Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Appleton Post Crescent Newspaper Archive: September 26, 1959 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Appleton Post Crescent

Location: Appleton, Wisconsin

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Appleton Post-Crescent (Newspaper) - September 26, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                               APPLETON POST CRESCENT VOL U No. 79 28 B SBTEMttR ASSOCIATED MUMS W1RB SERVICE Price Seven Cents Tibet Issue in UN May Bring New Tension Malaya Want Full-Scale Assembly Debate BY TOM HOGE United N. A drive for a full-scale debate on Tibet stirred concern in the United Nations today that cast-west tensions will be tightened up again. Diplomats also feared the movg will dredge up the whole question of red China's representation in the U. N. again. The assembly voted only a few days ago to shelve the red China issue for anoth- er year. Would Invite China Ireland and Malaya disclos- ed yesterday that they plan to call for a resolution charg- ing red China with killing freedom in Tibet and demand- ing for fundamental human for the Tibet- ans.' One delegate predicted that as soon as the request to put the Tibetan issue on the agen- da hits the 21-nation steering committee demands will arise that red China be invited here to give her side of the case. Coal Miners t Stage Protest In Germany 'West Germany Thousands of silent and waving 'black flags marched through Bonn today demanding gov- ernment action to cope with a mounting coal crisis. With the rich Ruhr giving up millions of tons of coal more than can be many pits face a shutdown and miners are losing their jobs. Union leaders said miners were taking part in the the big- gest in. the 10-year history of this West German capi- tal. No Strike Pledge Precautions were taken both by the union and police to prevent communist agita- tors from stirring up trouble. The union named marshals to keep out- siders from butting in. No. speeches were on the pro- gram. Union Chairman Heinrich Gutermuth said hopes of the communists for a strike will not be fulfilled. There will be no Many of the placards car- ried by the marchers de- manded nationalization of the mines. The mine work- ers are complaining the government is not doing enough to dispose of the 17 million tons of unsold coal piled up at pitheads. Stevenson Talks Little of Running Democrat Steps Nimbly Through Queries at Press Conference BY JOHN WYNGAARD Foit-Croecnl SUff Writer Madison Adlai Stevenson of Illinois late Friday quip- ped his w'ay nimbly through press conference queries about his'prospects for a third Democratic nomination for the but didn't quite close the door to the possibility.- The man who made popular among Demo- crats faced the most crowd- ed state capitol press confer- ence in years. Flanked by Gov. Gaylord he re- peated what he said and time he is not a candidate. But he' didn't say he would- n't accept a and declined briefly and firmly to assess the' prospects of others already in the running. Round Table Talk Stevenson was here to speak at the round table about an ancestor who was an Illinois politician and a confi- dant of and also to greet the Dane county Demo- cratic club. With the velvety voice and rich phrase of his campaign orations of 1952 and 1956. Ste- venson greeted reporters ob- viously inspired by reports that Gov. titular lead- er of the Wisconsin Democrat- ic party. Is preparing to take the leadership of a Stevenson draft movement. Stevenson appeared anxious to detour conversation from his political future. At one point he volunteered his inter- pretations of Khrushchev's motives in his American but the questioning got back to the nomination again. Stevenson was- asked if he would mind making an ap- praisal dates ior the party nomina- tion. r f do he responded instantly. Later he said the nominee must have intelli- gence and courage. The party Turn to Page Col. 7 No Survivors in Aleutian Crash Alaska A ground party which clawed its way up an unnamed peak in the wild Aleutian islands yesterday reported that all 16 persons aboard had been kill- ed when an airliner smashed into the mountain Thursday night. k Ike and Khrushchev Discuss i Critical Issues of Cold War AP Assemblyman Jerry Blaska worked his way through the line Friday night at a Madison reception for Adlai Democratic pres- idential candidate in 1952 and 1956. Gov. Gaylord Nelson is on Stevenson's right. James a prominent Madison is on his left. Bullet Fired by Assassin Kills Bandaranaike Dahanayake Sworn In as Successor To Prime Minister BY DENZIL PEIRIS Ceylon Prime Minister Solomon Ban- daranaike died today from an assassin's bullets apparent victim of the struggle between eastern and western ways which swept him into power 3i years ago. The frail-looking 60-year-old champion of Asian neutralism succumbed almost on the eve of a visit to the United which only a few months ago he termed Asia's best friend. Wijayananda a 57-year-old politician from Bandaranaikc's was sworn in as the new prime minister. Dahanayake in the past has ranged the political spectrum from revolutionary red to conservative blue. Forced Red to Quit His most recent exploit was to force the resignation ol Marxist ministers of food and industries from the cabinet. British educated Bandara- failcd to survive a 5- to remove The steel negotiator in McDonald Says New York Talks Are Concluded New York industry's top the 74-day-old steel strike says he's ready to resume talks here Monday. But Steelwork- ers President Mc- Donald says he's through talk- ing in New York. Chief Federal Mediator ans to Washington with Sec. of La- bor James P. Mitchell to re- view the stalemate. Finnegan indicated the talks might be shifted from New York when they but he didn't say where. McDonald broke off the ne- West Berlin and Reunify Of Germany Still Among Most Important Problems Gettysburg. Pa. President Eisenhower and Soviet Prime Minister Nikita S. Khrushchev today began a problem-by-problem debate of critical cold war is- sues. The second round of their historic discussion began in Eisenhower's hideaway on a mountaintop surround- ed hanging clouds. Meeting in Eisenhower's lodge at Camp David in Maryland's Catoctin t h a two leaders could see only a few yards through the pic- ture window of their fcrcnce room. The critical east-west dis- pute over the of West Berlin as well as the broader of divided Germany a high priority on the agenda of the day's session. Eisenhower and Khrush- who began their talks 'early last night after a heli- N. niRht from 'Rocky' Sounds Out Opinion New Hampshire Visit Suggests Primary Contest York Gov. Nelson A. Rocke- ten met for the first time this feller arrived in this political-1 morning at the breakfast table and immediately began ly strategic stale today for whirlwind visit that off fresh speculation he would run for the Republican nomin- ation for president. Report Promised This start on the day's workf the world watching for jthe results to be announced There was widespread be- reported to lief he was here to sound al lhe Gettysburg naike hour Plane Down at i fi A M i 10 Airmen Rescued I f Unfavorable Weather Does Not Stop Operations in Pacific was from Seattle Ten wet and the cutter. werei weary navy airmen plucked unharmed from The which had tossing Pacific ocean early to-ichanged course toward spleen and arm. Gov. Gen. Sir Oliver Goonc- one of Britain's last remaining links with proclaimed a state of emer- gency on the island until the uncertain political situation is clarified. On his the mild- mannered prime minister for gave his accused assassin a opinion on his chances next March in the New Hamp- shire which nation If li clash with Vice press center by Mrs. Anne Wheaton of the While House press office. session around Mid-day. Richard Nixon now the lead- Thc Khrushchcv-Eisonhow ing contender for the party broakfast lalk rcportediy nomination to succeed Presi- an hour or less in dent Eisenhower. Denies Trip Political living room of Aspen lodge. Eisenhower and Khrush- professcd Buddhist medical He has insisted he plan- Rockefeller has laughed WJH come to grips at suggestions his trip was poli- who whipped out a re- volver and fired as Bandara- naike bowed in reverence to him. The monk and another man clad in saffron monks' robes had called at the prime min- ister's bungalow in a luxurious' Colombo residential area yes- nearly 12 hours afterjfliers while en route up thejtcrday morning. they had ditched their to was The gunman reportedly was ncd it only to visit with his class- football Dartmouth college mates and watch a game here. But his schedule also in- their conference with cold war problems that have kept Turn to Paste Col. 4 Japs Get Set for Another Typhoon A news conference at ss the' Tokyo Japan batten- newly opened down lodav for lhe bigEest of of the year as Typhoon Concord street from headquarters engined patrol plane. for ito proceed after a by the prime minis- Rockefeller 4. aucr a refusal to go all the way movement. A massive rescue operation'done from the coast guard. in sncddjng wcstcrn ways A meeting with Hamp went like Rescue operations of ancjcnl eastern mcd-'shire Gov. Wesley horc down on the indus- trial area of south central w w f w foul as SOOP thc ical techniques known as'regarded as a Nixon support- remained intact after the engined craft exploded into flames on impact at the 2.- 000-foot level of the moun- on Great Sitkin a volcanic island 24 miles north- east of Adak. Probe Cost of Drugs For Arthritis Victims Washington A senate subcommittee plans hearings Nov. 90 on complaints by old- er people that drugs for arth- jcal He said he would resume only when man- agement offers something 'worthy of consideration by self-respecting steel Strong Earthquake Off Oregon's Coast Berkeley. Calif. A strong earthquake somewhere off the Oregon coast register- ed on the University of Calif- ornia seismograph a. m. today. j .t. Koftl Patrol Plane radioed an v v da and the fliers onp Or Uvo ayurveaa. e rf .u r .u r- al e ot s l c The assassin was j-hot by a A miles off the mouth of the Co- gincs was afire. The a'scntry while trying to flee and Honshu. Fringes of the amclcr storm 500-mile di- lumbia rwcr. In Good Condition The ten. crammed into naval air pair of well-outfitted were pulled to safe- The plane steadily lost alti-'cinc. He was being guarded in was on a routine was He coastal patrol from at the hospital as Tal-j naval air sta- duwa Sovarama. a spcc-i ialist in eastern style mcdi-l ty aboard the coast guard cut- tude as its Lt. James B. ter Yocona from Ore. Hcnson. 27. of Ark.. The freighter Olympic desperately to make it ncer had reached the scenejto land. Henson finally sent only moments before the hospital ward by o policc- already sweeping the Pacific coast dinner meeting with of JaPan with winds prominent residents of New heavy rains. Hampshire who launched Inc draft Rockefeller movement.forces and want him to enter the1 winds in lbc Tokvo arca wcrfl commander of U.S. in Japan announced state's primary. I expected to About 200 persons were hand to greet exceed 50 miles gusts up to 65 Police and'word he had to radioed kera Thcro of who Rockefellerimph within the next 12 when his plane landed u-s- civilian and military after midnight at Grcnicripersonnel were advised to stores of stood by as the mcn position and the craft was accused of being with the Buddhst monk G Pannasc- Air Force basc at Manchcs- draw Univcrsilv of Ncw food and flashlight batteries. hauled from the sea at pcd down. a.m. JKunman. Police Hampshire students display- It remained afloat long'several other monks through-led placards inscribed ritis cost too much. Little Known Martyr's Story Related Today Most Americans who prize freedom of speech and freedom-of the press be hard put to iden- tify Matthew Lyon. Yet he was the chief martyr of tiie Sedition Law of 1798. Under it he was sentenced to four imprisonment for publish- ing a letter criticizing President and he j might have served more time but for fast talk and fast horse. The story of this first and only effort of the United i States government to legis- late against freedom of ex- pression is told on Page B-12 of tonight's Post-Crca- another in the of American scr- ies. Seismologist Dr. Don through a heavy cr said the earthquake was j cast onto the drama enfold- The hearings will open a'quilc slrong. He could not es-Sins general investigation by a sen-timatc now far off the The cutter radioed coast ate judiciary anti-trust sub-itnc temblor hit. j guard headquarters here committee into the cost of pre- Tocher discounted t h cjthe three officers scription drugs. After the Of a tidal wave aris-iscven enlisted mcn. were in sion on drugs for He also said that if condition but suffering subcommittee plans hearings quake had struck any where j from exposure and exhaus- on the price of hor-jnear land it was strongjtion. N'one was injured in the mones. diabetic drugs and'enough to have caused dam-jditching or during the tricky tranquilizers. jage in the immediate 'transfer from the lifcrafts to Hovering above were four cn0ugh for the mcn to clam- out the night in an effort loj roll with and here at'navy and coast guard aboard the rafts. idetermine the motive. 'Nelson will hold the ithcir powerful 5 2 Young Thugs Rob Couple Found Slain Underworld Figure and Beauty Queen Shot to Death in Auto TODAY'S INDEX FAI.KNKR i New York Under- 'world kingpin Anthony 'Augie Carfano. 62. snA a married beauty queen were shot to death last night in a black Cadillac in a quiet- ly substantial Queens neigh- borhood. Carfano. the pudgy prohi- .bition era henchman of Al Ca- ponc and longtime buddy of Frank CostcHo. and Jan- ice Drake. 32. who was mar- ried to comedian Allan were shot from the rear of Jhe gangster's swanky ear. In 1943. as Janice Hamcn. she won a Palisades Park beauty content. She was Miss New Jersey of 1M4. Saw 2 Men Flee Teacher in School New York Mrs Bet- ty Koffer was conducting her fourth grade class yesterday when two older boys walked in. is it you asked shcm. One youth don't dis you. and pulled out a knife. As Mrs. Koffcr and her J28 pupils the other bov bandit grabbed her purse revolvers. Carfano's trousers conjajnjnjr 539 and both pockets bulged with SI.500 in Koffcr dcscnbed tht and bills and in smaller bills. He was identi- fied from his auto licence. Quizzed in Sl.iyinc Mrs. who lived at 63-60 102nd street. young robbers as about 16 years old. She said she was sure they were not pupils at the school. P.S- 109 on K. Ninety-ninth through children from Oiarcli Nrtes Comics Deaths Editorials Heritage Strlex Kartmma A 7 A15 A A 4 AU B 4 Women's Seetiwi Weather May A 3 ofawcnMM. Anthony Carfano who in a The apparently tnov- of her neck and in the right palatial mansion in at the veered onto temple. on Long was a curb in the Jackson Heights Carfano. short and pol-bcl- familiar name in underworld wore a dark blue silk investigations for the last 35 Mrs. who was'years. i Neighbors Sold police they linked with another murder j During he wasj saw two men nee from ycars ago. wore a smartja kingpin in bootlegging Ar after they heard shots. No blue cocktail dress and a minkierations in Brooklyn and Thfc Is a ReprodactioM of the first cartoon of Premier Nikita Khrushchev to be thlftwo had been his operations were' published in the Soviet press. It appeared in Pravda with the head and once In his leftjearlicr at hotel near La Lntie Augic' we public works to get done. Uf. bury the halchet JTJ The Russian caption appears below the cartoon. was shot in the back were and .38 caliber Florida. 4- r r 1' from labels in her in___ 2952. she was questioned in connection with the slaying of playboy dress manufacturer ManY More Nat Nelson She was released May Gomes she told police she had cloudy with scattered showers or thundcrshowers tonight. Sunday partly cloudy. Con- tinued rather warm. Out- look for Partly continued warm. Applcton Temperatures for the 24-hour period cnd- inc 9 a.m. High 67. low 63 Temperature at 10 a.m. today with the dis- comfort index at 67. Baro- meter reading 29.72 inches with wind eight miles from the south. Precipitation an inch. Sun sets at rises Sunday at moon rises Sunday at a.m. Brightest star is Sin- Visible planet are Jupi- Saturn and Venus. _. dated Nelson the before his death Her who had been appearing at the Lotus club V'ashington with s-.nger Tony was notified of AJrs. death and was en to New- York. who 3n ed EWSPAPER   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication