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Appleton Post Crescent Newspaper Archive: May 7, 1959 - Page 1

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Publication: Appleton Post Crescent

Location: Appleton, Wisconsin

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   Appleton Post-Crescent (Newspaper) - May 7, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                               t u V APPLETON POST CRESCENT VOH.No.5a AmnOHJMB4AH4AENASHA, WIS., THUMOAY, MAY Asks Industry Fund if Catlin Law Repealed Draheim Proposes Legal Political Donations by Firms ASSOCIATED WIRE UftVICE Price Seven Bum. Madison The fight in the state legislature about labor union expenditures for politi- cal campaign purposes took a new turn today with a pro- posal by an industrial area representative to permit cor- porations to contribute funds for political campaigns also. Sen. W. A. Draheim of Nee- nah, Republican, offered an amendment in the state sen- ate to the assembly-approved bill which would repeal the Catlin law prohibiting the use of union dues money in elec- tion campaigns. Legalize Funds He would legalize the use of corporation as well as la- bor organization funds for! such purposes. Corporations' and cooperatives have been1 legally forbidden to use their! stockholder's money for po-j litical purposes for the lasti half century. The CaUin law! imposing the same rule for, labor organizations was, adopted four years ago. "If it is good for labor un-1 Set To Broadcast This Evening Washington Sec. of State Christian A. Herter plans a major bid for pub- lic support and understand- ing tonight on the eve of his trip to the east-west Ge- neva conference on Ger- many. Reports on preliminary drafts of a speech the sec- retary will deliver over major radio and television networks at 8 o'clock CDT indicate he will not spring any big surprises in Amer- ican policy. Herter is expected to stress what he regards as the reasonableness of U.S. plans for a peaceful solu- tion to the German crisis. He is prepared to say that the proposals to be pre- sented to the Soviets at the foreign ministers parley starting Monday will pro- vide a sound framework if the reds sincerely want to negotiate. At the same time, he is ready to renew assurances that ihe allies will not aban- don West Berlin to the com- munists just because Mos- cow demands that the west- ern powers get out. Bid for Support Herter's half-hour talk is of special importance be- cause- 1. It will mark his 20 Believed Held in Debris As New Building Collapses Predicts Strike if Steel Industry Does Not Meet Demands Pittsburgh Union Leader Stresses Determination New York The Steel-iT workers union today charged the steel industry ling the anti-trust laws ing involving a dozen sets of union negotiations with that' with violat-imany top industry producers.' As the negotiations entered1 labor relation laws and ask- their third day, they grew ed the government to investi- more tense primarily gate. Arthur J. Goldberg, the un- cause of yesterday's disclos-, ion's general counsel, said law1 ure the industry is already violations are involved in in- mapping strategy to deal withj idustry disclosures of plans it'a possible July 1 industry first (may invoke to deal with walkout. ions to use their money in po-, major appearance before   wno had Contract Goal Democratic leaders regard around President Eistnhow- The J L talks had brok- niousing as an lssue on which er's farm in a baby-blue elec- golf cart. There's a cigar in the Britisher's The .T L talks had tarok 'and subsidiaries under a news con- boy nat Denies He Knew Payoffs Made Says Hm Was Ignorant Of Extortion Slayer of Wife Held to be Insane circuit at the request of Milwaukee earljer whjrlyhird fUghl> obviously enjoyed lhe trip. Churchill clutched his gold- to they might well win a test with Eisenhower and are eag- in LUC jDiiuauiri a t SStftiS U- terms, said there ference the leadership wants picture Eisenhower driving are too "lo follow the _ usual course the smaU carl _ and ,t sag. j _ 4 dent- s _ .1 L industrial President rejaJmittee on "We are St. Louis A court jury ruled last nightlcounty. thai Charles E. Monlague kill-, Under lhe bill, funds ed his wife but was innocent1 service the debt would of murder because he was, and is, insane. _ _ _ The verdict requires that highway fund after aids to lo- now- Monlague be confined to are paid. A fiscal nole Vlce President George sonabie timp hp nn stale's maximum security'on the estimaled aboul S18 Flacus said the time, h That was the picture yesler- menial hospilal al Fulton. The million a year would be avail- seeks lo continue separate ,h_._ ,.p _, CCGSSary dav afternoon as the 84-year- 34-year-old laboratory techni-'able. makmg il possible lo conlracls lo fit local situa- old former prime minister of cian was returned to" a coun-borrow about million. tions. L iTa-lntmn r Britain and nis hosl The J L talks resumed Ihe legislation up for action the Eisenhower acres al lhe attitude of the tysburg, Pa., under a Crews Rush Rescue Work In New York Westbury, N.Y. (m A large industrial building being erected by of workers collapsed with an ear-shatter- ing roar shortly before 11 a.m. today. At least one man was killed, a number injured and an estimated 20 trapped In wreckage. Hundreds of rescue workers rushed to the scene and tore at the mounds of twisted steel girders and splintered plank- ing with bare hands in an ef- fort to free trapped laborers. For a time shrieks and cries arose from the heap of rubble, lying on the floor of the one- story building. Giant cranes also were sped to the sile to hoist heavier segments and permit rescue teams to crawl underneath. Ambulances roared away at frequent intervals with injur- ed. Eight or more were known to be in hospitals. The building was under con- struction at the Westbury In- dustrial park about 30 miles cast of New York City on Long Island. The steel frame- work had been erected and roofing and brick finishing work were under way. The structure, 200 feel long and 150 feet wide, was to house an electronics firm. Girder Gives Way A steel girder in the roof was believed to have given causing the avalanche of steel and wood to cascade downward. As many as 100 workmen were believed to have been on the job, some on the roof. When the crash came with little or no warning, there was a wild scramble for life. Some escaped. One group of 15 men mmm f Washington The busi- ness manager of the Ameri- had left the building an in- stant before the collapse. Al Long of l.slip Terrace, at can Weekly insislcd today he work on a nearby building, never asked for details this description: "All I saw was men chauffeur, the smiling rackets committee says passenger, smilingjwere extortion payments. 3[ whjp over lhe gravel lo a ty jail cell, but .ludge William Duffey told newsmen a E. Buder musl commit which would amend tllls morning wilh this prob- run- ning out from under the thing as it fell. Some made it but most didn't. The entire roof just fell over." Another witness. Verge Ab- aliello of Westbury, also i slightly soiled while job given newspaper Sunday supple-Islanding nearby, said: rnent, leslificd that at the! "I heard a tremendous roar Then off they weni, through time he didn't regard the'anfl turned around. There a swath c-ul m the tall grass, thick smoke rising up like the Churchillian bulk as they business matters for the no willmg to wa.t 3 whj over lhe ravel boy hat a b.oad bnmmed, _____ _ money as an improper pay- to the hospital within 10 days. After delibcrat-ng only constitution to raise the lom unsolved and put aside now in the as-.for furtber discussion later. ,irllt_ hot sun. onl., a noarbv road while newsmcn Qn h to assure labor peace. blazing {Q k I heard a guy reasonable time, Rayburn minutes, the all-male jury nil- sembly rules committee and Bot" the induslry and union _( ed Monlague innocent of the would be introduced soon 'have been trying to play down saia> preuy soon fir.st degree murder charge This measure, he said, was the possibility of a slrike in "for lhe sole reason that he also drawn al lhe request of i talking wilh reporters during insane al lhe lime of the Milwaukee counly. 'lhe preliminary slecl bargain- commission of the crime and he has not permanently re-1 covered Montague showed no emotion when the was read The body of Ruth Ann Montague, 34-year-old mother of Iw o, as found in her car on Jan 7 She had been slran- glod and her body had been mutilated. The car was park- ed in front of a house where Mrs. Monlague had atlended a sorority party the previous i night. 3 Fishermen Believed Drowned as Boot Sinks Twister Smashes Barn Near Sfiiocfon Hunt Origin of Fire The first .stop a big cal-'ing testimony tie barn. There hp Wefe !mproper- an aerial inspection of lhe his- nresident told Heads Union Local tone Gettysburg battlefield "They're of N'po Gravurc cattle also have marine Battlefield switched lo a corps helicopter for a bomb, scream." But, he said that since hear-j There was no fire, and Ab- given to the batiello apparently mistook where 1863 Un'on and Con" federale forces engaged in one of lhe classic conflicts of Abilene, Texas Fire- all time. The Eisenhower es- men sought today the cause of tate is at lhe edge of lhe bal- a fire which did an cslimaled tie site. million damage last night H was by helicopter lhal as it destroyed a department the president and Sir Winston some belipves tne comPnny. Weohawk- dust for smoke. _ iQKeS Life store, Thornton's in Itself. A brisk wind hampered the efforts of firemen to control tile blaze, burned out of A "baby" tornado flattened ondinR a brief spell of hot and control more than three hours a barn on the farm of Mrs humid weather. after a night watchman dis- Drunken Drivers Since Jan. 1 nurse cows. These (Black the 54 a paymentV Portaw A 68-year- Angu.s) don t gne enough Io Harold Gross olri Baraboo man shot and milk" eoinicted labor extortionist hls wlfe and thcn kijl- Jhey rode to another barn, to assurp delivery of the ed himself Wednesday night, lor a few mm- American Weekly to the N'ew Columbia County Sheriff Wal- n swuohed to a Y 0 rk American. tcr said. open automobile with Qross now a toainstr-rs un- Geopfert idenlified lhe vic- a fringed canopy. A secret ,on ,oca, pl-CMrtfM1'L m Miami Hms as Ernest Wcndt and his service agenl look over the Thp lc a wife, Dora, also 68 The shoot- chauffeunng chore from Eis- enhower. prmting company is a roneern lnR on the farm of Matilda Gehnng northeast of Shiocton. about p m. Wed- Her son, Ralph, farm across the road, said he Three saw lhp 1ornarin (.omc out of today was 51 degrees. Munising. Mich.- fishcrmen were presumed a uoodlot. drowned in l.ake Superior and miss hls WodncsflPy after their boat ,m n b> 20 feel before sank in a ram squall smnshirg into lhe barn The High temeralure ll on lhe upper 35. William Oehlke, was 82. but the mercury drop- of the 4-story buildup. route 2 Weyauweua ped 42 degrees to a low of 40 All available fire equipment i overnight. and firemen from Abilene and The lemperature at 11 a m nearby Dyess Air Force base route 2, Hilbert. Richard Handier, 49, Plans Being Made 58, For Laying Cable From Hawaii to Japan fought the flames. (Story on Page A-14.) Authorities identified the i trees in the men as (Mnrence DCS. lard ins. 69. his son 36. arid Hp cstimatod damage Louis Powell. 64. all of Munis- abou, 000 The, harn inc Their bodies were not ered. at Thrifty Values, Helpful Hints On Food Pages Cities area home- makers can plan new menus and their weekly shopping effective- ly when they use the week- ly Post-Crescent food pag- es Valuable tips ar? offer- ed on food preparation, recipes and suggestions for dressing up the table. Grocery advertisements enable the housewife to plan her menu without leaving her easy chair in an economical and time- saving way. If you haven't made use of the Post- Crescent food pages forp. give them a try to- night. used for .storing equipment and produce. A .shed on lhe nearby Rus- sell Johnson farm was" dam- aged when thp tonitido twist- ed it around on its foundation. There were no injuries. The Fox Cities area today shared the cool blast of air that flooded into the midwest. Twining in Hospital For Medical Tests Washington Gen Na- than F. Twining, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, is in Walter Reed hospital for a se- ries of medical tests because recent chest X-rays indicated they were advisable. The Pentagon said today the 61-year-old air general took his annual physical ex- amination last week. This examination included the X- rays which "indicated rp- for further diag- nosis and a Mate said. Toyko i.fi (States may be ;ihle to see (live telecast of Crown "lAkihito'.s coronation as em- iperor of Japan if it takes place after the mid-1960s. Telephone users on the American mainland will pick up their phone six or years from now. di.il 'lokyo and hear their part> loud and clear. These prospects were open- ed up loday. by the announce- ment that the Jfipan Weekly's O'Donnell to Head makmg pacif jc Air Forces handles various types of print- thelr jon-m-law and daugh- m addition to turning lner- Mr- cand Mrs- Clayton out Sunday supplements. Pearson of lhe lown of Cale- I Rob e r I F. Kennedy, lhe "ear here. icommnu-e counsel, asked Mrs. Wendt was tak.ng car. Fonlana strrnly whether Fon- of her daughler who was ill. tana was testifying as he did lhe Lniled Because "you can he senl to a Ihe penitentiary for that kind of paymei "You ;mrl the other officers1 Washington Assign (of American Weekly) knew ment of Lt. Gen. Emmett O'- what il Kennedy Oonnell to bo commander in charged chief of the Pacific air forces "I did not Fontana was announced today by the iiiMMoH He made no direct While House reference to Kennedy's re- Al the same lime, President rm.rks about the penitentiary. Ki-enhowcr nominated O'Don- Tell.s of Payments air force deputy John J. I'.ndiilo, American fluef of staff for personnel former business for promotion to the rank of Kadio and Cable company and m.-.nager, testified that the full general. The nomination is the American Telephone and payments of were initi- sub.icct to senate confirma- 'I'elegraph company vvill start ated under Ins admmistralion, t'on. _____________________ layinu the world's longest suti- and thai he had regarded them telephone as improper but necessary ifirst between Japan and Ha- tribute for Inhor peace Padu- year. lo now is business manager ot The cable, more than tlu- Krie (Pa) Times and jmiles long, will tie in to the News .existing llawaii-U. S. cable. said he authorized (Calls can then travel by line the payment to Neo Gra- Knnx Cmmty Jail Sam Burnett and John Conley owt of their cell they were locked by Ray Caughorn who made his seventh prison break in 17 A locksmith freed the guards about two hours aftar CMftwrn fled the Knoxville, Tenn.. jail. -PO Gravure re-1 would [across the United States andiviirf> after jvia the 2.200-mile transatlan- prrtofj (-ne tie cable to Kurope. The result ,o assure, delivery w.ll be a 3-contment system of (ho Weekly to the that will not be subject to he American, atmospheric disturbances that _ _.j interrupt radiotelephone facil-j Fonlana said lhat ities. Cost, of the project is esU- business manager ot American Weekly In 1959, he maiwi at continued the paymenU is to be completed 1fe said or 1SW6 was "to project jrtill ap- 1 livery of American by the U. S. Federal Communications Commission to the New. York Journal and regarded the and the Japanese Ministry ot'fwyments then iiwss expenst." Female Type Weather, to Predict I Wisconsin Fair and cool tonight with frost like- ly over the north and west portions and scattered frost elsewhere. Partly cloudy and cool Friday. Appteton Tempera- tures for the 24-hour period ending at 9 high, 8Z, low, 40. Temperature at 11 a.m., 51. Sonthwert wind at htmr. Pracipk tat ton ot .it M incH WCVIMt Vl fitches. Weather C 11. Sun seta at p.m., PS FrMiy M a.m.} M4V moon at NEWSPAPER!   

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