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Appleton Post Crescent Newspaper Archive: September 4, 1959 - Page 1

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Publication: Appleton Post Crescent

Location: Appleton, Wisconsin

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   Appleton Post-Crescent (Newspaper) - September 4, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                               APPLETON POST CRESCENT VOL. LI No. 61 28 B SiPTiMBER ASSOCIATED PIUS8 WIRE SERVICE Price Seven Cents Unanimous Vote i For Fox Cities i Regional Plan Hammond Hired by Indiana Firm To Direct Its Local Office BY JACK GLASNER SUff Writer Fpx Cities regional plan is in first gear after two years of controversy over a planning proposal and about six years of talk. Two years and four months the Fox Valley Regional Planning commission was formally organized in the Little Chute village hall. Thursday night in the same the com- mission recommended its 10 member municipalities ratify a 3-year planning proposal submitted by Schellie and In- Ind. The vote was although nine of commission's 30 members were absent. All head.s of member municipal- ities were present. Last of Three The proposal is the last in a series of three by Schellie and is the first to give full r e s p onsibil- ity for the plan to the planning firm. A local office will be opened and it will be headed by Clarence H a m m ond. now commis- Hammond sion Schellie told the commission. Hammond will be a Schellie employe and the re- sponsibility for the plan rests squarely upon the commission was told by Schellie.' Explains His Vote The commission formally rejected all previous action on recommending plans it had recommended only before accepting the current plan. Kaukauna Mayor Joseph Bayorgeon cast his city's vote for the then explained the vote was given under the word of Schellie to hire Ham- mond. must exception to Kenneth Turn to Page Col. 7 labor Control Bill Goes f o White House Washington The house today completed congressional action on the labor controls bill and sent it to the White House for President Eisenhower's cer- tain signature. The had passed the senate 95-2 last night after more than eight hours of debate. The house action drama- tically capped the presi- dent's v biggest legislative victory of the session. It handed Eisenhower a bill patterned closely after his recommendations for legislation to cope with cor- ruption and racketeering in labor management rela- tions. The measure is the first important congressional re- vision of labor-management law since enactment of the Taft-Hartley law 12 years ago. The bill writes stringent new roles for protection of onion members rights. Heavier Tax Load Possible i For Middle Income Groups State Business Units Form Strong Coalition To Push for Sales Tax Bureau Madison The strongest sales tax campaign coalition ever put together was form- ed this week with the crea- for chief farm owner organization in the has called for thej sales tax to the pres- sure of real and personal tion of the Wisconsin Com- property taxes. mittee for Tax Revision. j The Committee for Tax Re-i The decision of the largest1 vision conspicuously offers business group m the state tojpersonal and property tax re- form an alliance is the most significant disclosure m the new push on behalf of sales tax in the November' session of the legislature. Organized Business The new united front is composed of the Milwaukee Association of the Wisconsin Manufacturers as- the Wisconsin Chamber of and the Special Taxpayers com- mittee on the state an off-shoot of the Public Expen- diture survey. Together they represent vir- tually all of the politically ac-jpcaled to th'e United Nations to live spokesmen for troops to help repel corn- Turn to Page CoU 8 Laos Appeals For UN Help Wants Troops to Aid in Battling Communist Attack has ap- business enterprise in the state. they have acted together rarely on a popular political although each of them has endorsed tax re- vision through incorporating the sales tax into the income- property tax structure of the state. Farm Support Arch named as a staff officer of the Alliance for pro- motion is the direc- tor of the survey and is wide- ly known for his frequent pub- lic speeches demanding tax reform. Some observers believe the sales tax alliance may win recruits because of the pat- munist the Laos em- bassy said today. Britain at once announced it favored UN action if aggression in Laos is proved. In its Laos accused communist North Viet Nam of intervening on the side pf the red rebels of Laos. In its Laos accused communist North Viet Nam of intervening on the side of the red rebels of Laos. A foreign office spokesman told a daily news conference j after the Laotian announce- ment was aggression is establish- the British government would obviously be in favor ol the United Nations taking ac- AP Wlrrpholo Antonio Cancell. Was the proudest boy in all New York City Thursday when his turtle won first prize as the most unusual entry in the Children's Aid so- ciety's pet show. His hard-shelled friend pokes his head out to exchange admiring glances with his youthful owner. tern of its proposal. The po- tion to deal with that aggres- tent Wisconsin Farm Bureau sion. Ike Begins Labor Day Vacation at Scottish Tour Completed Final Talks With French Result In Complete Agreement on Berlin ence of western leaders with Soviet Premier Nikita S. who is arriving Scotland President Eisenhower put aside his official cares' today for a short vacation as an honorary citizen of Scotland. He had accomplished his mis- sion to Europe to shore up the western alliance against communism. Ailsa Course With the nine days of diplo- matic work in London and Paris behind the president looking ruddy and fit. for a Labor Day weekend of rest and golf at Culzcan his Scottish vacation home. 'He tackled the beautiful 6.690-yard Ailsa five from the this afternoon. The weather in usually the dampest part of Students Will Enjoy Reading Hometown News College students arc making plans for their trips to campuses all over the United States. Thc Hurry of buying to fill the needs of two full semesters away from home has includ- ing type- and toilet- ries. Thoughtful parents also arc making arrangements to have the Post-Crescent sent to lhat college ad- dress. Nothing will equal the satisfied feeling ting news from ev- ery day from the pages of their hometown newspa- per. Washington after the week- end. Culzean castle is adminis- in Washington Sept. 15 toitcred by the national start an exchange of visits which supervises nation a 1 with the British was sunny and breezy. Scots gave Eisenhower the friendliest of welcomes. The president flew into Prestwick from Gaulle and other western he had talks with statesmen in Paris followed take place only when there is some possibility of definite Culzean Castle The consultation with dc monuments and beauty spots. Argentine General Challenges Ouster Claims Support of Most of Denies Try for Political Coup Governor Disturbed by Financial Burden Borne By Business and Industry BY JOHN WYNGAARD Foftt-Crrxrtnt MariUnn Bureau middle income groups would have to assume a heavier tax burden if the administra- tion revises the tax structure in accordance with find- ings of Gov. Gaylord Nelson's tax impact study com- mittee. After reviewing committee findings. Gov. Nelson to- day said he is by disclosures about weight of taxation on ness and industry. J The report shows families j in the to annual income bracket pay a smaller proportion of their earnings in tax than those above and below those levels. In the voluminous report which the governor will guide him in development of his own tax a commit- Rocket Plane Fails Again Second Attempt to Fly Famed XI5 Cancelled in Air tec of University of Edwards Air Force economists concluded that thei impact of taxation on facturcrs is greater in Wiscon- sin than in neighboring and that per capita taxation on the whole in Wisconsin is the highest among the seven states in this region. First Findings Thc economists revealed a disagreement about the im- portance of busiuehs taxation 1 as a factor in the location of but the governor ap- parently already has made up his mind. An X15 Boenos Argentina Gen. Carlos Toranzo Montcro today challenged the government's order ousting him as army declar- ing that 95 per cent of the army was be- hind him. Toranzo M o n t e r o made the statement aft- er a tense Gen. Anaya night during and declared there now would be a in the military crisis. ship went aloft today for what had been scheduled as its first power but technical difficulties cancelled the at- tempt. Test Pilot Scott Crossfield jettisoned his fuel about an. hour after the 50-foot long black dart took off fastened under the wing of a B52 bomb- er. Thc two planes then head- ed hack to earth. The two planes landed safe- ly a short the rock- one who is Intcrcstcdjct ship still in place. in promoting industrial expan- sion in this is dis- he said of the re- port. The governor summoned the capitol reporters to his cham- Turn to Page Col. 3 Scotland gave him a 16-room which President Arturo Fron- apartmenj. there announccd lhat troops marching on military I barracks where the general set up rebel headquarters. tion for his services as mander of western allied forces in World war II. Eisenhower played the Ail- sa course with Ian March- Charles de Gaulle on world is-iseparate meetings with Chan-lbank. the club sues and western including Algeria. They complete agreement West Berlin. cellor Konrad Adenauer ofUames P. an official at West Germany and Primej Culzean and Brig. Minister Harold MacmillaniGen. Sir James Gault. a of Britain. comrade in arms of They said a summit confer-1 Eisenhower is returning to.the president. He said he could not rcvcalj President VetOCS Second Shot j Housing Bill Washington P r c s i- dent Eisenhower today veto- ed the second-shot 000 housing bill which con- the deadline of the truce so as not to close the road to- ward understanding. While the general headed back to the rebel headquart- government sources said the resignation of Anaya ap- peared imminent. The crisis erupted Wednes- day when Anaya fired Toran- zo Montcro in a dispute over reshuffling of key posts in in .luly. There was no immediate in- dication as to the trouble. A leak in a hydrogen perox- ide line last week forced post- ponement of a scheduled pow- er flight at that time. The X15 is designed even- tually to blast a man to the edge of space and return him safely. Round Trip The tiny ship made the round trip attached to a bomber piloted by Crossfield's buddy. Air Force Capt. Char- les Bock. The mother ship rose swift- ly m the morning d'rivcn by its eight powerful to an altitude of TODAY'S INDEX Comics A1S A 4 Kankavna A 3 Sports AW Television B12 Women's Section Weather Map B Series on A14 Twin Cities B 1 Only two tanks appeared near the barracks but they their fire. Shortly before dawn. Toran- zo Montcro emerged from his stronghold in the army mech- anical school in the heart of the capital and went to Gov- ernment house for a SO-min- ule conference with Frondizi. army. Toranzo Montcro said defiant bland not repre- sent any to Frondi- zi's government because the trouble had no ori- Blame Fatal Train Wreck on High Heat Washington The in- terstate commerce commis- sion said today that 98-dcgrcc temperature triggered wreck that spilled freight cars He told newsmen wards the rebel officers areiof a trestle into a recreation not seeking to overthrow thejarca near Mcldrim. last Frondizi government. Their the general is with Secretary of War Elbio Anaya. Toranzo Montcro said June 28. Twenty-three per- sons were killed. The the most severe in the vicinity In many days. grcss had passed after he vc-jjct toed a more costly fcel Thcrc tnc slubby- winged X15 was to be cut ignite its twin four-bar- rel rockets and climb to 50.000 president in a message to the senate said the new bill like its predecessor goes too far. Although some of the fca-i Plans called for it to make .u r u n u la 100-mile circlc at that alti- tures of the first bill he vclo-l d rcachj a cd arc removed in the new flf 2QQQ mHcs an measure and some other M to Hdc m lures partially the a _ h land_ new bill in its most impor- tant provisions represents lit- UI Drunken Drivers Since Jan. 1 Americans Still With Cuba's Armed Forces May Lose Citizenship I Washington Any Am- who have remained 'with Cuba's revolutionary _ i government's armed forces William J. Buchanan. sincc Jan_ arc sub. he caused the rails to spread reached a truce with Frondi-jwith the result that 16 cars of his friend from 124-car train left the zi. the commission said. 21. of 405 Congress Ncenah. I 224. Douglas V. Bruce. of 218 N. Limvood avenue. on Page lo loss of lhcir L- s Clt. jizcnship. state department Famed Parish Priest Of Arctic Circle But He Can't Answer at Point Borrow DJSpUte MOtl'S Cldlm Point Barrow. Alaska I Civil War Houston. ter Williams is too old and Veteran Texas Legislator Sam speaker of the bouse of representa- right and J. George capitol team up Thursday to lower the helium filled and lead encased copper cornerstone box into place at Father Tom Cunningham. jthc pansh priest of the Arc- jtic. died of a heart attack yesterday in his cabin al this northernmost Up of the Unit- ed States. His death ended 25 years of missionary work in the larg-' 'ceWc.to comment on a re- cst Koman Catholic parish in port questioning his status the United States 150.000- as the only surviving vet- squarc miles of ice and tun-' cran of the Civil war dra above the Arctic Circlc. his daughter says. Father a na- Willie Mae with live of New came whom Williams has made Alaska in 1934. He first scrv-1 hjs homc for several years. on Little Diomedc island.. then established missions at Teller and Nome before com 'ing here. Typhoon Moves Near Coast of Red China Taipei. Formosa Ty- phoon Louise swept through Formosa today or. ils way Jo the red China leaving j Thc sources howcv- icr. that the decision will be made on the facts in mdivi- duaj cases. Thc comment came after Rep. Francis E. Walter chairman of the house committee on said yesterday he was informed by the dcoart- mcnt thai certificate of loss of United States citizen- ship by William Morgan will 'be fore the date Williams said he enlisted. Bndwcii said census roc- Hove Raincoat Handy ords and a check of the Na- tional Archives showed Wii- for Weekend Outing liams to be 103 rather than Williams has becn virtual- ly blind and deaf for several years. He was critically ill most of last month from the after-effects of a bout with pneumonia earlier this year. Too Young Scripps-Howard writer Lowell K. Bndwell wrote Thursday that a search of government records indicat- 116 as Williams claimed. Thc newsman said this would have made Williams 8 years old during the latter days of the Civil war. Texas Bricadc in an affidavit filed when he applied for a Confederate pension in said he was a forage master with Hood's Texas Brigade for 11 months near the end of the war. BridmcH said Bngadc was dis- banded before Wii. Items believes he Thc Scripps-Howard writ- commenting that Wii- the east central front extension of the capitol in Washington. Republican Minor- and m j ity Leader Charles watches the event The which weighs 82 8 contains congressional an old coinfpund_ dur- ing photos of cornerstone laying ceremonies and newspapers. jurcd. All but two of the casualties to have served as he claim- were recorded at an1 ed. and that the unit to town 75 miles which he said he was 'of Taipei. signed was broken up be- clouded said the last surviving veteran of the war was John Salhng of who died last March 16. Wisconsin Increasing cloudiness Saturday with moderate humidities. Show- ers likely over west and ex- treme northwest portions Saturday afternoon and eve- spreading eastward Saturday night. Sunday oul- considerable cloudi- 'ness with scattered showers and thundcrshowers. Appletcm Temperatures for 24-iioar pcnod ending at 9 a.m. High low 57. Temperature at 11 a.m. with discomfort index at 65. Barometric reading al 50.02. and wind from the southwest at 10 miles per hour. Pollen count. 1ST. Sun sets at rises Sgtarday at moon sets at pjrcx.   

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