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Appleton Post Crescent Newspaper Archive: September 14, 1959 - Page 1

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Publication: Appleton Post Crescent

Location: Appleton, Wisconsin

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   Appleton Post-Crescent (Newspaper) - September 14, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                               LI No. 68 38 B ASSOCIATED wine sntvics Price Seven Cents Civil Rights Issua Greatest Obstacle Adjournment BY JACK BELL Washington Congress edges its way toward possible adjournment today with friends and foes already ap- praising its legislative rec- s If southern opponents halt their attack on a rider ex- tending the life of the civil rights the senate maybe able to complete ac- tion' on a foreign aid bill it approved in sub- stance There was no terminal hour on the Dixie verbal onslaught the nor on the potential counter-threat that northerners might push for stronger civil rights leg- islation this year. The standing was ready for efforts to compro- mise bill with its own version of overseas assistance. Charges Rejected Money items for foreign aid and for miscellaneous unre- lated itemsialready have been tentatively decided by the sen- ate. Ifcii rejected Saturday night all efforts to change the appropriations recommended by its Two efforts by Sen. Allen J. Ellender to trim for- eign aid fundstwere defeated. A 55-37 roll call vote rejected a proposed million cut in military aid and a voice vote beat a million cut he proposed in economic help for nations maintaining large de- fense forces. Also by a stand- Ing was a proposal by Sen. 'Jacob K. to vote this- year a mil- lion fund for -development loans during the next fiscal-year. Russian Moon Shot Lauded on U S Visit w IOII 3r Fox Cities in Tragedy Strikes 3 Families on Way to Visit Dying Other Driver Also Killed A visit to a sick relative who later died ended tragically for three Fox Cities families early Sunday when three including a mother expecting her fourth were killed and two critically injured in a 2-car collision on Highway 57 near Saukville-which also claimed the life of an Oak man. Dead Mrs. Leonard of 136 S. Weimar street. William J. route Menasha. Henry H. route Menasha. William Oak 111. Critically Injured In critical condition at St. Alphonsus hospital in Port Washington Leonard Kather- ine's who has severe head fractures of both legs and severe injuries to the chest and right hand. Last rites of the Roman Cath- olic church were administered Sunday. Mrs. Kathryn Turn to Page Col. 4 S Ike Signs Bill to Measure Curbs Picketing And Boycott Activities Washington President Eisenhower today signed into 'law.the bill regulating internal affairs of Jabor unions.and limiting their boycott and picketing activities. The a landmark of the 1959 'session of Signs Billboard Measure Only Part of Control Nelson Asserts represents one of Eisenhower's most important legislative -triumphs. It contains Taft-Hartley law he in- sisted were essential to effective bilL The-new law is designed to curb-racketeering arid other abuses in some unions spot- lighted in congressional in- yestigations. y The law also puts new itrictipns on organizational picketing by unions and .'ton boycotts. A secondary boycott one directed at an employer with whom the union has no direct Major Changes The AFIXJIO contends these Taft-Hartley changes will labor's' legitimate economic powers. Employers argue that the boycott and picketing weapons were abus- ed by the teamsters and some other unions. The measure oposed by organ- ized labor in its final form. The act contains by a wide margin the most far-reaching rewriting oC the nation's la- Turn to Page Col. 1 Junkets May Be Curbed Would Not be Permitted During Congress Term Washington House leaders may ban junkets next year while congress is in ses- sion. Junkets are those taxpayer- paid trips aboard so dear to the heart of so many con- gressmen. Fewer than half of the house members were present for Saturday's session. Many of them have-been' abroad for some time. Others had gone EotrifTfor the That meant Saturday's ses- sion lacked a at- tendance of at least half the members. If one member had Off icials Discuss Visit By Khrushchev President Confers WithHerter .And Anderson Washington Eisenhower and other top government officials today discussed all aspects of the talks Eisenhower will start tomorrow with Soviet Pre mier Nikita S. Khrushchev. The president conferred for 75 minutes at the White with Sec. of State Christian A. Sec. of the Treasury Robert B. An derson and Llewellyn Thomp U. S. ambassador to the Soviet Union. Several other state depart ment officials also sat in. Meeting about 24 hours in 'the have had to house would adjourn until enough of the wanderers were called bapk. No one so some routine business was taken care of. Under consideration is a 'proposed rule.that would'bar use .of public funds for con- gressional t r a v e 1 .overseas congress is in session. member going abroad at that'-timV-would have to pay his w Absenteeism has been a vi- tal factor several times in re- cent weeks. Madiwm regulations Women's Part In Races Told In Photos Miss Carol Richardson. of the Post-Crescent socie- ty was in Elk- hart Lake over the week- end for the Road America races. There were no women but women nonc- the-less played' an impor- tant part. Her account of what women do at sports car races is told in story and pictures on Page A-17 of tonifht's TODAY'S INDEX Canfca Deaths Series H K Sptita BIZ AS At Ml All BS A 7 Map Twit Bll Billboard for Wisconsin's' department of agriculture Oshkosa. 452 miles of interstate highway became-part of the state sta- tutes today. signing the measure. Gaylord Nelson said it represented only part of his campaign for control of Nelson's second proposal to regulate billboards along the stale's 10.500 mile state trunk system was laid over until the fall session of the legislature. Of the two meas- the governor made it known he deemed the state road ban on signboards more important. The new law forbids bill- boards in an area 660 feet on either side of the center line of an interstate highway. Only signs allowed in UM area are official traffic in- on premise sale and signs di- recting travelers to off-high- way recreation- al or automotive services. Also established are annual fees for permissible signs within the zoned area. They include a charge for signs less than 50 square for signs between SO and 300 square and an addition- al Jl.charge for each succeed- ing 200 square feet. Billboard owners are given one year to remove forming signs. Other signed intc law by the governor included an assembly bill allowing the state to act automatically on safety standards for food ad- ditives and insecticides set toy the federal food and drug ad- ministration. i Uadtr tfca MW tin state longer will be required to is- sue separate regulations on pesticides and but can simply ban use of those declared unsafe by federal government. advance scheduled of Khrushchev' arrival in Wash the group thoroughly explored strategy for .the E senhower talks with th Kremlin leader. Eisenhower- Taii'd Khru shchev are scheduled to mee at the White House tomorrow afternoon their first dis for which 90 minutes has been set aside. That will be shortly afte the communist chieftain ar packing the. prestige of Russia's new Sscientffi the' weekend bullseye to moon. In response Senators to questions White House Press Sec James- C. Hagerty described meeting as a genera type of. president session and the the people in he government have prior to the visit of any foreign offi Hagerty added that the dis cussion all aspects of the not. on ly procedural but topics to be discussed-by our Drunken Drivers Since Jan. 1 239. Hubert 231. Merfe 24 roate 232. Venm E. Lisbon on Page AF Wlrephoto Russian Authorities Say Its rocket came down about a quarter of the way from the center of moon's disc to its outer edge at a point near the Sea of the Sea of Serenity and the Sea of Vapors. This composite picture shows the moon from first to last quarter. Advises Bluntnest Nixon Asks People To Question Nikita New York Vice Pres- ident Richard M. Nixon said that while being courteous and polite to Soviet Premier Nikita should speak out to him on major controversi- al issues. addressing the cen- tennial session of the Ameri- can Dental devot- ed his talk to Khrushchev's visit to the United which starts tomorrow. Not Emotional and politeness do not and should not mean any hesitancy on our part in keep- ing the record- straight where controversial issues are con- Nixon said. Ignoring controversial com- ment in order to avoid un- pleasantness. Nixon a grave mistake where like'Mr. Khrushchev are con- 'v Although the Soviet boss of- ten appears emotional and Nixon said found that in .private conver- sation when the chips were down he was a calculat- balloting in this tough-minded advocate of his point of Nixon. good may come out of Khrushchev's U. S. visit because the latter lieves what he sees far more than what he said 'does not need to be convinc- ed that the government and people of the U.S. want peace .the danger is that he may believe-we may want peace so much we will pay any price to get it. including sur- render at the conference ta- Truman Doesn't Want To Meet Khrushchev New York UH Former President Harry S. Truman said today he would not see Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khruschev 1 can help 38-square-mile republic rounded by Italian soil gave the Christian Democrats. 27 ol the 60 The democratic socialists took 9 seats giving the anti-reds clear The commu- nists won their left-wing socialist allies' The leftist alliance won 35 scats in-the last'election four years but lost control in 1957.' when six socialists in the legislature crossed over to the Christian democratic. camp. Th'e red bloc then tried to dissolve the legislature and call new elections. The Chris- tian Democrats declared the move illegal and formed a new government.- They took over after a 2-week bloodless civil war.. I This Is Ike Sperts Car involved in the col- abo died. He was alone in his apparently lision on Highway 57 near Saukville Sunday in which returning from the sports car races at Elkhart three Fox Cities people hi the other car were killed. Two other persons in the other car were crittcat WUlian Oak the sporto f Coalition Beats San Marino Reds San Chris tian Democrats and thei democratic socialist allie held control of San Marino' legislature beating the Red Leader Due Tuesday In Nation BY STANLEY JOHNSON Moscow Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev is lying to Washington to- morrow amid worldwide acclaim for the Soviet feat of landing a rocket on the moon. Congratulations stream- in today from the six con- inents for this development in the conquest of space. American scientists were mong the first to hail the andling of the 860-pound lu- nar probe as a remarkable ob of scientific reckoning and marksmanship. U. S. Congratulations The official reaction of the J.S. national aeronautics and pace administration summed up in Washington by ts deputy Dr. Hugh have followed with in- erest the travel of the Soviet unar probe to its impact with the moon. 'We wish to congratulate our fellow scientists and engineers on their success n this forward step in the exploration of space. hope that the scientific data obtained in this flight will soon be available for study by the scientists of all Typical of the reaction among the. Soviet Union's communist neighbors was a declaration in Prague of the Czechoslovak newspaper shake the hand of our our So- viet sharing their joy with Saw Dust Cloud The Soviet news' agency Tass picked up a British story quoting Heinz di- rector of -.the Bochum communists in an the first time since 'World war II. Final results in tory iri'the as Russia feat could be compared to rifleman hitting the eye of a fly at a of silt miles. Radio Budapest said garian scientists spotted a dust cloud raised on the moon when the rocket landed at CoL'3-. Boy Drowns in Pond On Hit Father's Farm 11-year-old sent out on. horseback-to get the drowned Sunday a pond on his fathe'r's farm town-of Dallas. The victim was Gerald'F. Jrueggeman. son1 of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Brueggeman. When Gerald's which ic rode with a saddle or bri- was found wet and mud- a search was started for he boy. Deputies found his body in 10 feet of water. West Satisfied Red Rocket Struck Moon Washington Evidenceilong-range radar and con- obtained by western world in-jccivably could have knowl- ing center of the air force bal- listic missile division's spacs Turn to Page 10. .CoL 5 announcement that the win to announcc. moon rocket actually hit the The NASA official moon. American space offi- evidence on the flight of the cials said today. j apparently successful rocket said analyzed by the comput- spokcsman for the National Aeronautics and Space ad- ministration. NASA at the same time said it had no information on any Soviet moon rocket preceding the successful at- tempt. Eye Missile Tests Vice President Richard M. Nixon in New York had told newsmen there were such failures. He also com- mented thai there was no of-t ficial proof that the rocket hit the moon as Mos-j cow announced. i Even before today's report on western instrument read-j U.S. scientists had as-j nimcd success for the Soviet trial and sent With respect to the of'previous Soviet tries for a' moon a -NASA -spokes- man said such if it were would be classified secret by the mili- we are a non-class- ified The United States is. known to be watching Soviet ballistic launchinc tests with Will Continue Wisconsin Fair cool and dry weather will con- t i n u e over Wisconsin through Tuesday although it will be a little cooler ov- er the north half of the state. Low temperatures to- night in 40s or low 50s. Out- look for Fair' and somewhat cooler. Temperatures for the 24-hour period end- ing at 9 a.m. High 74. low 52. Temperature at 10 aon. 66 with the discom- fort index at 61. The baro- meter reading is with wind nine miles from .the south. Sun sets at ris- es Tuesday at moon sets Tuesday at a.m. Prominent star is An- tares. Visible planets aft Jupiter. Satura iNEWSPAPERr   

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