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Appleton Post Crescent: Thursday, October 1, 1959 - Page 1

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   Appleton Post-Crescent (Newspaper) - October 1, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                               APPLETON POST CRESCENT VOL. LI No. 83 52 A, B, C, D APPLETQN-NEENAH-MEN ASH A, WIS., THURSDAY, OCTOBER ASSOCIATED PRESS WIRE SERVICE Price Seven Cents Dock Workers in Surprise Walkout Ignore U. S. Plea; Many Ships Idle New work- ers ignored government pleas today and staged a surprise walkout in many eastern and gulf coast ports, stranding scores of cargo vessels. Officials of the Independent International Longshoremen's association predicted all the ILA's stevedores on the two coasts would be on strike within hours as orders reach- ed them from New York. A full-scale walkout would virtually halt all cargo ship- ping on the two coasts, as have similar strikes in the past. However, in the first few hours of the strike the situa- tion was spotty. Cargo hand- lers were reported still on the job in the Carolinas. Georgia and Florida as contract nego- tiations with employers con- tinued in those areas. U. S. Seeks Delay The major ports of New York. Boston, Baltimore and some other new England areas were all but at a stand- still. Ljtimates of the num- ber of ships affected in New York ranged from 157 to 190. New England listed them in dozens. Baltimore had about two dozen with cargoes, plus 16 more in shipyards. Phila- delphia counted 18. The gulf coast reported scat- tered tieups. The sudden walkout came with the nation's economy al- ready beginning to feel the pinch of the long steel strike. With this in mind, the govern- ment had sought to stave it off but members disgruntled shouldered' union aside New Talks Started in Steel Dispute Both Sides Become More Active Under White House Prodding BY JOHN MOODY Pittsburgh Steel negotiators, under White House first and White Sox Lead Dodgers, 9 to 0, In 4th Inning Craig Knocked Out; Kluszewski Homers in 7-Run Third 2-run homer by Ted Kluszewski and threej errors by Los Angeles sent the Chicago White Sox into a 9-0 lead over the Dodgers today after 3i innings of the first world series game. The Dodgr ers' starting pitcher, Roger Craig, was replaced by "Chuck" Churn. The Sox scored two in the 11 Killed as Torn Hits Virginia Ha seven in the -third Wynn off to a blazing start. crowd estimated at close to' pressure to end the 79-day-old steel strike before Oct. send right bander Early' opened a new round of contract talks today. Both United Steelworkers President David J. McDonald n_. watched the Comiskey1 and industry negotiator R. Conrad Cooper appeared in good parj- garne jn SUnny, cool, spirits as they arrived for the meeting. They joked briefly with newsmen but otherwise had no comment. The talks were scheduled to resume at 10 a. m. but were delayed for at least one hour. A union spokesman said the Grade Ends Her Existence 24 Deaths May be Attributed to Tropical Storm industry requested the delay Wynn worked out of trouble. Landis Singles In the Sox first, Fox walked with one out. Landis singled him to third. Kluszewski sin- because some members of the negotiating team were late in arriving from Wash- two sides ington where the met yesterday. The strike has idled a, half Both teams were retired million members of the Unit- ordcr in lhe second. weather. In the first inning the Dodg-j ers put two men on Charlie Neal singled and; Duke Snider glcd to score Fox and send Landis to third. Lollar flied lo left' field, scoring Landis. in ed Steelworkers in the basic i [steel industry. In addition, nearly employes in al- Philadelphia cal storm Gracie, the hour, headed Tropi- dying by northeast- last-minute arrangements to keep work going. A federal mediator quickly called for further negotiations here today on a contract to replace a pact expiring at Turn to Page-6, Col. 2 Canadian Boy, 14, Guilty of Murder Goderich, ven Truscott, 14-year-old son of an air force warrant offi- cer, was convicted last night of murder in-the rape-slay ing j of a- playmate. Lynne Harp- er, 12. He was sentenc be hanged Dec..8. The jury, which pondered for nearly three hours, at- tached a recommendation of mercy to its decision. In most cases such a recommenda- tion, particularly when it in- volves one so young, results in commutation of the sen- ward to its grave today after giving birth to a tornado and taking 21 lives, possibly 24. Gracie, which first struck the U.S. mainland in South Carolina Tuesday, moved in- to southwestern Pennsylva- nia between Unioutown and Morgantown, W. Va., late last night. It swept eastward Pennsylvania, dumping up to three inches of rain Li some isolated spots. Basements Nelson Fox doubled with one out in the big Sox third. Jim Landis singled, scoring Fox. 10 Members Of Family Victims Charlottesville. A tornado born of a dying hurricane dropped like a bomb on the sleepy little community of Ivy near here yesterday. Eleven persons died, 10 of them" members of the same fam- ily- The savage twister swoop- ed down out of torrential rain produced by tropical storm Gracie about p. m., two hours after a relatively minor tornado had struck not far away. Twelve of the 14 members of the families of Erwin Mor- AP wirrphoto jrjs> sr.. about 48, and his son, Junior Gilliam of the Los Angeles Dodgers faces White Sox pitcher Early jjErvin Morris, Jr., 21, were Wynn as the first pitch of the World Series comes over the plate for a called at home in lhe duPlex strike at Comiskey park in Chicago. Catcher is' Sherm Lollar and Bill Summers is the umpire. Kluszewski hit a home run in- lied industries have been fur- lo the right field scats loughed. Ike Spurs Action The negotiations, held negotiations, New York until now, Snider, Moon Collide Churn replaced Craig. Duke m Snider collided with Wally 'Moon and dropped Sherm Lol- were ]ar-s {ly for a 2-base error. broken fiff last Friday by the'Billy Goodman singled scor- union, which claimed the'ing Lollar. Al Smith doubled, talks were getting nowhere. The decision to resume the. smith talks was made in Wasliin'g-j error. .and Goodman scored on Sm- thrQW past second reaching third on the were roads flooded washed and out several in Erie. High waters in Meadville re- portedly caused a power fail- city. ure, darkening half the In addition to the Ivy deaths, Gracie killed seven persons in South Carolina, two in Florida and one each ton yesterday after the presi-j dent talked with union and in- dustry leaders in separate meetings. He reportedly told 'both sides in firm language that he wanted collective bar- gaining to continue. The president, who has re- ferred to the strike as an in-] tolerable situation, reportedly! did not discuss issues during the meetings. He also avoided discussing Jim Rivera bounced to Neal, who threw into the dirt trying to nab Smith at the plate, Smith scoring and Rivera reaching second on the error. Wynn doubled to the left cen- ter field wall, scoring Rivera. Romania Accused Of Jailing Jews Jerusalem Wl Israel's chief rabbi, Izhak Nissim, in Emergency in Hew Jersey Encephalitis Cases Lead to War on Mosquitoes Mays Landing-, N.J. Gasoline Tank Explodes an outbreak, of encephalitis! has been declared in Hamil- ton township a 115-square this shared. Nine perished almost instantly, their bodies thrown with explosive force upon a wooded hillside. The remain- ing three were injured. A hundred yards distant the roof blew off the house Raymond C. Bruce, 58, as he and his wife Lilly, 56, and their son sought refuge in the kitchen. A stone chimney top- pled and Mrs. Bruce was kill- ed. Heard Roar "I heard a roaring up the back orchard it sounded Charleston, S. C. Ajeffort to put out the a train- I saw Envin storage tank containing were oniy trying to pre- coming off my said Bruce, who with his son suf-' 2 Houses Razed, 9 Persons Injured million gallons of gasoline ycnl u from spreading ploded with a thunderous roar terminal here today. Six of the injured were in one of the two small houses The blast demolished were demolished. Only mile area that includes Atlantic county seat and the! Atlantic city race course. In declaring the township Mayor Herman G. Liepe yesterday called for an all-out war on mosquitoes. He asked for the aid of the civil defense officials. fire departments, road employes, small frame houses a at jaway. and injured 'nine persons. i The blast touched block least off spectacular fire that threat- the possibility of invoking... Jewish xcw Years' messagcjand marine 'reservists armed emergency provisions of the ]2St night accused communist Taft-Hartley act which would put the mills back in opera- in Georgia and North lina. for an 'off" period. 80-day "cooling fo Arrive in Strife Region Fact-Finders Land in North Laos District Sam Ncua, Laos A Romania of "jailing Jews whose only crime is a desire lo return to their families." Rabbi Nissim did not go in- to details. In a Tel Aviv news conference yesterday repre- sentatives of the Romanian Immigrants association claimed that recently 120 for- mer "Zionist prisoners" had been re-arrested in Romania, and that a number of other Jews had been arrested after they tried to assist needy friends wanting to make prep- jarations for emigration to Is- tence to life imprisonment fact-finding team landed the federal cabinet. Lynne Harper, daughter of a "Royal Canadian Air Force flying officer, vanished June 9 from the vicinity of her home. Her body was found in a woodlot two days later. at this rebel-threatened north- ern defense headquarters to- day to start on-the-spot inves- tigation into charges of red a'ggression against the king- dom of Laos. The team's twin-engine Da- the youngsters' par-ikota, flying a tiny U.N. flag, Warrant Officer and [landed on the narrow airstrip Both ents Mrs. Daniel Truscott and Flight Officer and Mrs. Les- lie Harper live with their families at the Clinton RCAF station near Goderich. Charlie House Begins 100-Mile Walk Today Charlie House, the liter- ary Johnny Applesecd of the Applelon Post-Cres- cent, has taken off on an- other of his reporting as- signments.' This time, House will re- peat a performance which brought him national prom- inence several years ago. Loaded with copy paper and camera, House will start a 100-mile walking trip from Omro to Suring today.' Along the way he'll inter- view interesting people, write about historical high- lights of the area and take a deep look at the heart- land of northeastern Wis- consin. Expected to take better than a week, the walking jaunt will be reported daily in his "On the House" col- umn. INDEX Comics D 5 Deaths A12 Editorials A 8 Kaukauna D 6 Sports 1 Television BIO Women's Section B 1 Weather Map, A1S Twin Cities C 1 he did not know whether the'.rael. Laotians planned to carry out1 original plans to fly the group Bohlen Prepares to also to Muong Het and _ _ pests in the Nam Ma Manila Oct. 15 The valley, which runs paral- lel to the winding Viet Nam border, has been a staging area for the rebels in northern Sam Neua province. The Lao- Manila Ambassador Charles E. Bohlen is sched- uled to leave Manila Oct. 15 lo take up his new post as a state department adviser on of this mountain rimmed stronghold a' little more than an hour afterHaking off from the capital of Vientiane, 200 miles to the south. The delegation was greeted by refugees who have fled border areas overrun by pro- communist rebels. Then came a briefing by Brig. Gen. Amk- ha Soukhavong, northern de- fense commander. Three western newsmen photographers Fred Waters of the Associated Press, Wade Bingham of thc Columbia Broadcasting System and John Dominis of Life maga- zine managed to fly north in other planes. Others Stalled The remainder of more than 20 correspondents who came to Laos to cover thei team's activities were stalled' in Vientianne by mysterious orders barring them from all; aircraft under the Laotian army's jurisdiction. It was generally assumed here that the U.N. officials, who have been operating un- der strictest secrecy since] they arrived in Laos two weeks ago. were responsible. They declined comment on the restrictions. The mission to Sam Ncua was made up of eight men, three delegates and five members of the U.N. sec- retariat. At Sam Ncua the mission was to interview refugees from Areas, overrun by pro- communist rebels along thc North Viet Nam frontier, and prisoners captured by thc Lao- tian forces. Thc Laotian gov- ernment charges the rebels are being aided by regulars from North Viet Nam. A U.N, team member-said BY TOM HOGE tian defense ministry an-iSoviet affairs, a U.S. embas- nounced yesterday that itsjsy spokesman announced to- forces had recaptured thejday. valley, but the key position of I Bohlen and nis family book- Muong Son, at the foot of the Jed passage on a plane to To- valley, was reported still un- kyo. He had said he would like priority when der harassing rebel attacks, a brief leave in Japan. with a flamethrower. Grassy sections are to ened other tanks containing millions of gallons of fuel. 3 Miles From Town The fire was still burning hours after the ex- Shortly before noon, reported that a one of the injured was believ- ed seriously hurt. The Esso plant is abouf three miles from the down- burned sprayed. and The water holes! flamethrower to burn out will be used ditches. The township has also asked Ft. Dix to supply it with a chemical smoke gen- erator to throw up a fatal smokescreen against the mosquitoes. Mosquitoes are suspected to be carriers of encephalitis, a kind of sleeping sickness. the fire to the nearest tank (300 feet away. Firemen were making no Drunken Drivers Since Jan. 1 260. Robert J. Lorn, 25, Com- bined Locks. (Story on Page town area of this port city that was badly battered Tues- day by Hurricane Gracie. There apparently were two explosions. Jeff King, who j lives near the Esso plant, said, "The first explosion shook the whole house. I jumped out of bed and looked out the window. The second explosion went, so I took off." Dikes Hold Fuel Firemen from the Charles- ton Navy yard aided city fire- men in the battle against the Ihuge blaze. Fire fighters could not get close because of fumes and intense heat. The hsat melted asphalt Disarmament Issue To Have UN Priority At Least 2 Groups Trying to be First On List for Assembly's Consideration fered only minor injuries. "The roof went up about 50 yards. My wife and I ran back toward the kitchen. Then the chimney came down. More of it hit my wife than me." Witnesses said the Morris duplex simply disintegrated under the assault of the twist- er. Rescuers who fought their Turn to Page 6, Col. 7 Pabst Purchase Of Blatz Faces Court Challenge Washington The jus- t i c e department Thursday challenged in court the Pabst Brewing company's absorp- tion of Blatz Brewing com- pany of Milwaukee, paving several hundred feet' In a civil complaint in the away. The gummy stuff stuck federal district court at Mil- to spectators' shoes. In the immediate of the flaming tank was'one waukee, Atty. Gen. William, vicinity asked for an order under the anti-trust laws re- containing one million gallons quiring Pabst, which has of gasoline. Also nearby were two tanks containing four million gallons of diesel fuel. Firemen battled to wet down the other tanks to keep mittee gets down to business. them cool. The sides of lank collapsed, dikes are built tank to contain such cases. headquarters at Chicago, to divest itself of Blatz's business and assets. The complaint said the merger of these two leading United Nations, N.Y. Storm is blowing up over' The caus? of Disarmament is slated the U.NT. >not determined beer-making concerns, which the burning'was completed last February, but earthenieliminated competition be- around eaclijtwcen them and also tended the fuel in; to substantially lessen com- 'petition in the whole beer the fire wasjfield. immediately.! Tiie Milwaukee suit was proposal wiu geti C. W. Matthews, plant against Pabst, Schenley sembly's main political corn- top billing. icrintendent, said he was told [Industries, Inc., of New York, At least two groups with ri- the explosion occurred in previously owned Blatz, val plans are reported ma-'opcn area and JurnPcd to the j and the Vai corporation, neuvering to head the iist'tank. He said it was describ-; Madison, Wis. disarmament cd as a blue bal1 of fjre that' Blatz brewing company's went to the-tank. !name was changed to the Val Matthews said no Esso after Pabst in ployes were injured. 1958. acquired all of About two hours after the Blatz's assets and business for a crack million in cash, S3J million storage jn debentures. shares when the five items come up for debate in the 82-nation committee. The committee starts work some timr next week, t The Russians reportedly are making a strong bid to ,anv and the entire 'V tank, ana me enure area pabst common stock, plus stock purchase warrants for an additional shares of f f ,1111 dlJUltJUMdl OiN in Theft Of iPabst common. A f R. head the agenda with Imier Nikita S. Khrushchev's .proposal for total disarma- ment within four years. Meet Opposition J.. f They are running into oppo- OOdy r sition from a large segment sioux s D _yr_ ot the Asian-African oloc bachclor Sioux Falls house For Off-'n-Qfl Coof which wants priority for Mor- painter faccs courl on a, occo s demand that France charge of thc bod ofl cancel plans for testing an u_year _old Jcan Pcnsyl from! atomic bomb m the Saharaiits srave jn a Holland. MinnJ dcsert. [cemetery the night of Sept. 8.J Also on the committee was buried that day. agenda are an Irish appeal to He is willard L. Beckstrom, restrict nuclear weapons who was servcd with a the nations that now have warranl iast night by Sheriff! them Britain, thc Stelling of j States and Russia; an Indian where Municipal Judge T. E.I call for a permanent ban on Fellows signed the complaint.! all nyclear tests and Sec. James Manion, Pipestone> Gen. Dag Hammarskjoln's ro- COUnty attorney, said officials' port on the current interna- sun had not been able to find' tional efforts al disarmament. any' trace of thc body. Britain also has broached a Stelling said Beckstrom has; 3-stage disarmament viewing Jean's bodyf that will go before the 10-na-jat the Holland church and of: lion cast-west committee slat-jwriting "to her funeral from a1 ed to start arms talks in Ge- friend" on a memorial card! AP Wlrepheto Diane Ewing, 19, Smiling as she lay on her wheel-equipped bed, entered the University of Washington today. She has been paralyzed from the neck down since early childhood. Here Dr. Henry Schmitz, former university president and her sponsor, chats with Diane before registration while her Mrs. Clyde Ewing, looks on. Diane takes notes by holding a pencil in her teeth. neva early next "British have not year. leaving it, with at the! asked Beckstrom signed the their proposal be put on W. C. Johnson, assembly agenda. They The sheriff said comparison understood to feel it should ;of handwriting in that note be part of .the general dis- with Bcckstrom's auto license armament report rather than'application here was a major a separate topic. 'factor in his arrest. NEWSPAPER! Wisconsin Gradually clearing early tonight be- coming partly cloudy Fri- day. Continued cool. Outlook for Saturday: Partly cloudy and a little warmer except turning a little cooler north- west portion in the after- noon. Applcton Temperatures' for thc 24-hour period ending 9 a.m. today: High 57, low 48. Temperature at 10 a.m. today 58, with the discom- fort index at 59. Barometer reading 30.20 inches, with wind al eight miles from the northeast. Sun sets at p.m., ris- es Friday at a.m., and will be totally eclipsed in part of eastern Massachu- setts and partially eclipsed in the U. S. and Canada east of a line running from Apalachee Bay, Fla., through South Bend, Ind., to Churchill, on Hudson Bay. SEWSPAPERl   

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