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Appleton Post Crescent Newspaper Archive: March 7, 1959 - Page 1

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Publication: Appleton Post Crescent

Location: Appleton, Wisconsin

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   Post Crescent, The (Newspaper) - March 7, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                             APPLETON POST CRESCENT VOL. L No. 7 26 A, 8 APPLETON-NEENAH-MENASHA, WIS., SATURDAY. MARCH ASSOCIATKO PRESS WIRE SERVICE' Price Seven Cents Gov. Nelson Raps Ike for Not Facing Domestic Problems Puts Costs Before Cures, He Declares Milwaukee Gov. Gay- lord Nelson said today states can expect little federal help because the Eisenhower ad- ministration puts "costs be- fore cures when considering domestic problems." Speaking at the state prob- lems panel of the Midwest Democratic Conference, Nel- son said states have inherited larger percentage of young people are demanding the op- portunity to go to college and1 the additional students ex-j pected next year will be equiv- alent to the enrollment of two entirely new state colleges. Wisconsin needs avnew net- work of 4-lane limited access highways, Nelson said, be- cause the northern half of the state relies so heavily on tour- ist trade and the number of vehicles using state roads has steadily multiplied. He said the federal govern- ment will help materially on 450 miles of the new network, but the state's needs are much larger and each mile will cost to con- Felons Seize 4 as Hosf ages In Bay Sf of e Walpole, long-term prisoners holed up in the metal shop of the Massachusetts State prison today after seizing a deputy warden, two guards and the prison storekeeper as hos- tages. State police said the pris- oners included Martin Feeney, 43, of South Bos- ton, an escape artist who made his way to freedom two years ago from Nor- folk prison colony. The other prisoners were listed as Robert Howett, Russell Halliday, Robert Savage and Kenneth Abramson. Feeney acted as a spokes- man for the group and de- manded that Warden John A. Gavin come and talk with them. An alarm brought scores of state troopers from southern and central Mas- sachusetts barracks and the new prison which replaced the old state prison in Fox Cities Working Free of 12-Inch Snow immense problems that cover. than almost every area of govern-' ,u N e 1 s o n said "exhaustive T on Wisconsin's out federal budget committed recreational area de- U1C WM national defense and with an; mands greater effort in wet- Charlestown a few years administration that puts costs, d uisition protection ago was virtually surround- VioFnT'o wVion ed within an hour. One of the hostages was Deputy Warden Thompson. 'line these resources has al-j The guards' names were though our national govern- outstripped special! given as Murphy and Du- ment has skimmed the cream consPePrvation; before cures when consideringjf forests, fish and game man- domestic problems the states' >d watershed con. can expect little in the way of fl t f maintain. additional federal aids, even said. pret and the storekeeper as White. from most sources of tax re-, he said. Higher Prices, More People "The steady climb of prices has pushed costs of maintain- ing past state programs high- er and higher while the so- called population explosion has forced us to meet the needs of an ever expanding number of Nelson said. The state's new Democra- tic governor went to spell out problems Wisconsin faces Soviet Premier Khrushchev said he nad no infor. major areas in which "state.has dropped a hint that he mation to give. Poles, Czechs May Sign E. German Pact Shoveling Claims Another Victim; Most County Roads May be Opened by Tonight Life returned to near-nor-ibeth hospital was Reinhold pj mal today as the Fox Cities Tjedt( 62 3QO w Foster area dug itself out after the gtreet Tfa b d f d fa worst snowstorm in years but one Appleton man died of a a neighbor. heart attack about 6 p.m. Fri-1 A 12-inch blanket of snow day while shoveling snow in fen on the area Friday, the front of his house. Wisconsin Michigan Power Dead on arrival at St. Eliza- company weather station re. ported. Heavy blowing and drifting made matters worse in most areas, stalling cars, buses and trains. Street and highway crews, working through the night, cleared major thoroughfares, but many side streets and country roads remained block- ed by huge drifts. Crews Working Appleton Director of Public Works Edwin Duszynski re- ported that street crews went Boy at Helm at Time of Crash Steered Norwegian Tanker but Under Seaman's Guidance out at p.m. Friday and most of them were still on the New York A 15-year-jjob thjs morning. old boy was at the helm of the Norwegian tanker Jalanta, The only streets that remain blocked are those where drifts Leipzig East jGrotewohrs press cnief Kurt oslovakia to join Russia in action is absolutely invite Poland and Czech- sary." j "But every program costs! money, and that means tax! Nelson said, Khrushchev is due to ad- dress a labor conference treatv with j y this afternoon and leave Biowine hot and cold the'by train this evening for East "We in the state have a long ebullent ieader let'leakj Berlin, where an official re- way to go in assuring suggestion that this may1cePtlon ls scheduled for 10 p. citizens efficient and economy be his next maneuver in hiSim- ic state govern- lpressure campaign ment offering full value west. every tax dollar spent. The programs I have outlined for the next few years are vital, L 111 against! There was speculation that 'Khrushchev would remain in Berlin over the weekend, es- The Russians are demand- ing an all-German treaty lf Gomulka and Nov" that would, in effect, simony show and can be ignored only if two Germanys to count-_ _ _ wish to ignore the destiny of cr western proposals for re- 1 Tea MOne, ramOUS our children and the future of unification of the country. and Dance Man our society." Nelson said a larger and Bouncing confidence around since arriving jn N Hollywood W Ex-Sen. Guffey Of Pennsylvania Succumbs at 88 Washington Former on Wednesday-r Khrush- chev has given the impres- sion that he feels he is mak- ing headway in the war of ,ble song and dance nerves on par-1amazing acro- Little Jimmy Van Hook, rests in his father's arms after being found Friday in a woodland near Longview, Wash. The child spent a chilly night alone in the woods. At the right is the boy's mother, Mrs. J. J. Van Hook. but under the supervision of b- c-ty equipment, elder seamen, at the time sak, An Outagamie county tanker was m collision with plow wm be loaned to the the liner Constitution. to n the remaining strcets. The youth, Carl Hennk, Driving conditions remain Hoff, who gave his age as (hazardous f h r o u g h out the "actually testified yes- area Accord Sought In Nyasaland British Hope to Find Natives Ready For Negotiations BY LYNN HEINZERLING Blantyre, Nyasaland Mother and 2 Children In Explosion and Home on Outskirts of LaCrosse Destroyed; Snow Hampers Firemen Apparent- La Crosse ly snug in their fire The cause snowbound Of the blast was not known. North Hollywood, Calif. -Wl With 36 African dead in 8 n Frid afternoon' ?ons' Stone. 85, whose nim-! straight days of rioting, Brit-i we home, a young mother and' The charred bodies of Mrs her two small sons decided to'Lorame Bernd, 26, and her figsten Olsen, was on the star- terday in the coast guard in- quiry of the collision last Sun- day in dense fog about five miles outside the entrance to New York harbor. Hoff said he had been as- signed to steer the tanker by magnetic compass about 41 minutes before the accident. The crash sliced off the tank- er's bow, and a hole was gouged in the liner's hull. No one was hurt. Skipper Present With the boy was the ves- sel's skipper, Ca-pt. Anders Lovlad who was studying the radarscope. The third officer, acts andiish administrators of this pro- tectorate today sought out na- ticularly Berlin. Next Move Awaited Basically, the Soviet posi- batics delight- e d musical comedy audi- Sen. Joseph F. Guffey of Penn- hajf a Democratic stal-itones wart during! Yesterday he told a the New Deal of foreign businessmen tion has not the ences for dec- 64-year-old Russian premier js dead, speaking in twoi Tne veteran I of 50 years on group 'stage and ,screen cumbed s u c- yes- t his home to a ,ments. A Stone and died in bed wnen an ex_ Michael, 4, and Randy, were found on a bed in an plosion and fire swept _ the upstairs room and a or the story board wing of the bridge. Snow drifts stalled a 30-car Chicago and Northwestern freight train just south of Clintonville Friday afternoon. Appleton Mayor Clarence Mitchell today called Mil- waukee and got the loan of a rotary plow and four 4-wheel drive trucks with v-blades to clear the high drifts on some city streets. Some streets have not been opened because the drifts are too high, Mitch- ell said, equipment, The with Milwaukee operators, will be in Appleton this eve- ning. The city also has borrowed heavier equipment from the Concerning the youth of the! county for use tonight, Mitch- wheelman, a Norwegian ship- Foster Resigns tive leaders willing to nego- tiate a peace. Gov. Sir Robert Armitage told newsmen he felt negotia- tions for the territory's future could be carried out with Africans outside the influence of fiery nationalist Dr. Hast- AS WlSCORSin ings Banda. The jailing of Banda and DaSKGtbdll COdCrl other leaders of the banned) African national congress this :k sparked a racial uproar among the 3 million natives who largely share Banda's feeling for an end of white half frame home, lo-iP'ng federation Neighbors said they heardicat'd i" the town of Shelby said: the explosion and "soon the on the outsklrts of La Crosse- ,nnkcsman spoKesman ell said. _, train.was broken into 15- There is nothmg unusual car sectlons and hauled to Fire trucks were hampered1 m assigning a boy who London Tne engine and in reaching the scene by up completed apprenticeship in a caboose headed south for Osh- to 22 inches of snow that clog-j training school ship to any ged roads in the area during job the master thinks him ca- era, died last lieve there will be no war. night of a Today he leaves for East heart ailment Berlin with indications he at the age of may be about to set another 88. diplomatic time-bomb. G u f f e y, a East German was soon power m Penn- Premier Otto Grotewohl saidilowed b? iola? sylvania poll- last night that it was "very! Stones sight had been fail- tics for dec- possible" Polish communist, ing for five or six years, the ades, had Wladyslaw Gomulka and'delayed effect of injuries suf- ed in Washington since losing the Czech preMdcnt and party'fcred in a 1927 plane crash. some African leaders! his senate seat in the 1946 Re- boss. Antonin Novotny, would! He was flying solo between ht bg wjninK H _ publican landslide. COIlfer with Khrushchev in his Connecticut farm and re- land to remajn jn the federa. He died a few hours after be- Berlin. hearsals for a Broadway show ijm wlth Nortncrn and South. This morning, he crashed. a storm Thursday and Fri- pable of doing under supervi- boose day. A township fire truck sion of elder seamen." was the first to arrive and kosh, but found the way block- ed by another engine and ca- then help was asked from the SflOf department1 Guffey Hope For Arbitration Colonial offlclals wcre hope. Madison (Pi Harold "Bud" Foster, closing; out 25 years as head basket- ball coach of the Univer- sity of Wisconsin with the Badgers' worst And Captured by y Officials La Crosse fire which sent four pieces of, equipment. i A single lane was Plowedi through the streets to the way for trucks carrying Trentoni Ga. Alaba- water to the blaze. desperado William E. season were buried under the snow, smothers was shot down and stalled near Larson since Thursday. The New' Lon- don unit freed the second train. A southbound train from Green Bay to Manitowoc stuck between Maribel and Francis Creek. It was re- Turn to Page 12, Col. 1 taken to Doctors hospital yesterday afternoon. Rela-j said he had been having heart trouble for the last two ecks. Guffey, who made politics both a hobby and a career, never married. He is survived by one sister, Mrs. Emma Guf- fey Miller, and four nephews. Born near Pittsburgh on Dec. 29, 1870, Guffey began his rise to political prominence in 1912 when he broke with his uncle. Col. J. M. Guffey, veter- an Pennsylvania Democratic leader, young Guffey backed his former Princeton universi- ty professor, Woodrow Wilson, for the presidency. Army Review Board Sets Sentence Aside army board of review has overruled the court martial conviction of A young lieutenant who was accused of mistreating re- cruits at Kort Jackson, S. C. The board ordered the dis-1 missal of charges and specifi- cations and set aside the find-, ing of guilty in the case of Lt. Gerald M. Whcatley of Bridge- ton, N. J. A military court at Fort Jackson last Oct. 31 sentenced Wheatloy to a reprimand and fined him for standing by while noncommissioned of- ficers ordered one trainee to shout obscene phrasrs and an- other to jump into a dirty, groase trap I The low board found that tho rvidrnco against Uheatlcy' was insufficient to support the cliargo of maltreatment and nlsn orrtorcrt dismissrd thf> concurrent charge that Ipv hnd hrcn Riiilty of conduct' officer. I ern Rhodesia provided they got concessions. Under the present setup the whites in Southern Rhodesia dominate the feder- ation, which Nyasland was pressured into joining by the i British government in London six years ago. The wave of militant na- tionalism which opened this ,week with stone throwing demonstrations has taken on a .more ominous tone in fight- ing. The Africans are arming themselves with .spears, axes and clubs in challenging the i security forces against a ban on gatherings under the state of emergency. in history, has called it quits. His resignation was announced by the Univer- sity Board of Regents. Foster and his team are in Bloomington, Ind., where Wisconsin meets Indiana to- night to close out its season. The record so far is 3-18, with only one conference victory. The repents said Foster, A Badger star himself in the 1930s, would be retained as a professor of athletics. The mother's body was c.aptured today as he attempt- 1QO found atop those of her sons, cd lo shoot it out Wlth a JQP Hies "IBS indicating she attempted to Georgia sheriff. Tokyo Ichiro Hato- shield them from the flames. Police Chief H. II. Hutch-.yama, 76, crippled former I The husband and father, jngs fencd the crafty, cigar-, prime minister who helped Richard, was at his job at a smoking fugitive with a sing- Crosse printing f i r m ie sinot from his .38 caliber where he is a pressman. Drunken Drivers Since Jan. 1 37. Hugo A. Winkel, 64, route 1, Kiel. (Story on Page A 12) pistol at Hooker road and U. S. Highway 11. Dade County Sheriff Alli- son Blevms and Hutchmgs had surprised the 38-year-old Smothers standing by the road near a railroad cross- ing, the latter related. "He threw his gun in the sheriff's Hutchings said. "I beat him to it." Robert Kennedy Soys Pledges for Brother Aimed to East Probe Beaufy Traps Teenage Girl Bank Robber in Middle of Nevada Desert A Las Vepas, bold, teenage tied off a bus in the middle of the desert, has Milwaukee Robert been charged Kennedy, chief counsel of the With robbing a senate rackets investigating Vegas committee, says some ele- bank of SI.761 ments of both management The FBI said and labor offered him poht- 19 year old (ical support for his brother, Belle Ingrain. Sen. John F. Kennedy (D- bio n d e and in exchange for laying belligerent, is off persons .summoned by the the youngest committee. bank robber Miss InRfam Sen. Kennedy is regarded they've ever had to deal with. rest ore Ja- pan's postwar diplomatic re- lations with the'Soviet Un- ion, died to- day of a heart attack. H a toyama, prime minis- ter th r e e Hatoyama times from December, 1954, to Decem- ber, 1956, died at his Tokyo home before a doctor could arrive after he had suffered, severe chest pains. He had been in poor health since he .suffered a stroke in 195L It left him partially paralyzed and with a slight spcceh impediment. In 1956 he made a sudden trip to Moscow and returned r as a candidate for the Demo- Cprtainly snc-s tnc prettiest era tic presidential nomma- a former banl beautv wres banded her a note demanding Tie took one look and slapped and told the teller she handcuffs on her uith a World war II peace was covered by a gun. The girl shrieked, swore settlement, signed a short "A gorgeous said and battled the deputy all the time later in Tokyo. A formal night club singer Shirley Scott, way as he dragged her out of treaty is still pending, a customer in the bank at the the bus and put her in his pa- llaloyama was considered time. trol car. Olson opened her a firm friend of the west. "White, American female, purse and said he found the champagne blonde, 5 feet 6, with only in ad- extremeiy good said dition. Weatherman Thinking the police broadcast. Can't Hide Beauty Alert detectives found that Miss Ingram, who wore a Of White faster? JMiss Ingram had taken a cab light gray suit and a full, to the bank, had it wait for length coat in thc bank, had! her and then sped in the cab switched to toreador pants to the bus depot. The cabbie and a white fluffy sweater by remembered clearly, because the time she was arrested. A A Girl, identified as Belle Ingram, is shown in custody of Detective Mike Winger, right, and Lt. Ray Cubscr who removed her from a Reno-bound bus near Las Vegas Friday. Police said they found in- her possession shortly after the First Na- tional Bank of Nevada was robbed of by a wom- an who fitted her a former bank she was so pretty. For the bandana covered her blonde tion. teller in Washington, D C' same reason, a ticket seller locks. but she still looked Robert Kennedy told a news a tr.nl of admiring remembered she took a bus to beautiful wirrph.to conference yesterday "the as into a Reno She refused to answer ques- most serious attempt came rlownlown Las Vegas bank The bus was 50 miles out tions. The FBI said papers from management" but added yesterday. So when teller along the lonely desert road m her purse revealed she wa he also had a serious offer Mary Herring, 21, announced to Reno when Deputy Sheriff from Hoanoke, Va had been from labor. HP declined to moments Inter that she had Clark Olson spotted it, flag- a bank teller in Washington, name names and said no mon- been robbed, police had nu- ged it down, and stepped and had apparently ty was offered. .morons descriptions to go by aboard. He went up and down flown to Vegas from the Asked how many offers "A beautiful champagne the aislt looking for "an ex- cast last Thursday. i 'Wpre the committee blonde, really a trpmrly prptty girl Sbf> was arraigned on a IcoiinsH was thp way' Herring When he camp to Miss Tn- charge of bank robbery and Hban [described the girl who hart didn't say a m lieu of bail. I to partly cloudy over the weekend with some chance of snow flur- ries. Warmer temperatures generally, but somewhat colder in the northeast sec- tion Apploton Temperatures for thc 24-hour period endinj? at 9 o'clock High, 27. low, 7 Temperature at 9'30 a m., 12 degrees Northwest wind at 8 miles per hour. Barome- ter 30 00 inches. Sun sets at 5 49 p m., rises Sunday at 6.20 a.m.; moon rises Sunday at am. T INEWSPAPERif   

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