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Appleton Post Crescent Newspaper Archive: October 15, 1959 - Page 1

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   Appleton Post-Crescent (Newspaper) - October 15, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                               APPLETON POST CRESCENT VOL.LINo.95 APPLETON-NEENAH-MENASHA, WIS., THURSDAY, OCTOBER ASSOCIATED PRESS WIRE SERVICE Price Seven Cents Fire Checked Near Los Angeles Suburb 3 Families Forced to Flee Homes (Picture on Page 2) Los foothill brush fire burned to within 100 yards of a group of homes near suburban Altadena today but a massed array of pumper trucks succeeded in checking the flames. Three families were evacu- ated temporarily, but barring the unexpected, firemen said the threat to Altadena was more potential than immedi- ate. x Meanwhile the -3.200-acre fire, completely out of control for the second day, burned most furiously along a four-j mile front on its northeast' edge. This front is in a wilder- ness area of Angeles Na- tional forest in the San Gabriel' mountains, far from any structures. j It was burning toward les Crest highway. It wasj alongside this highway, lowerj in the hills, that the fire start- ed from a carelessly flipped cigaret. College Evacuated Last night, to the west on thei opposite side of Los Angeles', another brush fire flared brief- ly. It was near Mount St. Mary's college m the Santa Monica mountains. The col- lege was evacuated as a pre- cautionary measure, but the blaze was contained before doing any damage. It charred acres. Fifteen hundred men and 18 tanker planes, dropping fire retarding borate solution, fought the Angeles forest blaze. Control still was a question mark. "It looks like it'll take a couple of days at least. We haven't had much ram at all the last few years and I've never seen thc brush so dry. "This stuff doesn't burn it explodes." 'Copf er Finds Missing Child In Swampland New coast guard helicopter found a wet and shocked 9-year-old girl in a swampland eight hours aft- er a furloughed mental pa- tient abducted her in his car. She was unharmed. Ernest Bordenave, Jr., 22, of suburban Gretna said he did not know why he picked up frail Lona Anne Robert- son yesterday on her way to school in Gretna. Police charged him with aggravated kidnaping, aggravated bat- tery, and molesting a juve- nile. Bordenave said he planned to drive to Venice, La., but his car ran out of gasoline. He abandoned it on a .desert- ed road near a canal separat- ing Plaque'mines and Jeffer- son parishes. "When I parked I made her get out of the car with he said. "I told her to be qui- et. A little later I saw police looking at my car. "I went into the woods. La- ter I left her in a clump of trees." Errol Flynn's Death Laid to Heart Attack Actor Stricken While He Visits Apartment of Friends Vancouver British Columbia Errol Flynn. whose real life adventures 'often outdid i s swashbuckling movie roles, died last night m an Governor Signs Huge 1959-61 Road Budget Calls for Total Appropriation of Over Gaylord Nelson today signed the 1959- highway budget calling for a total appropriation of The motor vehicle depart- ment's share is About 38 per cent of the to- tal outlay comes from federal aid. The remainder is drawn dough and his 17-year-old state revenues segregat- actor was en route to the air- port with Mr. Snd Mrs. Cal- apartment where he had drop- ped in for a drink. He appar- ently suffered a heart attack. "He died said Mrs. George Caldough, Flynn's hostess during a visit here. "He was having a good time and enjoying himself." The greying, 50-year-old Errol Flynn AP tege, Beverly Aadland. Mrs. Caldough said he com- plained of a pain in the back and the man they were visit- ing, Dr. Grant Gould, took him into another room for re- lief. He lost consciousness while the doctor was out of the room for a moment, she said. Fails to Revive An inhalator crew worked over Flynn for 57 minutes and then he was taken by ambu- jlance to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead on ar- rival. Miss Aadland. who rode to the hospital in the ambulance, was placed under sedation. said Flynn on his arrival here six days ago, "well, that speaks for itself. I like young women because they give you a feeling of youth." He came to negotiate for the sale of his yacht Zaca. Caldough reportedly was in- terested in the luxury vessel. Flynn's dashing manner both on and off the screen raised