Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Appleton Post Crescent Newspaper Archive: May 11, 1959 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Appleton Post Crescent

Location: Appleton, Wisconsin

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Appleton Post-Crescent (Newspaper) - May 11, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                               APPLETON POST CRESCENT VOL. L No. 62 34 AmfTON-NfENAH-MENASMA, W1S., MONDAY, MAY aawvicc Price Big 4 Talks Open in Geneva After Delay Ci goref s and liquor Won'f Bear Stamps Start Hours Late Due to Dispute Over E. Germans Geneva The Big Four foreign ministers conference' was called into session to- night, 3i hours late, after rurining aground for a time on Washington The government today ed its historic policy of col- lecting liquor and cigaret excise taxes through the sale of tax stamps. Start- ing June 24, the industries will, pay the tax by filing returns twice a month. About billion now is collected each year through the sale of such stamps. The industries have long lobbied for scrapping of the stamp system. They com- the'quesUo'n "of'ho'w "the Pained that large amounts German government should! of working capital 3 Injured in Bay Tornado; 5 Killed in Other States participate. The first session of the con- ference was scheduled for the Palace of Nations at p.m. Instead, Sec. of State Chris- tian A. Herter and his Soviet, British and French counter-i parts got together informally i at a British villa. From this meeting Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei A.I Gromyko emerged with the; announcement the formal ses-i sion was 'set for 6 p.m. (12 noon Full Agreement were tied up because they had to buy the stamps in advance of bottling or packaging their products. 15-Day Reports Under the new distillers and tobacco man- ufacturers will file returns twice a month covering shipments during the pre- ceding 15 days. Taxes will be paid when returns are filed. Internal revenue service officials said details of the procedure haven't been "There has been a complete! out vet agreement on all procedural; and administrative he said, adding that this in-! eluded the question of Ger-j man participation. j Gromyko left the informal) parley first. He was followed; by Herter, French Foreign; Ministers Maurice Couve dej Murville and British Foreign; Sec. Selwyn Lloyd. j Lloyd, designated to preside; at tonight's Opening led the efforts to resolve the1 dispute involving the whole is-j tobacco sue of the status of the red said. "This will East German regime. James P. Richards, pres- ident of the Tobacco Insti- tute, Inc., said the action will save the government money and lift part of the industry's financial burden at the same time. "It is estimated that the government has been spending at least million per year in printing, han- dling and distributing the blue so familiar to Richards no longer be necessary." EX-POW Gives Self Up Escaped Camp Bufner When War Neared End 47 Mile an Hour Winds, Churned Up by Twister, Cut Through Fox Cities A tornado struck with a savage roar about p.m. Sunday, slicing paths of destruction through Green Bay and its suburbs of Preble and Ashwaubenon. Three per- sons were injured. Winds up to 47 miles per hour, churned up by the tornado, ripped through the Fox Cities at the same time. Damage here was minor and no injuries were reported. Tornadoes killed five persons, injured at least 21 and caused heavy damage in Texas, Oklahoma, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois and Michigan, the Associated Press reports. The winds that hit the Fox Cities were accom- panied by heavy rain, thun- der and lightning. Tornado warnings were in effect. The civil defense communica- tions network relayed Took Children Info Basement Lightning Gave Man View of Tornado's Funnel BT'BOBERT RANKIN jkltchen police when a ser- Cincinnati "I never: overheard hirn translat- was a nazi and never wanted ling conversation between a to go back to Germany under Russian and a Czech. any c, o n d i- tions." That was the quiet state- ment in flaw- less English by a balding Ger- man army of- ficer, Lt. Kurt Ross rn e i s 1, sought by the FBI for the last 14 years. The. next thing I knew, I was transferred to a Ian-; iguage school in Berlin and a short time later commission- ed a second lieutenant." That led to duty as an inter- preter in North Africa with Rommel's Afrika Korps. He was captured there. Decided to Escape Rossmeisl was at a POW camp at McCain, Miss., for five months from October, Contents of the Garage and House lie in the fore- ground of the Kenneth Cormier home in the town of Ashwaubenon near Green Bay after a Sunday night tornado peeled off a side of the house. The house was AP Wlrepholn in tthe path of a violent storm which cut through Ashwaubenon, Green Bay's southwest and the suburb of Preble. At the same time 47-mile-per-hour winds battered Appleton but no damage was caused. Shorter Hours Union Goal -_Steel Negotiations Now Underway on Industry-Wide Basis New York Industry- Rossmeisl. now 52 and an 11943, and then shifted to But- expert linguist, said he faded "When the war was about into anonymity in Chicago ne "j decided wide steel negotiations open and stayed there after escap-1that'l did not want togo'today with the Steehvorkers ing in August, 1945, from oner-of-war Camp Butner, N.j "i had received a month C. He finally surrendered a lieutenant and had the FBI here yesterday. 30 cents a day doing immigration and naturalize-1 extra work and thought I ion tion service holds a hearing use this money to es- today on his status in with." country. The FBI turned over Ross- meisl to the immigration and naturalization service, but he was released pending to- day's hearing. A spokesman for the service said Rossmeisl cannot be charged with il- legal entry into the U. S. be- Employment Up Million in April, U. S. Report Shows Jobless Down by As Economy Gains Sharply The num- Of 1493 ooo from the recession union expected to d emand'ber of Americans at work condiUons in April of lastj shorter hours and more pay.'rose by over a million in April Four-man industry and un- to a record total of 65 mil-! The 1957 figurcs ;n April teams will attempt to lion. Unemployment 64i26] ,000 employed and agree on a new contract in by 735.000. 2.690.000 unemployed. He was wearing dark glass- Turn to Page 18, Col. 4 in both Ike Asks for Part in Bank Would Help in Development of American Nations in- formation from the Green Bay weather station to area radio stations. A twisting windstorm hit the outskirts of Ann Arbor, Green Bay-Leonard about w flm noski. his wife and their repom indicated children were asleep Sundayjthal one wornan had been night when a tornado scream-j electrocuted, two houses were ed out of the southwest andjon fire and several damaged. cut a swath of fury through! Three A twister cut a path of de- the area. struclion along the edge of "I didn't know what was the central Illinois town of Wisnoski said.! Monticcllo just before dawn. "I thought a train was mak-jt cracked a wall and dam- jing that noise but it kept get- aged the roof of a 1-story ting louder and louder. I clos-i plant, upset two parked truck ed the bedroom door and then trailers, shattered windows the roof fell in. My wife and and snapped utility poles. I ran to our children's rooms There were no injuries, and took them into the base- jn Green Bay six homes ment. jwere demolished and at least House Moved 150 others received heavy A neighbor ran in. He damage, all upset. He said, 'My house; The injured were: is gone.' The tornado moved; Miss Lillian Bartel, Miss the house about 25 feet off its .TacqUcline Lewis and Mrs. foundation." Joseph Kutske, all of Green Wisnoski's home, which Hospital aids said they bought less than a ycar in good condition, was demolished. j Authorities said the shriek- "In the lightning flashes 1 jng funnel tossed huge semi- could see the funnel dancing trailer trucks around like Don Halron, a blowing leaves and drove a neighbor, said. ''I took my 20-foot wood family into the basement and then looked out one of the lit- jtlc windows. I saw the wall of beam into the Turn to P.age 18, Col. 1 In the first, four months of Washintrton Presi- Maryland Chief Asks Abolition of one house fall out and a in the air." Gerald Merchant and girl friend. Mary Ann were watching television at WflfpPfnQ rOSf the Marr.-h.-int home when the tornado .struck. Hover, Del. Gov. J. Crept Along Floor i Caleb Boggs today is vetoing Gerald said he and Mary-i bill which would make pub- Ann crept along the floor to lie lashing mandatory for time to prevent a strike by The -improvement half a million Steehvorkers employment and unemploy-lhis ycar unomployment has de'nt' asked con-the frnnl door and onto the convicted robbers and is call- !Jul-v l- ment wcre .what '-s dropped by over one million. grpss lnday to U. S. porch. He said when he look- ing for abolition of the whip- The industry-wide talks commcrce 1 a b o r parUc.ipalion in Pslabijshrn4nl ed around the roof of the post altogether. Drunken Drivers Since Jan. 1 97. Edwin A. Bredendick 39, 611 Western avenue, Nee- is one of the most nah. cause he was properly admit- ted as a prisoner of war. Tells of Wanderings The spokesman also said the statute of limitations may have run out on prosecution 98. Raymond T. for Rossmeisl's escape from 3g, Milwaukee. the POW camp in 1945. j Robert Berndt, 31, 633 S At. a German American: club here where he spent avenue, Oshkosh. place the dozen company ses-: ..u, week. Steehvorkers Union Presi- CommercV 3 said P' joint statement. night. Rossmeisl told of his since the 1940s. He said he had just return- ed from a Dutch East Indies plantation when he entered the German army in 1941. "1 was told that was the safest place to he said "I was working in Holland the nazis took over the country. T went into the army as a private." Rossmeisl said he was on Jaycees Salute Rural Youth Over Weekend Pictures and stories on the annual Junior Cham- ber of Commerce Rural Youth Day can be found on Pages A-4 and A-5 of to- night's Post-Crescent. On this special day set aside to honor farm young people, a parade and spe- cial activities occupy them. The theme of this year's parade was safety, both on and off the farm. (Story on Page B-10) the dent David .1. McDonald said 'demonstrate a rapirlly ac- yesterday that unemployment eclerating job recovery. important Employment rose to 65.012, 1.184.000 2.105.000 ty to be the first item on the more jobs than in April last agenda. year. This was the first official Unemployment declined to indication that shorter hours dipping by would be sought. from March. This is a decline winter months. ;issues in the talks. He said QOO. an increase of Summers ne wants employment securi- over March. This is I J s monthly job report attributed the April improvements to an a unusually large pickup in con-i struction and brisk hiring in hard goorl manufacturing to- gether with the spring expan- sion in agriculture. Turning Point relations with our The seasonally adjusted rate American neighbors." of unemployment in the labor Establishment of the billion force dropped to 5.3 per cent dollar bank was recommend- in April by comparison with cci by representatives of Un- American develop- llouse was and rain was He described this form of .pouring i rooms. For the United States to; Bill Howard, sports direc- rent to crime, join, Eisenhower said "willtor for radio station W.JPGJ The governor is sending his be a most significant step in said he was driving home message to the legislature the history of our economic when the wind bcSan lo this afternoon. He, himself, U the car. in Washington. "I saw this steel awning The house, voting 22-3, flying through the air right passed ihe senate's version Latin for the Howard said, of the bill April 29. "and I ducked under the The bill, provides for 20 to dashboard. It. missed. I tried 40 lashes for the first offense the rest of the way and no fewer than 30 for each 735-000 5 8 "per" cent, in March and 21 American republics after a per cent during the three month conference here driving starting ]ast Jan. 8. home but a tree fell and conviction thereafter. Strauss and Mitchell said-" The United States would in- blocked the street. I ran the The whippings, under the April one year after vest million. The Latin last four blocks to see the measure, would be adminis- thc turning point in the reces- American republics would put chimney on my house being tcrert in a prison yard to the rate of unemploy- up the remaining million, blown away." sion. Turn to Page 18. Col. 6 Robs Hotel of Nicolet's Water Route in cash Charlie House f o Make 900-Mile Canoe Trip New York .-P> A masked man holding four employes at bay with sawed-off shotgun. amount in ]lnusp win an undetermined checks. The money represented modern version of .lean Nico- weekcnd receipts of the big let May IP, when the adven- hotcl, at Eighth avenue and luresome outdoorsrnan and which the public would be ad- mitted. Passage of the bill was prompted by alarm over an increase in the crime, espe- cially armed robbery. 16 Die, 29 Hurt in Bus-Train Crash Mexico City A train and a packed passenger bus play ihe met the mm-hagoJ.nbeand ccllidcd cight milcs north .Mexico City tonight, killing, 18 persons and injuring 29 others. Most of the victims were white cil with sav, House's novel trip was sug- gested all-v Forty-fourth street feature expert starts a !KW- The robber, who had appar- mile canoe trip from Mon- ent.lv been hiding in the build- treal to V.enasha. ing." threatened two cleaning House will beach his canoe newspapermen men in a third-floor corridor. as diri in 1634 and made them sit quietly on as thp first whitc man to floor. comc ,nto is now A few minutes later the ho by the current and chjldrcn rcturnjng seaway rush whichi. Molher.s d ay'outings and himrirr'H Q nf TODAY'S INDEX CAW I (Twin AK M AT AT A All ;tel's cashier, Sylvester Ken- ny, and the hotel security of- ficer, John Connelly, went en route His journey hundreds of; fighting for; space on various ships ing the seaway run from Mon-: to the inland lakes. Historic Water visits. "'ho others can take the, as f.nd al ,he mcrnori, Smith easy way House sald Frl': This Handcrafted Oneida Indian Peace pipe known as A calumet soon to the Mohawks near Montreal by Charles House, Post-Crescent col- of the auditor. Here House receives the pipe from Mrs. Blanche McAllister for delivery during his forthcoming 800-mile canoe trip from Montreal to Menasha. Looking on is the Her. G. C. Brittain of St. Ann's Episcopal mission at Oneida. Both the Oneida and Mohawk member tribw of once powerful Iroquoia. marker standing in park on Menasha's Doty is- land where long ago stood the day cashier's office mam Kenny was hago carrying the money and worm checks in two bank bags. i1906- on the Ordering them tn Kit downl'te stone reads: beside the cleaners, the roh-! this spot in her took the in hii left landed the first white man ini hand and fled. Jean who! With the opening of the sea- way, a great deal of attention Is being paid to the speed and benefit of the new route, i It occurred to House that i there might considerably material and not a lit- tie historical value it some- it Cot. t X Weatherman Tomorrow over most of the state. Partly cloudy with chance ot ers Tuesday. for Utc 24-hour at a.m., high, Temperature at 11 Bawwifpter, flnaAawMt wtitd at M HalaM tatteft, .il at M ttgC 1 {NEWSPAPER! INEWSPAPERf   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication