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Appleton Post Crescent: Saturday, September 5, 1959 - Page 1

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   Appleton Post-Crescent (Newspaper) - September 5, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                               APPLETON POST CRESCENT VOL. U No. 62 24 Pages-Sections A.B ASSOCIATED F1UCM Price Seven Cents 5 Children Found Dead in Mother Dies Later Gas Poisoning Believed Cause of Tragedy in North Oconto County Five ranging in age from one to 10 were found dead and their mother in critical condition Friday night in their 1-room cottage in this north- eastern Wisconsin community. They apparently died from gas poisoning. The mother died at a. m. today at a La- ona hospital. The dead are Mrs. Gloria and her children and Caro- 1. The bodies were found about 11 p. m. Friday night when Mrs. Kenneth Posselt of Town- and a Sandy called at the Kovge cottage on McClauslin seven miles northwest of here in Oconto county. Mrs. Pos- a family was to drive Mrs. Rovge to Townsend to join her who was driving up from Mil- waukee to spend the weekend with his family. Doors Locked Mrs. Posselt ties that when told authori- they arrived at the cottage the lights were out and the doors were lock- ed. She said she shined a flashlight through the window and saw the bodies on the floor. Mrs. Posseit returned to Townsend to inform authori- ties and told her husband. Rovge had arriv- ed from Milwaukee. Rovge and Posselt returned to the broke down the door and took the bodies outside. Coroner Clarence McMahon said the children apparently died sometime Thursday night because they had been dead at least 24 hours when found. Gas Poisoning McMahon said there were indications they died of gas poisoning but he could not say what kind. The cottage used bottled gas for heat and light and had a combination coal and gas range for cook- ing. The bottled gas contain- ers were empty. All the win- dows of the 1-room cottage were closed. Authorities said the mother and one child were found in a the in her and the others on the floor. The a steamfitter and was working in Milwaukee during the week while family vacationed at the cottage. The bodies were taken to Boyle's Funeral home at Wa- beno. Ike Returns to Golf Course as Rest Continues Scotland President Eisenhower today began another round of golf topping his first drive into the rough. he as he smilingly shook his head. The president followed two other players .who -did the same thing. Standing on the first tee of the Turnberry course where he played Eisen- hower joked with his partners and a group of about 20 spec- tators and policemen. The president is relaxing in Scotland until Monday after his May mission of consulta- tions with West European leaders on the eve of Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrush- chev's visit to the United States. The sun was shining bright- ly as the foursome went to the tee. Congress Facts Real Sptcial Session Threat Washington Con- UTCSS. already buffeted by presidential faced the added threat today of to a special fall session meet President Eisenhower's demand for authority to con- trol interest rates on govern- tnent bonds. The special session possibil-j ity assumed solid proportions j as result of yesterday's house i action denying Eienhower'si urgent request for repeal of J the 41 per cent legal limit Iong4erm bond interest rates Fined tor Being With White Girl Ga. An air force master sergeant of alleged Negro blood has paid a fine for being in com- pany with a woman. Sgt. George about of nearby Hunter Air Force appeared white but police testified yesterday that his drivers license listed him as a Negro. Police said he drank at bar and later attended white drive-m theater w i th Miss Norma K. Rikeman. She was freed of a disorderly con- duct charge but was held for three days for a board ofj health examination. i Patrolman R. P. Barnes of county police testified that when Miss Rikeman was told Agard was a she cov- ered her face with her hands and my Julius attorney for Miss contended Atty. Gen. Eugene Cook of Georgia ruled recently that it not contrary to state law for a white persoa to be as.- sociated with a Negro m a public place. E.C.Hilfertr Mill Dead at 72 i Served Riverside As Head Of Vocational Board Edward C. of 832 W. Front presi- dent of Riverside Paper cor- poration and prominent in education and civic affairs in Appleton for 40 died at p.m. Fri- day after a short illness. Funeral services will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday at the Wich- mann Funeral with the Rev. Adam Grill in charge. Burial will be in St. Mary cemetery. Friends may call at the fu- neral home after 3 p. m. Sun- day. An Ed Hilfert Memorial fund is being established for Appleton Memorial and St Elizabeth hospitals. Vocational Board who would have been 73 Sept. was born in Appleton and schoo' here. His the former Kathryn whom he married in died in 1948. There were no children Tna current president of the Appleton Vocational school board of he be came a board member in late succeeding the late John Watson. He was elected pres- Turn to Page Col. 3 Roads Crowded for Last Summer Holiday The -Post-Crescent will not publish La- bor day. E. C. Hilfert 'Only One I've Got' Saves Life Of Her Infant Sister St Minn. Joyce is the only baby sister I've I sim- ply had to do Linda Kay had only this simple explanation for the mouth-to mouth respiration that police and the family doctor credited with breathing life back into the tiny body of her 2-year old sister. High Fever ill with a high fev- suddenly went and stopped breathing after a convulsion in the family's suburban Maplewood home. away mother was on the telephone try- ing to get the doctor and the I just had to do Lin- da Kay said matter-of-fact- ly yesterday. What she did was to start forcing her own breath into the baby's mouth. She kept on for about 5 or 10 min- utes. in a while Joyce would sort of gasp a little and stop breathing I was half crying but I kept at said Linda Kay. When police and the doc- tor did arrive. Joyce was breathing regularly again. said-I did Linda Kay happily report- ed. remembered reading m the newspaper how one kid saved another kid's life by breathing in his she continued. I thought it might work with Fair Weather Plus Long Weekend Lure Thousands To State for Labor Day Fox Cities residents joined thousands of other motorists amming Wisconsin highways today at the start of the final toliday period of the summer season. The weatherman cooperated bringing fair skies today and the promise of more sunshine with some scattered possibly by Monday. But casting a tragic pall over the otherwise gay activities was a steadily mounting highway death toll. A last summer's outing found the hies and trains travelers as the summer va- cation season drew to a close. AP Wlrephota Four Persons Were Killed in this automobile when it was crushed in an ac- cident also involving two trailer trucks Friday about six miles east of Pa. A trailer loaded with pounds of explosives was halted on Route 22 when it was struck from behind by this car. Another trailer truck following bit the rear of the automobile. UN Ready to Deal With Laos' Appeal for Aid Against Reds Security Council May be Called Into Emergency Session Monday i United N. but the anli-commu- Secretary General Dag Ham- marskjold hurried home from South America today to deal with Laos' appeal for a UN task force to stop any ag- nist organization regards the Asian kingdonv as under its protection. It was understood that there was no substantial dis- gression from communist North Viet Nam. Diplomats expected the 11- nation security council to be called into an emergency ses- sion Monday but predicted Soviet Union would veto any UN intervention into the fight- ing in the southeast Asian kingdom. Emergency Session In the event of a Soviet ve- to in the council any seven members of the council can call an emergency session of the 82-nation assembly with- in 24 hours. The feeling is that the as- sembly would approve help to the hard pressed Buddhist kingdom. diplomats rep- resenting the anti-communist Southeast Asia Treaty Organ- ization met in Washington last night. A statement issued afterward emphasized that Laos is within the region of direct interest of Laos is not a member of TODAY'S INDEX Cttirch Nefes Cemtcs Deaths Sports Tetevfeten Weather May Alt All A4 At B4 AS At cussion of intervention by SEATO while the Laos ap- peal rests before the UN. The United States is rush- nig aid to strengthen Laos' military defenses. A C47 tran- sport plane was handed over yesterday the first of six aircraft promised under the American aid program. Killed by 'Safe' Revolver Trick Patricia 18. .was .showing her girl friend yesterday a trick with a revolver. She removed five of the six bullets from a gun owned by her uncle. can pull the trigger five times now without getting she told 14-year-old Brcnda Stringer. Three times. put the gun to her temple and pulled the trigger. it's she after three clicks. The fourth the gun went .off. .Patricia .died in Maryland General hospital. Nikita Will Visit China Khrushchev Says He'll Travel to Peiping Sept. 29 Moscow Premier Ni kita S. Khrushchev is head ing for Peiping the day aft er he returns from his U.S visit. The Soviet leader said yes tcrday he would go to the re- Chinese capital Sept. 29. H did the purpos for the trip but it was clea he intends to brief commu nist China's government o his talks with President Eis enhower. China has approved of the talks bu western diplomats have sai they believed China felt lef out when the exchange of vis its was announced. The diplo mats said the Chinese may feel any easing of U.S.-Sovie tensions could damage he own position with Khrushchev made the sur Highway 41 through the Fox river valley began to feel the brunt of heavy traffic Friday evening. Early this morning The Death Toll Traffic M Boating 1 Non-boating drownings 0 Miscellaneous 1 TOTAL St cars were streaming up the major traffic artery to the north at a nearly bumper-to- lumper rate. A 19-year-old Columbia County youth became Wiscon- sin's first traffic fatality of the long weekend. Mervin L. route was killed early this morning when the car in which he was riding and another vehicle collided on Highway 16 in Rio. The National Safety Council estimated that heavy travel on the. highways might kill 450 motorists and pedestrians during the peak driving peri- od beginning at 6 p.m. Friday and closing midnight Monday in all time zones. Corresponding Period By only 307 persons died in motor crashes throughout the nation in a corresponding 78-hour period of a nonholiday weekend two weeks ago. That weekend was surveyed by the Associated Press to reach a figure against which to gauge the impact of holiday traffic. The first reported traffic fatality of the current holiday period was recorded at NorU late yester- day where a woman was kill- ed in an automobile-truck col- lision. Four marines en route home for the holiday were killcc when their car collided head on with a tractor-trailer near Va. They had been stationed the marine station. Another head-on collision o a truck and automobile killed three occupants of the car near Point Pleasant. W. Va The truck driver was injured Worst In History The council has cstimatcc that the traffic toll may reach 450 in the period that began at 6 p.m. local time Friday and will end at midnight Mon- day. From the fatality stand- point 1951 's Labor Day week- New Military Czar Emerges Argentine Leader Bows to Power of Ousted General Buenos Argentina Gen. Carlos Toranzo Montero emerged today Argentina's military czar er President Arturo Frondizt xwed to army demands. Reinstated as commander in Toranzo Montero gan planning a reshuffle in the nation's top military Ions. He did not disclose his but it is certain that prise announcement during'cmj was the worst in conversations with 652 persons died in traf- Joscf Cyrankiewicz of drownings and other acci- anu other officials at a dents such as plane ception opening the Polish in-'fires and accidents in homes dustrial exhibition here. land on farms. Question Former Convict Hope Diminishing 'By the Hour1 for Life of Missing Michigan Trooper officers who lost out in the near rebellion will be placed by generals to his ing. Toranzo Montero's pointment was followed the resignation of War tary who Elvio Anaya fired him in the man a dispute over army promotion Close Friend Anaya was succeeded by Gen. Rodolfo Larcher. a close friend of the commander in chief. Toranzo Montero said the crisis was strictly and not political. He said he. would order only and that a fevr military leaders will be tired. After reinstating Toranzo Montero last Frondizi refused to discuss the situa- tion with-reporters. The army chief freed four generals and a colonel who had been among 17 officers arrested on Anaya's orders in the wake of Toranzo Mon- tero's ouster. U. S. Exhibition in Moscow Closes Doors After 43-Day Show Moscow tfi Thousands of Russians waiting to get a glimpse of American life were disappointed last night when the first U. S. exhibition in Moscow closed its gates fore they could get in. But other Muscovites made the final day. U. S. cials said it was the biggest daily crowd since America opened its popular display of capitalist accomplishments 43 days ago. The which was the scene of the famous Khrushchev-Nixon kitchen was termed a success by the Soviet news agency Tass which said more than two lion visited the show. A U. S. official said Russians attended. East Mich. called off at nightfall Thomas Grant of the yesterday. j Grant said the man held j Soudcn's disappearance re- said the chances of finding a mys- ter ioosly missing state trooper alive dimin- ishing by the 1 The ex-con- vict he had set out to question when through the night in the cou- ple's modest ranch home in asking can't they find they know we need him you ever had icicles I fused a lie detector test i night and would be reques- Itioned today. Alvin W. 48-year-1 old ex-convict and you don't know mental was rushed I here for questioning after his arrest at a woodland cabin around your she asked as she cuddled her 7-month- old son. Edward. you how Find Sberel Knight was questioned hi northern Michigan yestcr-'about a shovel found in thV Seedea I day. Souden disappeared out- he vanished two days ago had'side downstate Howcll. no light on cabin. He denied having and said a the' he AT WlrtpWto Three Yevths Booked at Cceey police station Friday for beating and robbing an old man appear to find the situation far from serious. Handcuffed Thomas laughs as Vincent back to the leans his manacled band on a-rail. James chained to also laughs. They are accused of beating Harry Gard- New N. and robbing him of as bt sat on a boardwalk in the early morning hours seeking relief from the beat he bought 'shed no light on the dis-j Knight was seized as he lay gun from a hitchhiker appearance of 29 year old in bed. Tnc missing troopcr'Sjgave a ride. Trooper Albert Souden and gun was found in his belt. I The hunt for Souden was Capt. Grant Knight denied knowledge concentrated in Livingston found nothing to disprove his Refesed Test big problem Grant finding our of- A posse of scorcs_ of state deputies were ready to take np ancwj the wide and intensive of Soudcn's about 160 miles from1 but police said they the cottage where Knight was found in the cabin a note ad-j taken. dressed to Knight's mother. The state police car driven saying he would be gone for Souden on a routine as- few that police were after him and were checking Soudcn's distraught 23-year old signment to question Knight about a robbery was found abandoned yesterday on a river bank near Knight's home outside Howell. but Chance Rain Us Wisconsin Mostly sun- ny south and partly cloudy north today and with chance of a few scat- tered thundershowcrs in trcmc west and north por- tion. Warmer tonight and little change in temperature Sunday. Chance of ed Uiundershowers in cen- tral portion Monday. Temperature for 24-hour period ending at 9 a.m. High low 66. Temperature at 9 a.m. 74 with discomfort index at 71. Barometric reading at 30.07 with winds from the south at 14 miles per hour. Pollen Sun sets at p.m.. rises Sunday at moon sets Sunday at m m. Prominent stars Spica and Visible planets are Jupiter and tarn. SPAPJLRl   

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