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Appleton Post Crescent Newspaper Archive: September 30, 1959 - Page 1

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Publication: Appleton Post Crescent

Location: Appleton, Wisconsin

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   Appleton Post-Crescent (Newspaper) - September 30, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                               t t I 1 VOL U No. 82 52 AMCCIAKD wmemtvicK Price Seven Centt Prime Mjnisfer Of Italy Has talk With Ike Major Objective To Get Report on Khrushchev Parley Washington Prime Minister Antonio Segni of Italy arrived today and conferred with President Eisenhower on i n ternational problems. One of his m a i n purposes was to get a first hand report from the pres- ident on Soviet Premier Niki- ta K h r u s h- Segni chev's U. S. visit. The Italian visitor was met at the airport by Vice Presi- dent Richard M. Nixon and Sec. of State Christian ter. They escorted him to the White House. Nixon merely ushered Seg- ni into Eisenhower's green- tinted oval office and then left. But Herter and Italian For- eign Minister Giuseppe Pella sat in on the Elsenhower-Seg- ni talk. At the' a 19-gun sa- lute boomed out as Segni and stepped off the plane. President Asks Agreement to t End Steel Strike by Next Week 34 Die as Airliner Crashes Plane Flying From Houston To New York Falls on Cause of Tragedy Not Learned BY GARTH JONES Houston-to-New York airliner exploded in the air last streaked across the sky like-a comet and crashed. Thirty-four persons died as it struck on a. central Texas farm. The ship was a 75-passenger Braniff Airways tur- boprop Electra.. It carried 28 passengers and a crew of 6. It had scheduled stops at Dallas and Washington. There was no immediate explanation for the crash. Jack Miller of Braniff at Houston said the plane ar-j By JAMES M. LONG Russia Lowers Her Sights on Farm Program No Longer Aims to Surpass U. S. in Next 7 Years Backs De Gaulle Plan Envoy Calls It Only Way to End Conflict BY MAX HARRELSON United N. French Foreign Minister Maurice Couve de Murville declared today President De Gaulle's Algerian peace plan is the only way to'end the 5- year-old North African conflict. In a policy statement before the 82-nation general assem- Couve de Murville challenged the right of the U. N. to intervene in the French-Algerian dispute. The he exceeded the limits of its competency when it vot- ed to consider the problem. The French diplomat charg- ed further U. N. debate in the past has aggravated the Algerian conflict rather than contributing to a solution. He made no reference to France's reported decision to take no part in U. N. debate on Al- geria when the issue comes up later this fall. Urges Cease-Fire Couve de Murville appealed for a cease-fire in Algeria as a preliminary to a referendum which would decide the future of the strife-torn territory. is up to the Algerians themselves to choose their own he said. The French minister al- ready has served notice his delegation will boycott any de- bate on Algeria in both the litical committee assem- bly. He was certain to reiter- ate France's stand that Al- geria is an internal matter and no concern of the U.N. The French delegation sented itself briefly from the assembly last week when Sau-i di Arabian Chief Delegate Ahmad Shukairy labeled De Gaulle's Algerian plan j and Wounded in Fast Draw New London' Charles 1215 Shiocton accidentally shot himself in the right leg about a.m. Tuesday while practicing 'fast with a .22 caliber target pistol. Grimmer was .the pistol from its holster when the gun fired. The bul- let struck a coin in 'his pocket and pierced the skin on his right thigh and went under the skin about 10 inches. After the he drove his car to the hospi- tal where he was treated and released. The accident was reported to the city police. last Surviving Son Of Accident Victim Also Fatally Injured Fond 4i Goe- bel. 19-year-old sole surviving son of prominent farm opera- tor Henry Gocbcl. who was killed earlier this month in enjoying beautiful early 'o'lhcr farm was in-' fall weather this res- ljurcd fatally Tuesday when idcnts of the mountain jhc was pulled into a corn chop- states and thc cast coast jpcr on one of thc family are being battered by vio- lent in the east. Shipping Strike May Hurricane Gracic has caus- rr 9 ed extensive damage along Begin at Midnight the Atlantic coast and rain j still is falling in many East and In thc wcsU thc first coast shipping firms and rived in Houston 22 UPi Soviet Russia utes late and thus was sharply lowered its sights target increases in agri- minutes late in leaving for the next seven terminal. It became Abandoned is 'its prom- to surpass the United jorne seven minutes in per capita produc- at p.m. Miller had of milk and butter. explanation of why the craft arrived abruptly lowered aims in agricultural increases were reported today in the food and No Hint of g r i c u 1 ture organization's Bruce Chambers of the annual world survey. eral aviation with the lowered FAO experts said the office in Forth Union may have con- the ship was flying on an difficulty meeting strument plan at new 7-year schedule for in- t made its last report about p. m. when east of Chambers he described the report as a routine filing on the plane's speed and altitude. -The pilot gave no indication of trouble at the time food production. Sharp Increase Despite the FAO report showed Soviet Russia's increase agricultural output the past year was more than double the world average. Average increase in world food output last year was 4 cent. Russia's increase Broken clouds hovered 9 per cent. this area then. There United States showed a hunderstorm activity of about 6 per but 75 miles to the northwest United States is trying to none in the immediate farm surpluses. Turn to Page Col. is why FAO experts think Soviet Russia may have meeting even the reduced agriculture Drunken schedule of the new 7-year Since Jan. new plan went into effect this based on gains Tlnf IQSjfl over isoo. JDUI 259. William J. a year of bumper crops in The grain harvest was on Page highest in Russia's history. M __ AT Htrrphoto President Eisenhower Meets with David president of the striking steelworkers and his aides as the White House today entered the dispute now in its 12th week. With Eisenhower and McDonald are I. W. union and Howard second from vice president. Weatherman Kind Here but Norm Wesf While midwcstcrners arc 3 Youths Rob Hitchhiking Student Three unidentified youths slugged and robbed a hitch- hiking student of Wisconsin State college. Oshkosh about p.m. Tuesday near the intersection of Highways 45 and 76 at Greenville. County Patrolman Cal Spice found Richard John- son. 19. of 920 Carney boule- vard. Marincttc. lying un- conscious near thc roadway after passcrsby had stopped at the Silver Dome. Green- and notified authori- ties. Jobnson said he rode with a fncnd to Highways 45 and Khrushchev Tells China of Need for Ending Cold War Wants to 'Create Conditions For International Friendship' Tokyo Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev lectured Mao Tze-tung publicly today on the need lor ending the cold war and then met with the red Chinese leader in a closed session. The talks were described as cordial and friendly. The Soviet premier bounced .into Peiping from his historic conferences with President Eisenhower with a declaration that must be done to clear the atmosphere and create conditions for international Ike's Big Plane Walts to Fly Him To California His ment plancside appeared pronounce- 1 an obvious any Asian warning against rocking of the boat. The two giants of world com- munism were closeted with their top-ranking Chinese and Soviet lieutenants. Friendly Meeting They included Chinese Pres- ident Liu Vice Prcs- Rising Rate of Accidents Halted Washington Meets With Leaders of Both Sides Washington President Eisenhower to- day set an apparent dead- line of Oct. 8 for progress toward settlement in the steel strike. The antag- onists promptly arranged to resume talks this afternoon. The agreement to get i back to the bargaining table came within minutes after the close of separate iions w ith industry and union leaders in vvhich Eisenhower j figuratively knocked heads to- jgcther. 4 The president met first with llcading blccl company execu- headed by Roger M. U. S. Steel corpora- tion then with un- iion leaders headed by David .1. president of the United Steelworkers. lie called on them to re- new negotiations looking to- ward a voluntary settlement of -the 78-day-oId strike that would be fair and just to ev- eryone including the public. No Action Discussed sincerely the pres- ident an agree- ment can be initiated before my return to Washington next He is due back Oct. 8 from a trip to Palm Springs. to seek relief from a lingering cold. James C. the pres- ident's press was asked whether this pinned an Oct. 8 deadline on invoking the Taft-Harllcy law to stop the strike for 80 days by court in- junction. IlaRcrty said no government action whatsoever was dis- P r.c s i- cussed by the president. dent Eisenhower's big jet air- The press secretary was liner is standing by to whether Eisenhower to southern California today' hoped for progress in neROtia- for a week of prescribed tions by Ocl. 8 or a completed for his cold. The president faced a busy schedule in and advance of de- agreement by then. Hagcrty replied that thinks Eisenhower's hope that he also has agreement can be initi- Chicago T h e trend in the nation's death toll has been at least. take into account the whims of Hurricane Gracic. Unless the hurricane fouls rising UP lnc weather too the Turn to Page Col. 3 Radio Operator Steamship j Palm Springs. about 2 Hl air forcc jct a Boeing 707. would get him TOr IWUfOer Thc National Safety Council1 to the west coast in the late A municipal 7-month'afternoon. California time. court warrant today accused From the airport in Palm the radio operator of the Dutch This ident Chu Premier Chou today En-lai and some other cndcd ims Springs Eisenhower plans to steamship Utrecht of murder cd officials. Khrushchev was thc first month of 1959 that lravcl by helicopter about 20 the death of Miss Lynn accompanied by his snow an miles to La Qumla. Calif. minister. Andrei ovcr thc corresponding and Mikhail Suslov. onaof thc most important men In thc Soviet communist party. Radio Pciping told ol held presumably toj month of 1958. The August fatality Kriuffmnn whose battered Mrs. Eisenhower is not no-' body washed ashore in a Bos- ing along with the ton harbor jsland 10 days ago. She has a White House tea Named the killer of the i scheduled tomorrow petite. 23-year-old Chicago di- RlSioTeTnlnff thc same Jn members of the General Fed- vcrccc was Willcm Mane Lou- he d nreSmab v toi M last year. I cration of Women's Clubs. Van of Rcvy street. give Mao a quick fill in on Khrushchevi's talks with Eis- enhower. It described the meeting as held a friendly Together Mao and Khrush- chev rule 850 million human 10 and then got a ride from the three youths in a 1949 or 1950 model car. The youths drove to thc 45 and 76 turn- ed cast on 76 and stopped. When Johnson got out of thc beings car he said thc youths eot At a'reception given by big-wigs to thc Russians. Pciping for red China's anniversary celcbra-' tions tomorrow. Chou hailed and slugged him. Miss- ing was from Johnson's wallet. Johnson described thc youths as 19 or of medi- um 5 feel. 9 inches tall and with brown hair. Two of the youths wore short gray jackets and thc third had on a short dark jacket. Johnson said. Thomson Candidacy For Congress Backed Former Governor Silent on Plans to Seek Seat Held by Gardner Withrow Hoofdstroot. Holland. The warrant was issued by Chief Justice Elijah Ad low on request of Lt. John Donovan I of the homicide squad. Donovan acted on order of Deputy Supt. Francis M. Tier- nan who received word from Capi. Joseph B. homi- cide chief who is in New York questioning Van Kie and other crew members. Thc deputy said Fallen told him the man admitted a love with the young woman Khrushchev missionary of to the United States. M.OH-I. 'seal in the house of rcprcscn- I Communist C h.i na wholly Madivm The prospective gaining momentum dunng a 41-day passage from approves thc candidacy of former Gov. i.--- Thomson for a congressional district nique issued by Khrushchev Turn to Page 10. Col. 6 third lo areas Wg storm of the season dumped .as much as ten inches of snow in some areas. Yes. weather dominates news today. You'll find stories on the weather on Page 1. Page 2. and a m-cathcr summary and map on Page D-4 of tonight's TODAY'S INDEX Ctomics Farm TefeviftiMi V Weather Map Twin Cities cc Alt A S Alt C7 C It C 5 C A D B longshoremen recessed anoth- er negotiating session far from reaching a settlement to avert a crip-1 pling strike at midnight to- night. state and city me- diators agreed there was indication of a settlement be-' fore expiration of the I contract. The International' a s s o ciation jsays no no work. j A strike could tic up and idle more than 000 longshoremen from Maine' to Texas. it wouM Onvw many other workers off their jobs. Tt would hamper the opera- tions of passenger would not cut them off. It would also cut off the trickle of steel coming to east ports from Jin the midst of a lengthening j nationwide steel strike. the Far East quar- Fallen told him i was a discussion of The governor is a lone-time before the shin I resident of Richland Center. -v.ailcd from Boston the night of the center of the south- u Ticrnan told newsmen the western Wisconsin district mArii undcr questioning ia that has a Ions Republican admitted being m voting and has retain- the young woman's cabin. ed his legal residence there I. Talk About Familiar this one bring back a memory or two of last winter in the Fox Cities. And now it's that time again. AT This trail of broken trees in was left by a heavy September snow measuring more than four inches. fcaicd as governor last fall. Thomson made no lic comment .on thc possibili- Uy of a congressional bid Jo succeed Rep. Gardner With- i row of who cv pccts to at thc end of 'his present term Some But the matter had some discussion among a group of county chairmen of the who have asked Thomson to make' a decision reasonably soon because of their desire to field another candidate early in ilic year if Thomson de- clines. Meanwhile thc candidate picture in the dis-' trict has emerged clearly.' District Democrats now as- agam. Weof herman Soys Rain Wisconsin Mostly cloudy and cool entire state tonight and Thursday. Chance of light rain over southwest and e x t r e rn north tonighl and Thurs- day Outlook for followed by partial clearing and colder. Appleton for the period ertd- ing a.m High low 4-1. 10 a m. today. with discom- fort index at 57. Barometer reading 30.12 with wind nine miles from west. Mold count 209 per square pollen 12 per square yard. Snn sets at ris- es Thursday at rises Thursday at a.m. NEW SF4PERS   

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