the blood pressure of feminine admirers and male rivals. It also brought him Turn to Page 1 2 Americans Honored Win Nobel Prize for Research in Medicine Stockholm Two Dr. Kornberg centered on the American scientists were awarded this year's Nobel Urges New Talks to Settle Steel Stri ed by law for highway use. The segregated funds include gasoline taxes and motor ve- hicle license fees. Included in the highway commisison's share is in direct aid to local units of government. A com- mission breakdown says this amounts to for every mile of country road, per town mile, and per mu- nicipal mile. Matching Funds The appropriation also in- cludes more than million j matching funds to be spentl by local units on county sec-j ondary roads. j A total of a year is earmarked for state parkj roads, as recommended Nelson. This representc a 40 per cent increase over sums appropriated for the purpose in previous years. In addition, the act provides a annual appropria- tion for roadside improve- ments and a year for tourist advertising. The ad- vertising fund will be admin- istered by the conservation de- partment. Menon Scored for Stand on Tibet" New Delhi iff) India's chief U. N. delegate, V. K. Krishna Menon. has come un- der attack in the Indian press for his opposition to a Tibetan debate in the United Nations. "This is craven, hu- miliating, wicked appease- ment" of red China, the Hin- Ar Wlrephoto Adolfo Lopez Mateos, president of Mexico, gestures as he talks with former President Herbert Hoover in New York City. Lopez Mateos paid a visit to Hoover in his suite at the Waldorf Towers. The Mexican president leaves tomorrow for a visit to Canada. Municipalities Get Conflicting Ad vice on Government Aids Byrnes Claims Federal Spending For Local Work Hikes Inflation Post-Crescent News Sen-led Green Bay ties received vice Wednesday on the atti- tude its cities should take to- jmatching funds by more state Municipali- cities for planning and for ur- conflicting ad-'ban renewal. Carley's refer- 4 Killed in Blast At Camp Alamos Los Alamos, N.M. chemical structural pattern of heredity, notably the key prize in medicine for pioneer) substances of DNA (dcsoxyri- research into the basic bonucleic acid) and RNA (ri- dustan Times declared in an ward trying to get fedcral ald anisms of heredity. They are Dr. Severo Ochoa bonucleic The Caroline institute said in its official citation that the two American scientists were awarded the prize "for their discoveries of the mecha- nisms in the biological syn- editorial today. It called Menon's performance "im- moral and degrading." Most newspapers agreed there is some validity in Prime Minister Nehru's stand that a debate will not help the Tibetans and therefore should not be held. But several asked why In- to-help them with their rcve- tnat only three Wisconsin cit- ence was during a report on Four men unloading high ex- industrial development prog-jplosive scraps at a dump near rcss. jthis atomic laboratory city Carley criticized the factjwere killed yesterday when Panel Head Asks Move At Hearing Washington Tha head of President Eisen- hower's inquiry 'panel on jthe steel strike today urged the industry and union, to resume direct negotiations and seek an agreement be- fore Sunday. Both the industry and union seemed to accept the suggestion m a by panel j Chairman George W. Taylor at the windup of the panel's hearings. But no immediate negotiating arrange m e n t s were made. The nation wants a settle- ment soon of the damaging strike, Taylor lectured both sides. He said that if they are un- able to reach agreement by negotiation, they should con- sider submitting their diffcr- j ences to arbitration, or a decision by outside neutrals. Prefer to Negotiate First, R-. Conrad Cooper, U. S. Steel corporation execu- tive, and then Union Presi- dent David J. McDonald re- plied that they preferred ne- gotiations rather than arbitra- tion. "I am in the mood to bar- gain collectively to try to reach an McDon- ald said. Cooper similarly said that the industry frowned on arbi- tration and wanted to negoti- ate its settlement. Taylor, in a summary of how the panel viewed the case so far, said there are two rnain roadblocks thwarting a settlement. He said these are the work rule changes demanded by the industry designed to promote operating nue problems. Delivering the mam dress to the league afternoon] since ies are among the which received million 1954 in planning aids. Ul I.OO Hit j---------- I--------------Q convention session at the pointed out that an act of tel Northland, Rep. John Byrnes, a Republican, lec- tured that federal spending for local functions was in- inflation. harming thesis of ribonucleic acid question without hope of dia should adopt this attitude j creasing when it never hesitated to the economy, and threatening raise the South African ra- the historical balance be- desoxynbonucleic acid.' 'practical effect. of the New York Universityj College of Medicine, New York, and Dr. Arthur Korn- berg of Stanford university, California. The decision was taken by the Swedish Royal Caroline Institute of Medicine and Physiology this afternoon. The reward signaled an ex- plosive biochemical advance in the basic scientific level of heredity. The prize this year is worth Swedish crowns Directed Verdict Frees Murder Case Defendant Chelsea, Vt. Murder! charges were dismissed today against two men indicted in the vigilante slaying of New-: bury dairy farmer Orville A. Gibson, 47. Robert Ozro Welch, 46 year old school janitor, was freed by a directed verdict without a single defense witness be- with success his appeal for a directed verdict of acquittal. Reed rested his case yester- day after putting in evidence from two key witnesses against Welch. tween federal and local gov- ernments Use Federal Funds "It is no wonder that the trip to Washington has be- come popular. This route sub- stitutes the sweetness of fed- eral money for the bitterness of increased local Byrnes said. An hour earlier, David Car- ley, director of the state di- vision of industrial develop- ment, an appointee of Demo- cratic Gov. Gaylord Nelson, had urged the use of federal the past congressional session raised eligibility to cities of population from a pre- vious maximum of Byrnes made it clear exact- Turn to Page 10, Col. 3 the material exploded. Officials said no radioactive material was involved. High explosives, like TNT, are used in many experiments in de- veloping atomic weapons. The victims were Leopoldo Pachcco, 50, San Juan Pueb- lo; Sevedeo Lujan, 53, Santa Fe, and Jose C. Cordova, 37, and Escolastico Martinez, 47, both of Chimayo. New Arms Proposal U. S. to Offer Own Plan At Meeting in Geneva United Nations, N.Y_ Ishchev's total disarmament and the matter of wage and benefit increases for the strikers. McDonald said earlier he has seen no progress so far toward settlement of the steel strike, now in its 93rd day. Newsmen asked McDonald, during a recess in. hearings by the inquiry board, wheth- er there was any basis for optimism as to a settlement. McDonald said. "Ev- erything is status quo." Carley Named as Head of State Resource Agency Madison David Car- ley, 31. state industrial devel- opment division director, was nominated Thursday to head the newly created depart- Word circulated today the United States will The appointment, by Gov. that proposal goes before the 10J Gaylord Nelson, is subject to pre- nation cast-west committee in'senate confirmation. sent a rival arms plan whcniGeneva. Soviet Premier Nikita Khru-i Sources close to the U. S. Carley was research direc- tor of the Wisconsin State Guesf Writers Fill In for John Wyngaard John Wyngaard. head of the Post-Crescent Madison bureau, is on vacation. While he is away, he -is giving members of our state government the op- portunity pf reporting on their activities in his col- umn. You'll find a direct re- port from a member of your government on the editorial page. For a clos- er look at activities in Mad- ison, don't miss "Under the Capitol Dome." as pre- sented by of Wyn- guard's guest writers. The money comes from jng called ventbr of dynamite. The against the other man, Frank- prizes first were awarded in'W. Carpenter, 43, who had 1901 and are given for chem-ibccn scheduled to go on trial istry, physics, literature, asnaicr i well as in the field of medi-1' AU Gcn Fredcrlck Mj cine and physiology. In addi- _. i timi there is the Nobel peace Rced told the court at thc prize. elusion that if he had been Americans also won the free to decide the question, prize for medicine last year, himseff he might not have! They were George Beadle, proceeded with the Welch i Edward Tatum and Joshua prosecution. Ledcrberg. for their work in Not Displeased I genetics. "The state is not in any way The work of Dr. Ochoa and dissatisfied with what was de- cided here today." Reed said.] Welch rose from his seat at his counsel table as the jury, rendered its directed verdict, of acquittal. Welch's wife, son two daughters rushed to his 7_ side as the foreman intoned Phoenix Girl Found Locked in Small Bedroom for 2 Years Phoenix, Ariz. year-old Phoenix girl, suffer-'tnc verdict ordered by the irig from severe malnutrition, was in the county hospital to- f Carpenter had been a spec-, day after spending thc iasttator throughout tfclchs _ r Rnfh hoon (rrto An! TODAY'S INDEX Comics D 9 Deaths C 7 Editorials A 8 Entertainment C 6 vacation Food Section C 8 Kaukauna BIO Sports D 1 Women's Section C 1 Weather Map DID Twin Cities B 1 two years locked in a small bedroom. Bonnie Marie Shelton weigh- ed only 28 pounds when ad- mitted to the hospital yester- She's 38 inches tall. Doc- tors said she should be 46 inches tall and weigh about 55 pounds. Her Mrs. Ruth Shel- ton, 31, arrested on a tip from a relative, was charged with contributing to thc delinquen- cy of a minor. Officers indi- cated additional charges may be filed later. men have been free on bail of each. Gibson's trussed body was found in the Connecticut riv- er three months after he van- ished from his Newbury farm, Dec. 31, 1957. The previous Christmas day he had beaten a frail hired hand and there was resent- ment in the small community. Defense Counsel Henry Black at first sought a direct- ed verdict in the Welch case. When Judge Natt L. Divoli, Jr., did not rule on it Black rested his case and renewed Mrs. Duane Vincent, Right, and Mrs. William S. Jenncss embrace Wlrephoto in Seattle, Wash., after Mrs. Vincent was released from the hospital where her sight was re- stored because Mrs. Jenness' son willed his eyes to a hospital. Bobby Jenness, 12, was killed in a" traffic accident Sept. 30. Mrs. Vincent said the first thing she wanted to do after her release was to meet Mrs. Jenness and thank her for her son's gift. delegation to the U. N. said) Chamber of Commerce for American disarmament ex-jfive years. He has headed the perts are working quietly industrial development divi- with the state department on sion since March 9. ja plan covering the whole A former citizen member 'arms question as well as the and secretary of the legisla- jthorny problem of adequatettive council's urban develop- controls. committee, he also U. S. Ambassador Henry served as a member of the jCabot Lodge hinted some Madison Metropolitan Devel- such move was afoot whentopment Committee from 1956- jhe spoke in the disarmament 53 j (debate before thc U.X. as- As head of the new re- isembly's mam political com-'source development agency, mittee yesterday. Carley's salary would be Arms Review a year. The length of Lodge noted that President thc tcrm is indefinite, since Eisenhower has set in motion tnc director serves at tha a concentrated disarmament pleasure of thc governor, review which will prepare the United Slates to participate "constructively" in the Gene- Rain va talks, slated to open aft- P P er the assembly ends. Friday forecast Informants stressed that Wisconsin-Mostly cloudy the United States will not prc- over thc cntirc stale tonight, sent any arms plan before the general assembly this ses- sion but will wait for the Ge- neva parley. Thc U.S. feelingi Jis that detailed consideration of thc Khrushchev plan and all other arms proposals is thc job of thc 10-nation com- jmiUec which has been set up outside the U.N. to try to break the east-west disarma- ment deadlock. It was noted that the Unit-! ed States has not endorsed, I the step-by-step disarmament, plan put forth at the begin- ning of the assembly session by British Foreign Sec. Scl- wyn Lloyd. Lodge Stressed that this, too, should be threshed out at Geneva. Lodge told the assembly that some agency such as an inttrnational police force would be necessary lo pre- serve peace after disarma- ment. with light ram possible, mixed xvith some snow, be- ginning over the northwest p o r t i o n and gradually spreading soutncast. Cooler Friday. Outlook for Satur- day: Mostly cloudy with light snow flurries north. Colder most sections. Applcton Temperatures for the 24-hour period end- ing 9 a.m. today: High 46. low 41. Temperature at 10 a.m. today 50. with dis- comfort index at 47. Baro- meter reading 29.09 inches with wind caTM. Precipita- tion Wednesday .05 of an inch. Sun sets at p.m., rises Friday at a.m moon rises at p.m. Full moon Fnday. Prominent star is Aldobaran. Visible planets Jupiter, Saturn and Venus. M.   

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