Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Appleton Post Crescent: Tuesday, May 26, 1959 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Appleton Post-Crescent (Newspaper) - May 26, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                               ST-CRES VOL.LNp.75 APfUTOII MUHAII MtNASIiA. HN5DAY, MAY 19St Price Sevan Cents Faubus Loses Fight on School Board's Recall AT These Photos Tell the Story of a boy's an abandoned refrigerator in Mount Vernon, N. Y., after being missing for 16 hours. Five-year-old Pat Manco embraces Policeman Robert Forrest, right, after the officer rescued him. Hope of finding the lad was almost given up when Forrest made one final check of a junk- yard owned by Pat's father and found the boy near death. Urges Added Atomic Pacts Agreement Would Include 4 Nations, Eisenhower Says Washington W) Presi- Assail Democrats GOP Says Politics Hampers Program Washington Republi-i very adequately with the mat- has refused to trim money can congressional leaders directly to thej Halleck mentioned or interfere Dulles7 Body Now in National Cathedral Lies in State for 24 Hours Before Services Tomorrow; World Leaders to be Present Fos-jmyko, one of Dulles' chief ad- ter Dulles' body was brought'versaries in the cold war, to lie in state today in a quietjwas flying to Washington to- j vaulted chapel of imposing! day for the funeral. National cathe-j He left the foreign minis- House Refuses To Cut Funds For President Also Won't Reduce Entertainment Cash Of State Department house! casket'through a chapel doorj w'" R, y ld _   and Doug- Turn to Page 8, Col. 1 Group to that nation certain non-nu- 11 Halleck and Sen. Everett clear parts of atomic weapons !M Dirksen of Illinois, the to improve the training andjaje 'Washington Sen. Ev- knowns here, have kept their own counsel as to their plans. Faubus twice went on tele- vision in the closing days of because Soviet Foreign Min- for retention of the segrega- ister Andrei Gromyko alreadyjtionists. He called the contro- had taken off for ovsr of the teach- Earlier, Gromyko and Brit- ish Foreign Minister Selwyn Lloyd, who represented the west, agreed that on Friday when the conference resumes ers a smoke screen for inte- gration. The governor urged the ous- ter of the three moderate members. Their supporters rOSl it will go into private sessions, had started the recall move- The private meetings arejment. The moderates walked designed to permit more seri-jout of a board meeting May ous negotiation on Berlin, when the segregationists be- on a summit confer- gan their teacher purge. Two days later a group of business and professional me a i armed services will lod.y .ppved Ogden R. Herter spelled out details of Turn to Page 8, Col. 6 Turn to Page 8, Col. 1 Rnth uotn M. Dirksen- of said "when we get to theiwalch untl1 lhe nomination as ambas- onerational readiness of Can I predicted at the White Housejpoint where we can't trust the ice tomorrow. sador to Israel by a 10-4 vote operational readiness of Can ;wlth newsmen after the week-jloday tnat tne senate win of the United states! funeral, the casket over the opposition of Chair-; rail session of GOP leaderl Lewis L. Strauss as a million dollars then it's! will be moved from the chap- man J. William Fulbright (D- t r f tW o. foricongress with President Eis-jret f comerce. itime to get another president.; el into the great cathedral. transfer of; certain secret They gave no said he reviewed'You've got to trust sorne-i Burial will be in Arlington: Sen. Theodore Francis formation in the atomic whether Eisenhower' di important nomina -body (National cemetery across the Green former chair-; The pact with West Ger- shares their views on ith lh Dresident and! A voice vote defeated the; Potomac from Washington, jman of the committee, and many, the Netherlands and poinl. th. Soviet Russia's Andrei Gro-lSens. John F. Kennedy (D- Turkey is based on an agree- ment reached in Paris in De- cember 1957. Halleck called it "a little unfortunate that the stampede Hoffa Opens Bitter Attack on Reuther i Strauss: j "I think there are enoughi Drunken Drivers Since Jan. 1 Mass) and Russell B. Long joined Fulbright in op- posing Reid, 33, former presi- dent and editor of the New York Herald-Tribune. But the committee gave UAW Spokesman Replies to Teamster Chief's Charges R. Hot-1 lent, but an official UAW for the Democratic t f confirmalion... CHafleS A. Ward t.on for president has started) Earljer at lhe capjto, pirk. ;vnonw M. wrur 50 'sen had indicated he believed f% j m If was having success 1011101 6, and unanimous volcejfa and WaRer P Reuther are spokesman said Reuther vote approval for President! would not dignify what he call- Eisenhower's nomination vci hal swords points. JIoffa.s -absurd allega- career diplomat .John M. Cab-j Hoffa, president of the tions" wjth a reply. said the hopefuls 113. Harry 67, Chicago. Tola. are jus missionary work in be- forsome1half of Strauss. I Afting to say "I feel decently happy about' That, he added, is the stand- the E. Van Dyke ,ard way to seek a presidential, be c-ollTirmed Dirksen nomination find that some members! j Asked whether Halleck had, C. fcgner, Jr., refieclecj his views, Headed Large Firm ot, 57, now ambassador to Co-j Teamsters union, said in Bos- that Reuther, A-.7. H.U.Ck Plan to See Khrushchev Drawing Little Support lombia, to be ambassador tojton yesterday nrp willine in! St. Paul Charles AJthe St. Paul firm rose from! Brazil. L nu LI_. itiC Willing LU i it f i_. A i 11 I listen to quiet, persuasive ar-jWard, who rose from a parson UlTiE liLS 91, H Jllg n level Oil iCSS W911QC 3nCl pi ISO" in- 4 l-i wi 111 i S t 31 f OF iT i JZU t.S. 110 ill 91 j t m ore i n o n JTI 11 i o n i a L v, t 1.1 n t j i v o this matter. mate to head one of the na-'year and a force of Eastern affairs. ithcr "hid out" from Detroit However, the union spokes- man, Frank Winn, director of (president of the United Auto UAW Public relations, went jWorkcr.s, has "no brains, no Sen. A. S. Mike Monroney largest advertising He was also board chair-! Sen. Green, 91, issued who voted against: ate com-, approved: Los Angeles while on a busi- .u ciakv firms died last nicht of eight Brown Bige-jstatement in which he said of Strauss when the senate llrms- fllca iast subsidiaries. line battles in the 1930s. Reuther, in Detroit, was si- few as Washington A New would have a voice in anyimargin of as York congressman got little, such venture of an official na-ivotes backing today for his described the plan as nounced plan to take a con- news to them. Privately, one Assembly Votes Cities gressional subcommittee to of them indicated skepticism Moscow for space talks with that such a trip will be made Power to Condemn Nikita S. Khrushchev. under congressional sponsor- Congressional leaders who. ship. Land WITHOUT Tells of Proposal merce committee the nomination by a 9-8 votemcss trip. He would have last week, said he had been 73 Friday. told senate action could go for; Ward was president Q00 acres dairy farms and since he graduated from col- or against the appointee by a j general manager ot Brown _ r.t two Bigelow, St. Paul, a firm he I had headed since 1933. Officials of thc firm here were- notified that Ward was reading in bed in a Los An- Charlie Makes Home on Small Island for Nignf The int r e p I d Charlie House presents a column today written while he made his temporary home on a small island about 35 miles from Ottawa. This is another of the reports about his long journey to the Fox Cities along the proposal to geles hotel wncn he was stricken. Cause of death was not determined immediately but it believed to have Reid: Ward's family home was at "He has had no diplomatic udson, Wis., near St. Paul.iexperience whatsoever, D I where he managed about experience in the decade J TOUnQ reOple maintained a buffalo herd. He lege has not been of a naturcipifi jn SmOShuD also owned two ranches in to require competence in di- Arizona. plomacy." Five young people were kill- boss; against the teamsters ji chieftain. Winn in the past ed when their car hag becn the Plans for the trip were re- chango thc constitution to give resulted from a heart, attack. ported yesterday by Chair-.c.itios and villages power to Known as Philanthropist who in recent, years man Victor L. Anfus (D-NY) ;condeiYin land without a .jury of a house space subcommit- verdict was passed by the as- xvas known for nl- tee on international cooper-1 sembly, 65 to 31, today and ation and security. sent to the senate. He told a reporter his 6-man: A group of Milwaukee Dem- group plans to go to who voted against the a week factory apprentice lie after congress adjourns this! proposal last week, swung had befriended thr late H.H. summer Thev hope to makeiovcr to help push the measure Bigelow. then president, summer. hope torn hjt a lhe uvo were scrving sentenc- Premier snag last week when it failed es at Leavenworth and humanitarian ac-com- plishments. came to Brown Bigelow in 1925 as a federal KhriKjhfhpv for pM'-t-west co- lo draw lne required 51 votes P1 lson- Khrushchev, for .t west co Ward became foreman and operation in outer space exploration of several hundred years ago. tion was :5 to pave later departmental superin- the wav for today's action. 'tondent. then general manag- "We hope to talk to all of; Joseph Greco n-Milwaukee or. When Bigelow drowned in route used bv Jean Nicolet the top Anfuso said .ho f1ght agajnsl p.lssage a hlinting aPrident in 1933, the He said he had discussed.contcnding lhe jury vcrdicl is board of directors elevated necessary to protect a prop- Ward from vice president to erty owner's rights. A Milvvau- president. house space committee slum ciearance project is The two met in Leavenworth that Brooks raised no objec- being carried out in his dis- while Ward served a term on tion. Itrict. a narcotics charge he said But Brooks himself com-i was "trumped-up" because of mented, "It's news to me. I ConqrettrpOn WithrOW his association with other peo- have never heard of it." pic. Bigelow served a term for He declined to say whether for Surgery income tax evasion Ward lat- he would lend his support! o_ was granted a presidential; LJvciai iiuiiiiit.il Turn to Page A-9 to read he ldca f n is account of the day's his happenings written by the light of a campfire. Tele Alt Weather t to the Moscow Journey bu noted that thc'house. in entercd Walter Reed hos- Rep. (R-Wis) to- year, any. foreign travel Full committee and possibly even Alon in for gerv Wednesday morning An officc did Approval, close the nature of the ail- tions and research, hospitals Reuther Hoffa on to carry the lance for his into a bridge on Highway and Reuther's, Icial voice. offi- south of here early today. It was Iowa's worst traffic I accident of thc year. Dead are Leonard Marvin Honeycutt. 18; Edward E. Bil- linfis, 16, and Patricia Ann Jones. 17, all of Keokuk, and Gives Views to Reporter In recent years the two De- presidents of the power- ful labor unions have made it clear there was little love lost between them, although their comments have been limited. Robert Branch, 22. and No-j made his remarks to nne Corns, 18, both of Fort rcporlcr Dick LaMere of Marlison- the Boston Traveler. They apparently were dnv- Askcd his reaction to Reu- ing north toward Fort recent statement that ison from Keokuk when thinks "with his car struck the one-way bridge the teamsters five miles south of here, Dep- leader said: July Sheriff Ralph Einstanjer: "Walter Reuther had no said. brains, no guts and hid out in It was not immediately dc-j Turn to Page 8 Col 2 termincd who was driving a 1954 Ford, which was' registered to Mrs. Violet Beat- rice Branch, mother of Robert Branch, he said. Chance Four of the persons were killed outright. Billings, who: was thrown from the and1 landed in Devils creek, died! at a Fort Madison hospital about an hour later. No Soviet Action on ftorlin Berlin Tomorrow is the deadline Soviet Premier! Wisconsin Increasing thunderstorm activity over the west portion of the state, spreading eastward tonight. Mostly cloudy and cool to- morrow with scattered showers. Appleton for the 24-hour period end- ing at 0 a.m.: High, 71, tow, BO. Temperature at 11 76. Southeast wind 11 JteMmn Ttat John L. Lewh Is seen with a smile jNikita s. Khrushchev origin-i miles per hour; ally set for ending the mili-i 992 inches. tat It w., nM eon- and The bushy-browed United Mine Worker, okay, wotild be needed for the sidered serious. The congress- M thousands of individuals! union leader WM NUght chuckling remark made subcommittee to travel un- man is expected to be at the get a fresh start after adver-j Virginia aneMv in fler MMCressional ausbicet ttihosDital tar to during a function Of UM VITflllM aUM.MNMty IB (ter congressional tOTfrnmciK txpense for dayi to two.sity. I During Ward's j Wuhington. tary occupation of West Ber- lin. But the Soviet embussy assurancet today that nothing will done M 6un at p.m., rises Wednesday M HI I JINIUII n at a.m. INEWSPA'PERr   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication