Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Appleton Post Crescent Newspaper Archive: May 16, 1959 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Appleton Post Crescent

Location: Appleton, Wisconsin

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Appleton Post-Crescent (Newspaper) - May 16, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                               APPLETON POST CRESCENT VOL. L No. 67 28 A, B APFLETON-NEENAH-MENASHA WIS., SATUKDAY, MAY WIKK MOtVICS Price Seven Cents Battle Near On Problem of Beer, Minors State Senate Close To Vote on Bill to Raise Age Limit Fost-Crevceni Madison Bureau Ike to Tour Air Force's Academy President Eisenhower headed for Colo-j rado today to tour the Airj Force academy and visit his-- ailing mother-in-law. Traveling in the presidential plane Columbine III, he took off from the Washington air- at a. m. for the 6-hour flight to Colorado Springs. There he will greet the Air; Madison Beer and young Force academy's first gradu- people will provide the basis; ating class atld get his first on- for lively activity in the look at the school lature during the next week. j whicBh nestles at the easterni onToneSeofSie edfe Rocky mountains produced great pressure the president both sides during the last six i from Washington for the acad-; weeks -the Donnelly tour are Air Force Sec. alto raise state-wide the legal i James H. Douglas and Gen. age for beer buying and D- White, air force chasing to 21 years. chief of staff. Fires, Traffic, Trains, Guns Kill 30 Persons Across U.S. Strong Drink Wisconsin law sets 18 vears Also going alwg are the president's son and daughter- as the minimum age for army major and Mrs purchase of beer by any per- John Eisenhower, and their son. State law sets a 21 year! four youngsters, minimum age for the sale of j Fly to Denver strong drink to any person. Eisenhower is expected to But Wisconsin at the academy for at ties on their own a couple of hours. From are permitted to the party will fly north more restrictive codes and to Denver, a 15-minute hop. many of them have done so.; Denver is the home of Mis It "is" estimated that in 150 Eisenhower's mother, Mrs. Wisconsin municipalities, rep- John S. Doud, who was 81 last resenting about -three The first lady al ters of the population of the; ready is at the Doud reM state, there are now local or- denee. She arrived earlier in dinances forbidding the sale the week by train to be on of beer to any person under hand for her mother's birth- any the age of 21 years. i day. Dulles' Condition Said to be Worse Family Gathers in Washington to 9 Burn to Death; 7 Students Perish Thirty persons are dead across the nation today in tragedies including murder, suicide, traffic crashes, fires and leaps from buildings. Seven teenagers were killed in a oar-train crash at Mat- toon, 111., in the worst single tragedy. A family of five died in a house fire and another family of four perished in a rail- road crossing accident. Four children died in another fira in Missouri. old pedestrian, died in a hospital. After Kelly shot, himself in the head, his car smashed into a taxi, then struck the Seven1 pedestrians. I. o n s d ale was !caught underneath the car. It Killed After School Dance had jus'J Walloon, 111. young people who a him haK city block left a high school dance wcrejbcforc a bystander stopped it. killed early today, and one1 was critically injured in Three Df6 111 grade crossing collision with! a crack Illinois Central OF sen get' train. The 20-t-ar San Vrancisco Four Remember the Fox Cities Area's record-breaking snow last winter? Magnificent snow drifts are a mat- ter of course in the great Northwest. Here Washing- ton state highway department officials pose under a marker on the scenic road from Seattle to Yakima, AP Wiri-llholo Wash., via Chinook pass and around mammoth-sized Mount Rainier, after snowplow crews Friday cut through 22 feet of snow to clear the road for travel. This is one field in which the Fox Cities are not in- terested in excelling. Slayer Back Be Near Stricken Former Diplomat Djr Qi __ im __ .Tnhn eanrer had soread to his Washington (m John, cancer had spread to his Foster Dulles' condition W0rse. i On April 15 President Ei- His family has gathered senhower, with great reluct- here in the city to be closeiance, announced Dulles' re- to him. In addition to his wifejsignation as secretary of and brother, Allen, who heads'state. The president retained the central intelligence agen- Dulles as a personal consult- cy, they include his three chil-iant. dren and three sisters. The former secretary ofi state, weakened by the can- cer that has spread through his body, contracted a mild case of pneumonia last week- Ci, KIRf end. Yesterday state Ul INDV- ment press officer Lincoln SalD lie-' employes" McLaughlin Says He Fears Actions Of Patients, Guards West May Agree to Discuss Berlin Apart From Package New Orleans bound from Chi-j persons jumped or fell from cago, carried the auto a quar-lhigh places yesterday in San ter of a mile. j Francisco and a fifth was The dead were Jerry from a 16th floor ledge 18; Irene Moon, 16; a building just across the Keen, 18: Dorothy Thomasjbay in Oakland. 18; Loraine Pfeiffcr, 17, Three of the four were her 18-year-old brother, Lisle Jed, the other injured crlti- jall of Sbelbyville, 111., andically. lerry Mayes, 19. of Wood-' Killed in plunges from sep- awii, 111. arate downtown buildings were Velma Fowler, 70-year- old spinster; Robert Stewart, 72, and Finon H. Sills, 56, for- mer vaudeville performer. George Yomeda, 70-year-old caretaker, was hurt when A family of washing a Two Fires Take lives of Nine Move Designed as Pry to Break Current Deadlock With Russians I TV Employes Milwaukee Haroid W.i McLaughlin, the admitted! slayer of little Ben Geneva The western for agreement, however, re was once more under today were to be seen, for Russia and key in a state to discuss Berlin apart has so far stood firm on its I hospital today and was given; from, their package plan for; demand for demilitarization jspecial protection from the 'Germany in an attempt to'of West Berlin, and the wes- 'break the deadlock with the tern powers are standing pat pneumonia completely resolved. There has been some further voted to :work stoppage that April 27. NBC television and from other inmates. "I'm afraid to go .on their refusal to ahandonj ,..u-year-old McLaughlin said; Russians. the communist-encireled city, i as three officers re-j The big four foreign minis-; Secretary of State Christian turned him to Central conference recessed over A. ilertcr is flying to Rome hospital at Waupun. "The pa- the weekend with the Soviets today for a quick ]-day good-: decline in his general condi- tion." At Walter Reed army pital his condition was report- ed unchanged this morning. Dulles, 71. entered the hos- pital last Feb. 12. Spread to Neck Tn 1956, an operation had removed a cancerous growth in the colon. This February. in the course of a hernia op- eration, army doctors discov- illiams. the ered that the cancer had'veteran and t end a started tients and guards talked about: what they'd like to do to the dill insisting on the signing of man who killed the little Peace hos-: radio Fm afl.aid operations have been ing with supervisory person- nel taking over in place of feeble-minded, and striking technicians. they might be WcLaughiin. who has been German thing treaty states with the two above every- originally committed April 21 for molesting a child, was placed in a maximum se- curity unit where he will stay until- released for trial on first degree murder charges. He nation's oldest admitted the slaying Wednes- e sole survivor day. Ben was killed April 4. Last Civil War Vet To Ride in Parade Houston, Yankus, Family spread of Civil war forces, planned a "A very close eye is being They gave Dulles huge ra-rare outing today. kept on him in view of his diation treatments, both with Williams. 116. planned to comments about returning." a giant X-ray machine and ride in an a said Supt. Dr. Edward Schu- hy injecting radioactive gold physician along in today's berl. salts into his abdomen. Armed Forces day parade. Police in suburban Wauwa- In April Dulles left the bos-1 The one-time Confederate tosa said McLaughlin was be- AUSlTCillQ pital briefly for a stay in forage master became the ing cheeked out as a matter Florida only Civil war veteran recent-of routine in the rape-slaying Chicago For a time it even appear-'ly with the death of'.Iohn Sail- of Mrs. Kdna Mauch. 57, who kus and hi.- fd that his tremendous pow- uig, also a Confederate veter- was beaten to death with a of recuperation and will an, of Slant, W.Va. ,briek in a sock last summer, on would prevail. else. Hope Persists But hope persisted among western diplomats of finding a formula for agreement on the future of divided Berlin. The crisis triggered by Rus- sia's demand for western withdrawal from West Berlin Presumably is expected to move steadily to the fore as the second week of the conference develops. Whether thorp is any basis will visit. French foreign min- ister Maurice Couve cte Mur- ville is going to Paris for con- sultations with President de Gaulle. Soviet foreign minis- ter Andrei A. Gromyko and British foreign secretary Sel- wyn Lloyd are staying in Ge- neva over the weekend. Prepare Keply Gromyko and his in long range consultation with the Krem- reported preparing a point-by-point reply to the western package plan. Gro- myko has already turned down the package as a whole, denouncing it as a tangle of unrelated issues which would make any progress here im- possible. ers to go on April 12 the hospital. Thp doctors he Then returned to reported the Today's Paper Has 2 Special Items for Kids Today's Post Crescent has two special features of interest to members of the younger set. First are several stories nnd pictures on open house at the new James Madison Junior High School. Par- ents also have been invited to visit the school Sunday afternoon to see Apple-ton's newest school building. Second is the Kids Ko1- nm, now running in the ant ad section. It provides free ads for children from 6 to 15. They will be run until May 20. Ad forms can be picked up at the Post- C'rrscent. TODAY'S INDEX Comics Peaths Editorials Kaukauna Sports Television Women's Map Twin Cittei R .1 Alfi A 4 A 2 A S A 5 All All 9 I Western officials say he Yan-'niay pull various points out family were Aus- of the parcel and seek to dis- tralia-bound today following cuss them individually. Ber- th L- sale of his Dowajjiac. I in is one such issue. en .Mieh.. poultry farm because though communist spokesmen of a government fine for have rebuffed the specific growing too much uheat. western proposal for nif-rgitiR "It's not pleasant to west Yankus said yesterday as he Berlin Prices Take Trimming in Barber War i Irving, Texas Bar- gain-minded fathers and their bushy-haired sons eagerly lined up today to got 15-cenl trims with free shoe-shines and snow cones during the price war of feuding barbers. Participants are F.d Cox, a realtor who owns the Irv- ing boulevard barber shop, and his two former employ- T. H Mr-roll and Jay Simmons, who now operate their own shop J50 feet down tht; street. (.'ox opened hi.s shop eight months ago but says he didn't make enough money from a 70-30 split arrange- ment with H.-HTeli and Sim- mons to cover hi.s invest- ment. "I wanted to out of the barber Cox said. "I Harrel! first, chance to buy the place." Ilarroll said the asking price was too high so he and Simmons derided to set up their own shop. Cox first cut uhe pi-ice of a haircut, from a dollar to cents. Rv todav he was story window. St, Louis ive perished early today in a fire that engulfed their .n north St. Louis county. Last night, 160 miles to south, four children were kill- .-.ii mm ,1 d in a fire that destroyed fVfflS heir frame farm home neari Neelyville, Tvlo. Houston, The St. Louis county George Rainer wept Urns were a mother, father; softly as he talked of his and their three children, ages! daughter, a pretty choir girl 8 months, 2 years and 7 years. who took her mother's life with Their last names were Bcn-j a shotgun. nett, but complete identifica-l "I never had a minute'i tion was not immediately; trouble with that Ma- available. said. "She never talked back The fire near Ni-elyville kill-! or anything." ed four children of Mr. and] Darlcne Rainer, 14, sobbed Mrs. Charles L. Wray, who out a story of strict family dis- had moved there recently from Tucson, cipline yesterday which communist Kast, a single city un-! transferred to a train for San Francisco. ''The thing that hurls nle most is that I spent Hi yeai- working for a farm and now it's gone. I dnn't think should have been fined for trying 10 make my own liv- ing." Yankus was fined 070. Mrs. Yankus wasn't an- xious to leave. "It's hard to go.'' she said. "It's a long wav." der four power guarantees. in down to 15 cents but. having trouble keeping his prom- ise of a free shoe shine. Four Killed in Oklahoma City Oklahoma City (fft crack Frisco railroad pas- iscnger train collided with a pickup truck, last night, kill- ing four and turning a family outing into tragedy. I Killed when their truck col- with the train at a crossing in suburban Jones, Okla., .were Thomas W. Bur- rows, 33. of near Jones; his !.sons Tom. 10, and Rodney. 4; and h i s nephew, James i Blackburn, 7. Pedestrian and Driver Killed i St. Petoi-tshurg, Fla. A motorist shot himself yes- terday while driving along a main thoroughfare and his car ran down three pedes- trians. Vcrnon Donald Kelly, 22, the i driver, and Percy Lonsdale, a said led to the shooting of her mother, Mrs. Lena Rainer, 38. The woman was struck by a gunshot blast as she cradled her 11 -month-old son, feeding him. The baby, Ronald Wayne, A was unhurt. 60 Days of Seclusion Ahead for Godfrey in Battle Against Cancer New York Godfrey has to public life Arthur' 'au revoir' for 60 davs to The Yankus' and their three follow orders explicit- children will board a ship in San Francisco Monday for Australia. Charges Saddy Wants Racing in Wisconsin Madison Sen. mir M) Milwaua kee) asserted Friday thai 'Fred Saddy, secretary of the slate Athletic commission, is "fronting for somebody lo bring horseracing to Wiscon- sin." Asked to comment. Saddy said in Milwaukee: Severe Punishment Failed to Lessen the love. Don: aid. 3, and Arthur, Jr., 5, right, have for their father. With their hands in bandages they display their love for Arthur Murray after he appeared in court in New York where was accused for punishing the boys for stealing by holding their over lighted burn- ers of a gas stove. ]y in recuperating from a lung cancer operation. The CP.S radio and televis- ion star left Columbia Presby- terian hospital w e a k, trembling man but grateful to be alive. Speaks to Press Although aides tried to hus- tle him away immediately to his New York apartment, the red-haired performer re- fused. He spoke to the press and ffsked through reporters to convey his thanks to so many well wishers who have followed the results of his Takes Own Life With Shotgun Fort Pierce, Fla., A man with a shotgun pressed against, his head listened while two sheriff's deputies pleaded with him last night to drop the weapon. Then Harold R. Lawyer, 50, cried "no! it's too and pressed the trigger, kill- ing himself while the offic- ers, patrons and carhops of a drivein barbecue watched helplessly. Child Struck By Cement Truck Angeles, Calif. Four- year-old Clayton Dickenson, who wandered from his home i while a grandmother cared for him, was killed by a ce- ment truck Friday. His moth- er was at work. Both Drivers Die in Crash In-his statement, he elabor-'1 West Salem, Ohio Both drivers died in their flaming trucks which crashed T bend-on near here Friday, why I got the doad arc Roy Crah. tree. I.odi, Ohio, and Donald Sislcr, of Friendsville, Md. aterl on his getting a break. He declared: "f know why I got the break. I got it because so many people prayed for it. I'll have to admit that I didn't pray for it. because I never ask for anything for myself and besides, I have already had too many breaks. I only ask to be worthy of whatever is granted." Kate Chances After spending some time at hi.s home here, the 55-year-old Godfrey will go to his ac-re Virginia farm. I According to generalized' figures from the American! Cancer society, the chances; are 25-1 to 50-1 against God-, frey's survival. There is no! [whether the cancer in the left "I can't understand him. 1 don't know a race horse from surgery. a bale of hav Later from his Manhattan During Senate debate on the Godfrey dictated a Arthur GorffftV state's executive b u d g e t, 000-word statement released Saddy had for publication through CRS, surgeon) got it out, under eir-fore operation told the Joint Finance commit- concerning his recent, opera- cumstances so trying that one medical practice still requireii tee that horse racing would tion, and hopes for the future, slip or the other and I a five year period fit close help solve the state's financial Godfrey had told newsmen wouldn't be here talking to servation the operation! problem, that "I got a (the you." lean a a.m. 'lung spread from the lung be-j ;ir- fore operation. If it Foresee Some Showers For Pretty cloudy and a little warmer, with possibilities of showers to- night and Sunday. High ex- pected Sunday in the 60s. 'Low tonight expected in 40s. Appleton Temperature! during the 24-hour period ending at 9 a. m. this morn- ing: High, HO; low, 40. Tem- perature At 10 a. m. today, 57. Wind out of MtMtl lit an hour. Barometer M 90.00 Sun gets at es Sunday at a.m.! lEWSPAPERI STEWSPAPER!   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication