa- cific defense outpost. Rep. Phil Weaver (R-Neb) issued a "statement in Wash- ilngton ..Wednesday charging that a "graft-ridden" Philip- pine government was openly harassing American service- men and that there was "mass looting of American property" here. Weaver's statement drew a storm of protest _in Manila, marked by bitter references to "ugly Americans" and threats to abrogate treaties with the United States. Crimes Increase It also focused attention on a recent rash of crimes in U. S military base areas, par- ticularly the U.S. Air Force's huge Clark air base north of here. In the last 10 days the dark area has been the scene of four major armed robber- ies, including one in which two American housewives were abducted at gunpoint1 Invade Parliament Grounds and left tied in a cane field. Full details of the new se- curity arrangements were not immediately disclosed. Santos told newsmen Philippine na- tional police troopers would be assigned for the first time to patrol just outside the boun- daries of the major bases. Boy, 13, Dies of Hunting Injury Russell Dicdrich, 13, son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Diedrich, 1320 S. Lawe st., who was accidentally shot by a hunting companion in Oconto county Sunday, died about p.m., today at an Antigo hospital. The boy had been on the critical list since the acci- dent, although it was re- ported this morning his con- dition had improved slight- ly. sugar The Argentine born revolu- tionary turned banker by Cas- tro said he expects even fur- ther tightening of imports be- cause of the foreign exchange situation. Asked by Revolucion to' Trials, Executions Still on in Hungary, UN Report Asserts No Change in Situation to Warrant-Relaxation in Interest Jensen, former U.N. political officer, who was fired last year in connection with a U.N. inquiry into the Hungar- ian problem. One of the reasons for his dismissal was his refusal to turn over to his superiors a list of Hungarian refugees who had given information in comment on unrest among-secret to the U. N. fact-find- Havana bank depositors when his appointment was announc- ed yesterday, Guevara said rumors that he-planned sub- stantial changes in the gov- e r n m e n t financial setup ing committee. The general assembly is expected to debate the Hun- gariaa problem- next spite sharp communist bloc protests that such discussions will aggravate the apparent Turn to Page 8, Col. 6 were logical but unjustified. "They are logical because the replacement of the ex- president of the bank, Felipe Pazos (a conservative) by one who is famous as an ex-1 J trcme radical is certain Of rCITQI raise in the mind of bank de- positors that I am going to take, measures against their he said. 'But, they are he continued, "because this 2 Jap Youths Attack on Teacher United Nations, N. Y., A special United Nations rep- resentative reported today there was no visible change in the Hungarian situation which would warrant relaxation of U.N. interest and concern. This declaration was made by Sir Leslie Munro of New Zealand, former president of the general assembly. He was named last year to use his influence to end alleged repres- sions which started in Hungary after the 1956 uprising. Munro said that, although he had been denied admission to Hungary there had been substantial information that trials and executions were continuing. He also asserted there was an "imminent pos- sibility of further executions." The report was made public amid a flurry of excitement over the death of Povl Bang- Income Tax Cut Sought U. S. Chamber of Commerce Urges Immediate Action Washington The U. S. Chamber of Commerce today urged an 'immediate income tax cut. A statement, reporting ac- tions this week by the chamber's board of directors, said such cuts are virtually needed to stabilize the dollar and promote econo m i c growth. It said they could be ex' pected to stir up so much new business activity that they would increase the govern- ment's revenue soon, and added: The immediate loss of rev- enue would be about S3i bil- lion a year and this could be offset by a temporary sales tax applied across the board at a low uniform rate The chamber directors Tokyo -tti- Two Japanese I behind iiversitv student, bl11 as the Rests After Setting Record In Light Plane Max Conrad Flies Miles From N. Africa to Texas Las Vegas Max Con- rad took a rest in this desert resort today after flying a light plane to a nonstop dis- tance record from north Af- rica to Texas. Conrad, 56, landed yester- day at El Paso miles from where he coaxed his gas-heavy piper Comache in- to the air at Casablanca more than two days before. The 56 hour 26 minute flight in the little blue and white monoplane was a record for planes weighing under pounds. Then, after a bottle of pop and a walk to shake out the kinks, Conrad climbed back into his plane and took off again this time for his home in San Francisco. He landed shortly before sun- down at Las Vegas. Engine Replaced Conrad flew the same plane in which he set a record for heavier aircraft last year from north Africa to Los Angeles. On this flight, he replaced the Comanche's six cylinder engine with a four cylinder model and put it in a lighter class. In El Paso, a lean and thirsty Conrad swung his long legs out of "the cramped cock- pit and told waiting reporters this story of his record-shat- tering hop: He took off from Casablan- Turn to Page 8, Col. 1 rontier Parliament Backs Him in Stand Toward China; Menon Will Not Resign BY HENRY S. BRADSHER New Delhi The Indian parliament's lower house ov- erwhelmingly endorsed Prime Minister Nehru's handling of the border crisis with communist China today after India'i veteran leader told it to either support him or replace him. Only one or two "nos" v-ere heard in the thunderous voice vote which approved Nehru's policies. The prime minister declared his policy of seeking a settle- ment by mediation is not appeasement and bluntly told par- liament he was ready to resign if it wanted another leader. The packed house rang with cheers of support as he assert- ed: "But if, house feels university students were un- der arrest today in connection cooperation of money holders without tion." any compiSsive ac- WeeklyJob Benefits Boosted to Top Madison Wisconsin! grounds Leftist Jap Students Riot Against U. S. Ties can teacher at St. Paul's uni- versity here. Newspaper reports said one of the youths struck Dr. Per- ry on the head and face last vehicle for the proposed tax cuts. The bill, introduced by Drunken Drivers Since Jan. 1 Reps. A. S.Herlong, Jr., 322. Ronald W. Coley, 25, of 1213 W. Parkway boulevard, Fla) and Howard H. Baker! 323- Raymond Van Asten, 34, of 216 E. Ninth street, (R-Tenn) is before the house ways and means committee which is now making a gener- Kaukauna. 324. Vallie W. Kramer, 47, in balance, this this government, this prime minister has got to face the challenge, then help him, and stand by him." Menon Won't Quit Earlier in the debate De- fense Minister V. K. Krsihna Menon rejected opposition de- mands that he resign and Nehru took the floor to sup- port his cabinet officer. Menon, who has been ac- cused .of too close friendship with the Peiping regime and with4reating the border trou- ble too lightly, declared all necessary troops movements consistent with India's re- sources have been made to defend the country's border with red China. "There is no question of our running from any de- Turn to Page 8, Col. 4 Morocco Given American Arms Rabat, Morocco Half a million dollars worth of Am- erican weapons were formal- ly handed over today to Crown Prince Moulay Hass- an, chief of staff of the Mor- Gronouski New State Tax Head Nelson Appoints Research Expert To Succeed Harder Madison Gov. Gay- lord Nelson today named John A. Gronouski, a tax search cialist, place Harder state tax com- missioner. Hard whose 6 year term expired in July, will return to civil service status Gronouski and assume the presently va- cant post of chief of the tax department's division of ad- ministration. The 40-year-old Gronouski fias been research director of the tax department since ear- ly this year. He also served as executive director of the tax impact report now being ocean armed forces by U.S. studied by Nelson.s A TYI TtT _ after he admonished, the pair for throwing rocks at his home and entering the university campus wh i 1 e drunk. Another St. Paul's teacher, Nobumoto Takuma, rushed to the American's aid and turn- ed the students over to police. Dr. Perry died at his home a short time later of a brain were i hemorrhage. The youths, identified as tax of 20U Main street, Neenah. (Story on Page A-7.) Icrown prince. Ambassador Charles W. Yost. "This contribution to the defense capacity of Morocco is intended to confirm the continued interest on the part of the United States in Morocco and the traditional friendship that exists between Americans and Yost said at the ceremony. In view of the imminence of President Eisenhower's vi- sit to Morocco, Dec.' 22, the American gesture is of ex- Report Is Challenged Tokyo Thousands of out. and the grounds chanting, shouting Japanese [Cleared by 7 p.m. v------r rcrpd "thrmiPh Tnkvo In the 1952 May day riot an Setsuji Mori and Teruo Yoko-' surged through Tokyo was thrown'yama, both 19, GEOFFREY GOULD today and invaded the mto the moat of thc emperor'sjDaito Cultural Washington The pub-'cer. of the parliament palace and a number of which adjoins St. health service has issued a' Surgeon General Sees Smoking As Main Cause of Lung Cancer jthe rising rate of lung was attacked by tobac- co interests as a warmed overipanions ber citizens' committee on tax revision. Confirmation Needed Gro'nouski's appointment to the a year post is sub- ject to senate confirmation. Harder will get A native of Dunbar in Mar- inette county, Gronouski spent his boyhood in Osh- kosh. He was an air force navigator in 'World war II. Pie holds three degrees from the University of Wis- consin, including a doctorate received in 1955. Before joining the Wiscon- sin tax agency, he worked on the Michigan tax study and taught finance at Wayne uni- versity in Detroit. Youth Shot Twice by Same Deer Hunter Wausau A Schofield man, shot twice Thursday by will boost unemployment building, demanding an end Jean cars were burned. This'an Episcopal institution. No The statement was issued rehash of old statistics. benefits to a top of a f. starting in January, the state Ito milltarv ties Wlth the industrial commission said to- States, day. Police reported 371 persons This is an increase of S6iwcrc injured. 23 seriously, from the present figure and the injured were 159 results from a 1959 change in policemen. It was the most the law. The new ceiling demonstration since be based on average wages of workers in i958 and 1959 and will apply only to new bene- fit determinations in 1960. time there was no anti-Ameri- charges were filed against ca violence. I them immediately. smoking is the main cause of Leroy E. Burney in the form hunter as shouted in protest, was in serious condition at strong new warning that the1 CM, weight of evidence implicates vcsterday by Surgeon Gen. Dr. C. C. Little, scientific'Wausau Memorial hospital to- director of the tobacco indus- Porf er Writes For Average Reader on Money Miss Sylvia Porter writes about money but in everyday mean- ing to the average wage earner, the small business- man, the new investor. No high finance or internation- al banking problems for her. Crescent. We think you'll want to make her column a habit throughout the com- ing year. the 1952 May day riot, in which one Japanese was kill- ed and 500 were injured. Twice thc leftist-led estimated at 20.000 to stormed into the parliament grounds and exultantly pa- raded the red banners of the SOHYO Labor federation while the lawmakers sat in- side. "This unprecedented ,rcd flags in the diet (parlia- said SOHYO Sec. Gen. Akira Iwai exultantly. Communists, socialist, stu- dents and teachers participat- ed. Violence Grows The demonstration, at first peaceful and orderly, turned violent when police offered to Read Sylvia Porter on lct a ijmjtcd number inside Page B-7 of tonight's Post- (the parliament grounds to prc-, t a petition attacking the Japan-U.S. mutual defense pact. Thc crowd surged forward, broke thc police lines at thc main gate, and poured into thc grounds. Most of those hurt were injured in the en TODAY'S INDEX Comics B 8 Deaths A 7 Editorials A 4 Entertainment A15 House A16 Kaukauna A 5 Sports A12 Weather Map B 9 Twin Cities' B 1 injured suing melee. There was also a brief clash between .the left- ists and a rightist group. The police cleared the grounds, but later more dem- onstrators poured over the low walls. As night began to fall, lead- ers urged the demonstrators of an article in the Journal of try research committee, said the American Medical associ-jin New York the in ation. It was the govern- [Burney's article were "first mcnt's strongest statement to advanced some years ago in date linking smoking and statistical studies that admit- day. Damon Dahlman, 20, was struck first in the neck by a hunter's ricocheting bullet. Dahlman's companions told sheriff's officers they ran to- ward the man who had fired cancer, and Burney said it'tedly are not supported by the gun. shouting, "Look out, was based partly on new evi- dence. Burncy's warning Immedi- 165 Deaths on U.S. Highways Thus Far Over Long Holiday By Thc Associated Press Traffic deaths during the extended Thanksgiving holi- day continued a slow move- ment upward today. There, were 165 traffic fatal- experimental evidence." At Appomattox, Va., Burney Watkins Abbitt Little who represents a major tobacco itics, 16 persons died in fires growing district, said "it is and 35 in miscellaneous acci- shocking that a supposedly dents, a total of 216. .responsible government offi- Whether the reason was un-idal would the entire usual weather or the Ameri- tobacco industry on such can tradition of staying close fhmsy statistical evidence." I to home on this holiday, the! 0 ,sts death count was slow. Burncy's article took note Snow, sleet, powerful winds of Sequent criticisms of the and rain raked many sections linking smoking and of the country from 6 p.m. lung.cancer. He cited Little s Wednesday onward when Prcvious criticisms specifical- the count of deaths from un- y- AP Wlrrphelo Bryan Hogan, 17, Sits with blanket-wrapped Timothy Golden, 8, in the Golden home, Chicago, after Hogan had rescued the boy from Diamond lake Thursday. Hogan smashed a path through ice with his fists, swam 200 feet out into the lake and brought Timothy back to shore, Timothy had run out on the ice and crashed info water 15-feet deep. usual causes began. The count will end at midnight (local time) Sunday. Thc Associated Press _ a survey of fatalities during a recent 4-day non-holiday pe- riod. Traffic deaths then to- taled 433, fires 49 and 100 from miscellaneous causes. This to- taled 582. But Burney noted that by law thc public health service must tell the medical profes- the public about affecting public (anything health. After reviewing the presently available evidence in detail, he said "thc public health service believes that Turn to Page 8, CoL 2 we haven't got horns, have The man, they said, fired again, felling Dahlman with a bullet to the chest. Alex Cibula, 32. of Hatley was taken into custody, but was not charged immediately. He told authorities he was shooting at a large deer. Snow Adds Flavor to Yule Season Shopping Wisconsin Snow to end today. Saturday partly cloudy with somewhat high- er afternoon temperatures. Outlook for Sunday: Partly cloudy to cloudy and a little warmer, with snow or snow flurries likely northwest portion. Applcton Temperatures for thc 24-hour period end- ing at 9 a.m. today: High 29, low 21. Temperature at 10 a.m. today 26. Barometer reading 30.16 inches, with wind north and northwest four miles an hour. Precip- itation in light snow meas- ures one inch. Sun sets at p.m., ris- es Saturday at a.m.; moon rises Saturday at a.m. Prominent stars is Fomalhaut and Procyon. Visible planets are Saturn and Venus. 1EWSP4PERS NF'WSPAPFPJ   

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