Appleton Post Crescent, March 19, 1959

Appleton Post Crescent

March 19, 1959

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Issue date: Thursday, March 19, 1959

Pages available: 69

Previous edition: Wednesday, March 18, 1959

Next edition: Friday, March 20, 1959

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Publication name: Appleton Post Crescent

Location: Appleton, Wisconsin

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Post Crescent, The (Newspaper) - March 19, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin APPLETON POST CRESCENT VOL. L No. 17 62 Pages and 12 Pago Tabloid APPLETON-NEENAH-MENASHA, wis., THUISDAY, MARCH ASSOCIATED FRBM wnu SERVICB Price Seven Cents Khrushchev Wants West to Offer Own Way to Talks Ideas on Germany Suggests Meeting May 11 to Discuss Entire Issue; Still In Favor of Summit Session BY HABOKJD K. MILES Nikita Khrushchev challenged the west today to up with concrete ideas for a summit conference to blunt the threat of war over Berlin and Ger- many. The Soviet Union is ready, he asserted. Khrushchev said the Soviet Union is willing to meet with the west May 11 to discuss problems of West Berlin and a German treaty. Wants Peace Treaty He again advanced the So- viet idea that a conference in- clude all the 28 nations that fought Hitler in. World war II. This proposal has been reject- ed by western powers. Khrushchev issued a state- ment evidently designed as his response to President Eisen- hower's address last Monday. He stuck to his previous con- tention that the broad meet- ing he proposed consider a German peace treaty but add- ed significantly that if the west has proposals "any we are reasonable willing to consider them along with our own." He said the meeting should aim to conclude a peace treaty with Germany and "settle pressing problems." The Soviet leader said he understood the western pow- ers have proposed that a con of foreign ministers open May 11 and his govern- ment is ready to accept. "I am convinced there wil be meetings of both the for eign ministers and heads of he continued. For two hours Khrushchev answered questions from more than 300 correspondents in Sverdlovsky hall of the Kremlin. He praised as reasonable President Eisenhower's re- marks Monday on negotia- tions, jibed at West German Chancellor Adenauer's posi- Macmillan on Turn to Page IS, Col. 1 Nuclear Explosions Over Atmosphere Reported Set Off to Form Shield to Rettrict Missiles BT Washington nuclear bombs exploded, by the United States beyond the earth's atmosphere formed an elec- tronic sheet that circled most of the world. A responsible official outside the defense department said the tests at tremendous altitude were an effort to spread a shield through which missiles could not fly. Defense department officials confirmed last night that the blasts had been set off secretly last September, for both mili- tary and scientific test purposes. But they declined to discuss the military angles. Other sources reported, however, that the test explored the possibility of generating at an altitude of about 300 miles a diffusion of neutrons which would offset the nuclear reac- tion in missile warheads. Just how the electronic shield could halt missile or keep it from exploding was not explained. Fired From Ships With President Expected to Work For More Flexible Policy for Allies Washington OB British Prime Minister Harold Mac- millan arrives today for Ber- lin strategy talks with Presi- dent Eisenhower. He is ex pected to urge Eisenhower to join him in working out more flexible western policies for forthcoming negotiations with Russia. The two men will go into their weekend of conferences firmly agreed on the need to resist Soviet threats and pres sures aimed at forcing the estern powers out of Berlin But they are clearly divided on a number of other issues involved in preparing for ne gotiations with Russia. Ike Consults Aides Before heading to Washing ton from Ottawa, Macmillan expressed connfidence his vis its to the two capitals "wil serve to consolidate and con firm the united will of the western world." Eisenhower called actini Sec. of State Christian Herte and other adviser to the White House for discus sion of the Berlin situation in preparation for Macmillan' arrival. The actual talks between the two men will get unde way tomorrow at Camp Dav id, Md., a secluded mountai retreat about 65 miles from Washington. Although a joint statemen early next week may report generally on their talks, de tailed practical results of thei work may not be disclosed o: ficially until the foreign min isters of the United States Britain, France and Russi meet this spring. Such a meet ing is now being worked out. Airport Aid Bill Vote Due Today Washington Hous Democrats and Republican squared off today for anothe GOP Starts Defense On Withholding Plan The shots were fired from naval craft in the south Atlan- tic late in than a month before the United States started a one- year suspension tests pending of nuclear negotiations with Russia on halting all such testing. Deputy Sec. of Defense Donald Quarles and Dr. Her- bert York, director of Pen- tagon research, gave some details of the test shots after newsmen had learned of them from other sources. They said the explosions were of very low yield in ra- diation and would not reveal the altitude at which the tests Turn to Page 10, Col. 1 budget battle likely to hav repercussions in next year' election campaigns. It's over a Democratic backed airport aid bill whic calls for spending millio: more than President Eisen hower has recommended. Indications were that the f nal vote today would fin the Democrats on top. Republicans are backing bill following the president' recommendations and provic ing for a 4-year outlay of millions for airport develop ment. Governor Gives More Tax Details IY JOHN WYNGAARD Staff Writer in ontrol of the state senate oday were preparing their efenses against the Demo- ratic administration drive or an income tax withhold- ing plan. Gov. Gaylord Nel- on is making public addi- ional details of the opera- tion of his proposed wage and salary check tax deduc- tion system. Unconfirmed but reliable say Republicans of the senate in a first, private est vote on the withholding issue Wednesday showed 19 out of 20 planning to vote.'. against the central financial strategy of the Democratic governor and his legislative lieutenants. The 20th mem- was described as uncer- tain about his attitude. If such a line-up continues, Nelson will be defeated al- though it is expected his plan will breeze through the Dem- ocratic controlled assembly comfortably. 20 Per Cent The governor Wednesday formally asked the legislative finance committee to intro- duce his bill and offered fur- ther details of its operation. He said he wants it effective July 1, if it can be passed quickly enough, or if not, on Sept. 1. He asked that withholding for the balance of 1950 be at :he rate of 20 per cent of tha federal withholding for wages and salaries, which would at an artificially high rate, permitting most taxpayers to This Aerial View Shows 21 cars of a 94-car Chicago and North Western freight train scattered across tracks after a broken rail caused a derailment Wed- nesday afternoon near Allenville, 8 miles northwest of Oshkosh. No crewmen were injured, although three units of the 4-unit diesel engine left the rails. Fott-Cretcent Atrlil by Bklpk The same crew was derailed from the spot six years ago and snowbound 3 miles away at Larsen March 5 and 6. The northbound train consisted of 81 loaded cars and 13 empties. Most of the cars lying across the tracks were coal and tank cars. The engine unit is at the top of the picture. (Story on Page D 1.) Crazed Kidnaper of 4 Sought By Police in West Virginia Mother, 3 Children Held in Quest for Vengeance on Foe Charleston, W. read note pen. ned by the former convict. "I don't want money. I want vengeance.' Helicopters droned over creeks and valleys of southern lice threw desperation re- sources into the search today for a crazed former convict who kidnapped a mother and three children. He threatened to torture and kill them un- less the governor personal enemy from the state penitentiary so he could kill him. Gov. Cecil H. Underwood flew to Washington today, as previously planned, to meet with federal highway officials. He declined comment, saying the casekwas in good hands with the'state police in charge and that they had full authori- ty to act. "Only you have the power Nasser Reported to Be Seeking Support In Fight With Kassem Damascus, Syria (JPi President Gamal Abdel Nas- ser today appeared seeking the support of Lebanon in his them un-west Virginia while 75 state released a troopers pressed a ground IAbdel to save them from certain fight against Iraqi Premier Karim Kassem and Arab communists. The United Arab Republic leader and Lebanese Presi- ident Fuad Chehab have 1 agreed to meet against Turn to Page 15, Col. 1 Propose Group On Revision of Consfifufion Madison Five crats senators proposed to- day that the legislature cre- ate a governor's commission on constitutional revision. The senators Lynn Stal- baum of Racine, Horace Wil- kie of Madison, and Henry Maier, William Moser and Richard Zaborski, all of Mil- waukee said 21 proposed j amendments introduced in this session indicate a grow- ing need for an overall study of the constitution. "These amendments should best be considered as a group and not the sen- ators said hi a statement, adding: "Wisconsin has not had a general study or revision of its constitution since 1848. The requirements of our mod- A 7-year-old boy was killed; ern society make it only rea- instantly about p.m. Wed-jsonable that we should re- when 7-Year-Old Boy Killed by Auto Arnold St. Outagamie County's 9th 1959 Fatality to County Trunk; T, 4 mile north of Dale. No Soviet Submarines sighted in Pacific old St. Ger- 3 _ nold St. Ger-j maine, who) W) A navy anti- was boardingi submarine commander re- with Mr. and I ports no Russian submarines Mrs. Fay But-ihave been spotted in the Pa- St. Germaine ler, route recently. background of fresh stirrings Hortonville. He was the sonj "We haven't run across any in the Middle East growing of Mr. and Mrs. Robert St. Soviet subs Capt. Er- r tv, JfiGermaine, Milwaukee. It was nest H. Dunlap told a group out of the leftward swing of Outagamie county i of editors and publishers Wed- Starcher the Iraqi government. The Lebanese government pedestrian fatality of 1959 and the ninth traffic death. nesday. has kept out of the personal; Driver of the car, Earl De i Cl..fL fhaf Vine Vin-: oo 1101 V JlOfT jlUSfl rUflO search .or Richard Arlenjfeud that has developed be-jBruin, death, by granting my Three Small CMMrca, Tee Photo, and their mother, Mrs. Elma Baldwin, 29, photo, were captives today of a crazed gunman who terrorized the family of John H. Baldwin, SI, Charleston, W. Va. Baldwin and Capt W. R. Callaghan of the West Virginia state bottom photo, look at picture of Richard Payne, ti, former fenvfct sought hi the The children are, left to right, Kenneth, 10, I, m4 Danny, T. {NEWSPAPER! Rural Life Conference Reviewed The many problems con- fronting farmers in this mechanical age were dis- cussed at the National Catholic Rural Life con- ference in Freedom Wed- nesday. The good and bad aspects of farm mechani- zation, the value of coop- eratives and the attempts to educate farm youth to remain in the field of agri- culture are some of the items discussed. Today's Post Crescent carries a special report by Dave Apker, farm editor, on the conference. His re- port on the bright future of American Farmers can be found on page D-3. 38, 1121 N. Union de-i Payne, 23, who forcibly tookltween Nasser and Kassem, j street, told Outagamie Coun- the four at gunpoint lastjbut Chehab is known as a'ty Coroner Bernard H. Kemps night. i staunch anti-communist. One; that he was southbound on State police called Payne small clash was reported last County T at about. 60 miles an extremely dangerous men-'week between pro-Nasser Le- an hour, when the boy, walk- tal case. banese and communists dur-jing north with two compan- In the rambling, "-page ti- ing a demonstration follow-! jons, tried to cross the road, rade addressed to Underwood, 'jng the abortive rev( he named a convict, Burton Iraq. Junior Post, better known as1 Junior Starcher, whom Payne Takes Off in QuCSf knew when Payne was serv- ing time for armed robbery.j for Light Plane The note said: said the boy "froze" when he saw the oncoming auto. De Bruin applied his brakes, Turn to Page 15, Col. 5 Rinds, Gags Family 'My purpose is to kill and Wiley Proposes Dairy Bill Mul- len took off today from the Research at to take the head of my worst 'Houston International airport with hopes of breaking the enemy, who is now out of reach. He is in the W.Va. pen itcntiary at Moundsville." ord for "To save the the note read, "I demand only the FBI work on this case Washington '.world non-stop rec-jtion to establish a dairy re- planes, 'search center at Madison, His first goal is Rome. If was proposed today by reaches there in good shapejScn. Alexander Wiley (R- he plans to try to go on Payne entered the home of Athens or Cairo in an attempt John H. Baldwin, 31, earlsr tobreak the record last night on the pretense of wanting to the telephone. Then he whipped out pis- tol-and threatened to kill the Turn to Pagt 13, Col. 2 for light planes set last year by Pat Boling on a flight from Manila to Pendteton, Ore. Tha distance from Houston "In this technological age the dairy industry pend more and more upon broad foundation of research to meet the challenges facing the industry and the needs of to to cosiniming I said. Buy Our Way Ouf Wisconsin Partly cloudy with slowly diminish- ing winds tonight. Becom- ing a little colder northwest portion but warmer extreme southeast. Friday cloudy to cloudy and colder most sections with chance of a few scattered showers or snow flurries. Low to- night from the 20s extreme northwest to 40 extreme southeast. High Friday in 30s north, 40s south. Appleton Temperatures for the 24 hour period end- ing at 9 o'clock: High 40, low 39 at midnight. Tem- perature at 11 o'clock Southwest wind at 14 mites per hour. Barometer inches. Weather map aft page Sun sets at p.m., He- es Friday at a.m.I moon PrMay el till a.m. PronwMiM the Twins. ;

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