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Appleton Post Crescent: Saturday, March 21, 1959 - Page 1

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   Post Crescent, The (Newspaper) - March 21, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                             APPLETON POST CRESCENT VOL. L No. 19 26 A, B APPUTON-NEENAH-MENASHA, WIS., SATUtDAY, MAtCH 21, 1959 ASSOCIATED WOW UMVICS Price Seven Cents Ike and Macmillan x Agree on Formula For Summit Talks Send Draft of Plan to Allies For Their Views Getty'sbucf, ident Eisenhower and British Minister Harold Mac- millan agreed today on a formula for offering to So- viet Premier Nikita Khrush- chev the prospect of a sum- mit conference later this year. A proposed draft of the summit meeting plan was dis- patched immediately to the French and German govern- ments and the other NATO al- lies for their reaction. The formula, when fully ap- proved, will be included in a new note to Moscow on nego- tiations over the Berlin crisis and German problems gen- erally. The western powers had already agreed to pro- pose a foreign ministers meeting at Geneva beginning May 11 and hold out at least the possibility of a fol- lowup summit conference. Full Agreement Today's agreement was an- nounced by U. S. and British press officers immediately after it was reached. Presi- d e n t i a 1 Press Secretary James C. Hagerty, with Bri- tish spokesman Peter Hope at his elbow, reported to news- men on the progress of the Eisenhower Macmillan dis- cussions at Camp David in these words: "Both Hope and I can say that there is -complete agree- ment between our two govern- ments that we are looking to negotiations as a means of settling controversies in Europe, that we have agreed on the general line on which we think the reply to the Sov- iet note dealing with the mat ter of a summit meeting should be formulated. "We are now communicat Ing our proposals to the French and German govern ment and to our NATO allies for their consideration." The two leaders opened thi second day of their Camp Da vid conference, on a wooded ridge in the nearby Maryland mountains, at a.m. Eisenhower and Macmillan with their regular advisers were joined by Sir Anthony Rumbold, an assistant under- secretary of the British for- eign of in charge of Eu- ropean affairs and high lev- el east-west talks. Rumbold's pre'sence, along with regular counsellors such as acting Sec. of State Chris tian Herter and Foreign Sec Selwyn Lloyd, spotlighted the problem of working out some agreeable arrangement on he summit issue. Reef Economic '.hief Favors luxury Goods 'resident Raps iroup's Slash n Loan Fund Calls It Step Toward Isolating Country, Weakening Security Washington new flareup in the battle of the budget appeared in prospect oday as a result of President Eisenhower's strong denunci ation of a house committee's und cutting. "Irresponsible Eis enhower said yesterday after he house appropriations com mittee rejected his request for !225 million in supplementary money for the developmen' can fund. In a statement issued from Moscow A stauncl advocate of more washinj machines, refrigerators and jther consumer luxuries fo the Russian people is the So iet Union's new top econom c planner. Deputy Premier Alexei Ko Kosygin Kuzmitt India Reports Strugg es in Tibet Capit Father Finds Missing Child Oil City, all night search for a missing 8 year-old girl ended happily a dawn today when her fathe found her trudging along a road toward home. Norman Stevenson whisked his daughter Bonnie in his au- to to their Oil City home for B joyous reunion with her dis- traught mother, a hot bath and a warm bed. Bonnie told her father she had become separated from her two 11 and a grade school bas- ketball game last night at Cranberry, about three miles south of their northwestern Pennsylvania community. Second Detroit Group Plans Alaska Trek sygin, 55, an expert on bus ness management, takes ove from Deputy Premier Josep Kuzmin, whose backgroun leans more to heavy industry and agriculture. The significance behind the shakeup was not immediately clear, for the 49-yeai- old Kuzmin was considered close to Premier Khrushchev. It could mean that Khrushchev is still facing some opposition to his drastic economic changes'. Diplomats suggested that lis Camp David, Md., head quarter, Eisenhower said: The action today if not reversed will represent a long step backward toward isolating our country and weakening our national secur- ity." Other Reductions Speaking in unusually strong terms, Eisenhower said the loan fund "must have ad- ditional funds now." The fund finances loans to underdevel- oped areas in connection with the foreign aid program. The committee's rejection of the fund request highlight- ed a day of budget slashing. The house itself cut more than million from propos- ed funds to finance the treas- ury and post office depart- ments during th 1960 fiscal year beginning next July 1. Without controversy and by voice vote, the house passed and sent to the senate a mon- ey bill appropriating 000 to the treasury, 000 to the post office and SI, to the tax court. Floor Fight Seen These sums are 000 less than the post office requested, less than the treasury asked but the same amount sought by the tax court. Passage of the bill cleared the way for a house vote and an almost certain floor fight next week on an omnibus ap- propriation bill which had contained Eisenhower's loan fund request. Mrs. Duncan Sentenced to Gas Chamber Dalai Lama Disappears After Chinese Reds Order Him to Peiping daughter-in-law. A jury, which _.r____ __ Kuzmin, though down-graded in rank, may still have one of the big jobs in the Soviet Un- ion's new 7-year plan. The bill now earmarks to finance rniscel AT Death in the Gas Chamber was the sentence Mrs. Elizabeth Duncan, convicted earlier of first degree murder for arranging the slaying of her son's wife, heard as she stared at the Ventura, Calif., jury. At the left is her attorney, S. Ward Sullivan, and at the extreme right is her son, Frank Duncan. He testified for his mother during the trial. Mrs. Duncan's reac- tion? She called the death decree, "A rotten deal." Air Force Hopes to Recover Missile Cone Launches ICBM Warhead From Cape Canaveral BY JACK KING Cape Canaveral, Fla. The air force hurled a futurist- ic ICBM warhead far out over the Atlantic aboard a fiery tiny flash of light in rapid succession indicated that the second stage of the 80-foo launching vehicle had ignite  cochairman of the'ed to have achieved its test ...linint finanr-0 onmmittee and Objective inat IS, p in the Midde East. 'We shall fight this new tax withholding system open-lone of the proposal's strong- ed today with a blast from theiest opponents, filed a petition state Republican party. As the party took the lead successful flight. A fleet of search ships and in the senate last week. It1 planes waited in rendezvous _ j in lUc Senate wtrciv. AL vYati-tu. As the party took the lead wag signed by 994 members off Ascension island gave the senate-house corn- in attacking the Democratic Q{ Local 2365g Qf the wjrc miles to the southeast ready mittee some unorthodox testi- nrnnnsal. the state chamber T <._ mnnv TViriav r inc- T-I in. nepuuiic-au legislators another group of 125 Detroit, uncertain how families which plan to leave j position they can for Alaska in June said today, 8 a.nPt proposal_ he isn't discouraged by aiffi-, b in their districts tak- culties encountered by tne .__ I UI VI L11C LW .JUM... proposal, the state chamber ,Workcrs Federal Labor Un-to recover the elusive cone of commerce and other busi-. gnd asRed hjm tQ oppose after it splashed into the sea. ness groups prepared to jomi rirnnneal A hrieht Duff and then a the proposal. Jobs Bigger Problem Than Inflotionf Economist Says Washington Harvard Economist Sumner Slichter mony Friday. The committee is beginning an investigation into the prob- first caravan now en route. "We warned them about overloading and about leav- ing this time of year." said Harry Tacina, a 36-year-old ing political soundings. Gov. Gaylord Nelson has embraced the withholding pro- posal as one of his adminis- tration's main bills. The mea- sure was introduced Thurs- day in the Democratic-con- plan the June 22 journey. Besf of America's Pasf Tells of Piracy Did you know that a former British major turn- ed pirate was the only ad- venturer who made his vic- tims walk the plank? Did you know that the legendary Captain Kidd was financed by five peers of the British realm and one New Yorker? Did you know that a de- pression in the colonies touched off the first rum- running? For the answers to these and other questions, read the colorful account of how legalised plunder under wartime conditions became wholesale and cutthroat piracy. It's in today's American heritage episode on page A-14. On Page B-l is a full-col- or picture 01 the Kimberly Papermakeri, who lost an opening heart-break- er in the Madison tourney, a win- ning streak. They also lost the consolation found automotive sales manager ine uen who quit his job recently to assembly. 99. Bargain Possible Republican leaders in both houses said it is premature to say what position Republi- can lawmakers will take on the bill. There is some speculation, senate Republicans m i g h t; strike some kind of bargain; with the Democrats if thej withholding proposal could be held off until tax studies are completed this fall. The Republican party's of- ficial weekly publication la- bled the withholding proposal an attempt by Nelson "to bail ,out his badly foundering ad- ministration." "Sleeping Pill" The "windfall" the system would provide during its first year of operation, the publi- cation said, "is actually a 'sleeping pill' by which Gov. Nelson hopes to put the peo- ple of Wisconsin to sleep un- after the 1960 elections." Sen. Robert Travis, R- Platteville, GOP floorleador, said the bill should be kill- ed. He was careful to say that he could not speak for all senate Republicans. Trav- is, former owner of a dry', in battle against the new commu- nist imperialism using the same weapons by which we previously defeated western Nasser told thousands of cheering Syrians yesterday. "With Allah's help we shall destroy communism and subordination by those same weapons of unity, faith and Arab nationalism." Spurns "Protection" The president of the United Arab Republic said he did not Soviet Premier Khrushchev's protection of Arab communists. "If Khrushchev he de- fends communism as a prin- ciple, we cell him we do not re- gard this defense as a prin- ciple but as interfering in our affairs. "We reject subordination (playing a junior role to a for- eign power) and colonialism because we fought hard and gave many sacrifices and Himalaya! have been grow ing since last summer when Khampa tribesmen of eastern, Tibet slipped out of Lhasa to launch a guerrilla campaign against the Chinese commu- nists from mountain lem of how to achieve econom- ic growth without inflation. Slichter, however, called un- employment a bigger national! problem than inflation. He said with joblessness still at recession levels the govern- ment should plan a billion End Her Suffering dollar deficit for the next fis- cal year to create 3obs. Republicans questioned his martyrs for our independence we shall defend it to the last drop of our blood." 90-Year-Old Man Kills Wife, 89, to Philadelphia "Her suffering was just too much statement that creeping for me to bear. So last night I prayed all tion is "by no means as disas- night. "i asked trous" as some contend. God what to The Democrats, many of do." whom put most of the blame That, said for rising prices on big Detective Sgt. ness, got their jolt when Slich- John J. Mc- jler said wage demands of pow- Bride, was the erful unions are the foremost explanat i o n cause of higher living costs. Would End Tariffs 90 year old George Hope Perhaps the biggest jolt gave yester- Hope came when Slichter advocated j day after the fatal shooting of that all tariffs and import quo-i his wife Ada, 89 as she las be abolished over a 10-year, slept m their North Philadel- willing to do P McBrlSe'said Hope planned ,u yfh H 1 kill himself also, but his that, then don t complain from hjs about rising prices." trembling hands. He defended his proposal on grounds tariff cutting would' all over Hope told ne said, expose U S. industry Mrs. Agda Deshant. a nc.gh- I to more competition, stiffen house to its resistance to AP Large-Scale Fighting for the last three days, ing to report! in India, located on this map of Lhasa. holds just south and east of the capital. The revolt of the Khampas, a historically troublesome tribe, has placed the Dalai Lama in a ticklish position. Conflicting Reports Some refugees claim tht Khampas have a wide follow- ing and are leading a popular uprising against the Chinese, Others say the tribesmen, who claim to be fighting in the name of the Dalai Lama, speak only for themselves. The Dalai Lama, is por- trayed here as torn by pleas of the Khampas for protection and demands of the overlords that he crack down on the rebellious tribesmen. The young ruler, worship- ped by Tibetans as the rein- carnation of Buddha, has sat tight. This has led to specula- tion that the communist! might attempt to move nim- by force or Peiping. wage demands and greater efficiency. AP Wallace "Mad Bear" Anderson of the Tuscarora tribe, acts as spokesman for a band of ir0quois and Western Indians at the interior department in Washington, D. C., where they tried to place Glenn Emmons, Indian affairs commissioner, under "citizen arrest." Emmons did not appear. His secretary, Mrs. Evelyn Massey, foreground held the Indians at bay as police stood by. The Indians iaid they At right is Donald "Falling Arrow" Richmond, nessmen and farmers in his Hogansburg N Y Brig Gen. Herbert Holdridfce, center, retired officer WflES B- from Sherman Oaks, Calif, accompanied the excessive promote what had happened. Hope told police his wife ihad been in poor health for "No single step that the gov- 1Q years ernment could take would j make such an important con- QxO Grand National tribution toward strengthen- ing the American economy I Steeplechase and toward the achievement of' rapid growth with stability of! Aintree, England -W- Oxo an 8-1 shot won the 113th Grand National steeplechase today. Wyndburgh finished second, and the favored Mr. What was third. The crowd was slim by normal stan- Capetowit, South dards, and the royal family he said. Whale Refinery Ship Loset 2 Sailors in Gale British whale refinery ship Balaena, arriving today erpool to Aintree were _ only from Antarctic, reported was absent. Trains from Liv- two crewmen in the whaling fleet seas. _r___ half full and the crowd was British1 estimated at about lost in instead of the throngs of '000 in somt years. Sing Out Hosannas! Spring Has Arrived Wisconsin Fair and warmer Sunday with a high expected in mid-30s. Windy and cold tonight with occa- sional snow flurries. Low expected, about 10. Applcton Temper a- tures during the 24-hour pe- riod ending at 9 a.m. to- day: High, 44; low, 18. Tem- perature at 10 a.m. today, 19. Wind out of northwest at 14 miles an hour. Snow on ground, 18 inches. Barome- ter at 30.20 inches. Weath- er map on page A-9. Sun sets at p.m., ris- es Sunday at a.m.; moon sets Sunday at a.m. Prominent star is Reg- ulus. Visible Ve- nus, Mars, Jupiter Md urn. .'SPAPERf   

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