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Appleton Post Crescent: Friday, March 6, 1959 - Page 1

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   Post Crescent, The (Newspaper) - March 6, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                             APPLETON POST CRESCENT VOL. L No. 6 30 A, B APttETON-NEENAH-MENASHA, WIS., FtlDAY, MAtCH 6, 1959 AMOCIATBD WUUE URV19B Price Seven India Angry Over Pakistan PaciWithU.S. Atk 'Immediate Debate In Parliament 10 Inches Snow Hit Fox Cities, i Storm Paralyzes Most of State New Delhi The new U.S.-Pakistan military pact; touched off an uproar today! in the Indian parliament with! communists seeking an im- mediate debate. Prime Minister Nehru still- td the commotion by promis- ing to ask U.S. Ambassador Ellsworth Bunker to clarify what the treaty involves. Nehru said that Bunker told the Indian foreign secretary the agreement covered ag- gression only as defined in the Eisenhower other words, communist aggression gave assurances that it added no new factors to the India-Pakistan disputes. Fears Use of Arms Nehru said he understood the concern of parliament members and would seek fur- ther assurances from Bunker. He had told a press confer- ence earlier today he was still uneasy that Pakistan might use against India American arms furnished it for use only against communism. To bolster the anti-commu- nist Baghdad pact, the Unit- ed States signed mutual de- fense treaties in Ankara, Tur- key, yesterday with Pakistan, Iran and Turkey. The United States pledged to take "such appropriate action, including the use of armed forces, as- may be mutually agreed up- on" in event of aggression against the three Asian pow- ers. Initial reports on the treat- ies did not say that only com- munist aggression was speci- fied, and responsible U.S. sources were not immediately available for comment. Dur- ing the negotiation of the treaties, U.S. diplomats re- portedly were aware of the effect on Indian and other neutralist nations of a blanket pledge, and apparently the clause providing for mutual agreement before action was designed to assure such non- communist nations. 8 Killed in Plane Crash Heavy Rainfall Blamed for Deaths Of Marine Crew One More Snow Storm like this and Joseph Ebben, 109 W. Hancock street, practically everyone else as well, will have trouble heaving the snow to the top Photo of the huge accumulated piles. His sons, Gary and Joel, are back of this shovelful helping their father this morning. Wide Search For Desperado Holds 4 Hostages For Over 12 Hours In Tennessee Flight South Pittsburgh, Twin. Signals From Pioneer IV Lost, U. S. Trackers State Satellite Contact Near End At Miles From Earth Schenectady, N. Y. patrolmen from Pioneer IV, held in the sun's three states converged on this gravitational grasp, was lost to the earth "for all practical purposes" at 10.30 a. m., JCST today, General Electric trackers said. ward a solar orbit that may Berlin Topic As Ike Meets Congress Heads President Prepares For Conferences With Macmillan Washing-ton President Eisenhower conferred with congressional leaders today on the Soviet threat to Berlin and possible western counter moves. He and British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan will begin talks here March 20 on the same critical prob lem. The White House and Mac- imillan's office in London an- nounced jointly that the Brit- iish prime minister and For- j eign Secretary Selwyn Lloyd will arrive here Thursday, March 19, "for informal dis- cussions lasting a few days on the international situation." The discussions will begin Fri- day, March 20. The talks pre- sumably will include a review of Macmillan's recent confer- ences with Soviet Premier Ni- kita Khrushchev. Nixon In Group After the announcement of Macmillan's plans to come here, Eisenhower welcomed] senate and house leaders of both political parties to his of- fice for a discussion of the de- veloping crisis. The Big Four involved in this consultation were Lyn- don Johnson of Texas, Demo- cratic leader of the senate, and Everett Dirksen of Illi- nois, Republican leader; Speaker Sam Rayburn of Tex- as, top Democrat in the house, I Death in Area, Schools Closed Winter seems determined not to leave the Fox Cities this year and proved its point by dumping 10 inches of snow on the area by 10 o'clock this morning. The storm, one of the year's worst, is expected to diminish tonight. Forecast is for clearing and cold weather. One death resulted from the storm Henry F. Knapp, 72, route 2, Hortonville, died of a heart attack after his up truck slid off Highway 76, three miles north of Shioc- ton Thursday afternoon. Knapp, with the help of a passerby, freed the truck, drove another three miles, then slid off the road again. and Charles A. Halleck of In- Cherry Point, N. Eight marines died early to- day when their R4Q Flying Boxcar crashed here in a driving rain storm. One crew- man survived. The big transport was ap- proaching this marine air sta- tion on instruments at am. when it crashed. The survivor was acting Sgt Ralph J. Mauro. Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. R. J. iUauro. Sr., of Hamden, Conn. He was taken to the naval hospi- tal at nearby Camp Lejeune where he was listed in critical condition. claimed by the Russians fonwhile longer. never end. But scientists think radio telescopes will be able toidiana, house Republican chief, track the space probe for a', The president also included Vice President Nixon, Sec. of their Mechta sun satellite! Space experts were espe- Defense Neil McElroy and jcially pleased by the infor-j acting Sec. of State Christian 'Herter in the conference. According to reports which launched last Jan. 2. The Russians said they' mation indicating Pioneer had come across no lethal radia- tracked Mechta miles tion belts beyond the two dis- Trawlers to Be Released Order Issued by Foreign Secretary Of Philippines Manila Foreign Sec. Felixberto Serrano tonight or- dered the immediate release of five Russian trawlers de- tained by the Philippine navy at a small bay on the north- iern tip of Luzon for the last week. Serrano said an investiga- tion of the unannounced visit of the Soviet ships appeared to "satisfactory." He said this meant in effect the Phil- ippines is satisfied with the explanation of the Russians that they stopped to repair an engine breakdown. Boarded by Navy Serrano's order permittee the Soviet vessels to depart at once on their scheduled voy age from the Baltic sea to Vladivostok. have reached officials in a 62-hour period. covered in previous lower- Batteries which have pow- level space shots. Roy Anderson, in charge of ered Pioneer's radio voice] Lovell said this was "a most The newly built Sovic here wjU trawlers dropped anchor urge Eisenhower to reduce his tracking operations at expected to die today negative result" of for a summit meet- General Engineering liule satemte sPeeds to--Pioneer's trip.__________ ing with the Soviet premier. Keith Mrs. Keith Smothers tory here, said that he still j was receiving signals from' the gold-plated sun satellite I but that they were "just a tri state bor- flicker." der area today1 xo information could be ob- after a des- tained from the signals, An- p e r a t e Ala- derson said, bama convict The GE station said it was abandoned the the last in the world to have car in which contact with the Pioneer, at he held four that time approximately persons h o s-, 000 miles from earth, tage for more' Earlier, the space probe than 12 hours, tracking station at Goldstdne, The Tennes- Calif had reported that it I can't take it any Cnapp said and collapsed, his wife told Coroner Ber- nard H. Kemps. Blowing and drifting snow snarled traffic and forced many people to walk to work. Drivers who attempted to ravel on Outagamie county lighways this morning said the county was doing a good job of plowing, but poor visi- bility posed the biggest haz- ard. Schools were closed, but classes were held at Law- rence college where most stu- dents live on campus or with- in walking distance. Few Outages Wisconsin-Michigan Power company reported no signifi- cant outages. The storm battered most of the midwest, especially Iowa, and moved northeast. Two- people died in Iowa when they left a stalled car to walk for help. Transportation in Appletoa was tied up badly. No buses from Fox River Bus lines were operating, but some may be sent afternoon if the situation clears up. One bus was sent out early this morning but returned when the driver couldn't get through. Rough Time Cab companies were having a particularly hard time. Dis- ipatchers were trying to keep week ago at Dirique inlet on as many taxis as possible on the northwest tip of Luzon the streets but many calls island. Philippine navy au- thorities sent out a boarding couldn't be ans'wered. Cabs, too, were getting stuck and at The public information of- hlgnwav patrol said the lost contact at a. m. fice said the names of the (-ar sfolcn" by vVilliam E I New Contact Unlikely dead would be released after s tners m his freedom bid1 The Goldstone station in- notification of ncxt-of-km. 'waR on rural road staiied a special filter in its The plane was returning lhe TenneiSee nver near nere .tracking gear and followed from Norfolk on a training Offic.er_s belicxe Smothers is the space probe for an addi- flight and was making an ap- 'The rol at tional nine minutes, proach on instruments when lpgsi Asked if there was any the tower lost contact with and Gcorgla nighuay cars likelihood of further contact the ship wcre jn lhe area a hllly farm. with Pioneer IV a spokesman The plane struck on a low- and mining secti0n. for the National Aeronautics land area about 200 yards smothers serving ICO years and Space administration said from a mam highway. oil six robbery con- it was unlikely. J viclions, overpowered a pa- He added that since the Antl-TrUSt Case tO itrolman and a trusty convict' probe's battery apparently in a police car south of Birm- had gone dead, it was unhke- ingham yesterday. ly that the Goldstone station "He used a key he made would make any further 'We think that this is IV is gone for- Be Resumed March 16 ChicjiR'O The DuPont- General Motors anti-trust himself to unlock his hand- case was in adiournment to-'cuffs in the back seat of the day until March 16 as the said Patrolman Otto government completed testi- Dees after he was turned mony after nearly ,.Good SjKllai" Received weeks of hearings.__________< In the front. He'got, Earlier a "really good sig- ___ was reported by the Gen- Turn to Page 16, Col. 7 jeral Electric company track- ing station at Schenectady. Deny Recovery Tesf Alley Owners Offer New Service Starting tonight in the Within Discoverer N. Y., from nearly 400 000 miles. That was at a m. Hoy Anderson, head of the Washington The de- operation, estimated the dis- fensc department said today lance, and said that "never the 1.300-pound Discoverer before has any radio signal Post-Crescent, area bowl- satellite never was designed of this type been picked up ing alley proprietors are to be recovered and contains from so far out in space." offering a new service to no recovery experiments. The signals from America's Fox Cities bowlers. In the j The department's advanced sun-bound satellite were pick- classified section under (research projects agency, in ed up earlier at Jordell Bank, Special Notices, Classifi- cation No. 7, you will find charge of the Discoverer pro- England. gram, made that comment on Prof. Bernard Lovell. clirec- an open bowling directory. !a report published by the Mil- tor of the telescope station at This special listing will waukee Journal that the satel- Jordell Bank in England, said include information on lite "contains a recovery ex- the U. S. sun satellite was open bowling what .penment." miles from the earth lanes and what nights they The story by Journal when its signal was picked up are available at local al- Science Writer Harry Pease as it rose above the British leys. All the necessary in- -quoted Dr Homer J. Stewart, horizon at a.m. formation will be readily director of the office of plan- Lovell said Pioneer was available in one place, un- ning and evaluation for the traveling at about miles drr onp heading, for easy national aeronautics and an hour at the time, Check this spr- space administration, as say- The renewed pickup of ra- cial service tonight and ,ing this in an interview at dm signals at that distance tvery night. Chicago yesterday. i surpassed tht tracking mark shovel. party to investigate, and theileast one company was telling vessels were kept under close 'Patrons which businesses were walcn j closed so callers wouldn't be The'trawlers were en route! attempting trips in vain. to Vladivostok to be turned1 Greyhound buses were run- over to the Soviet fishing about two hour late, but islry there on'v one run was canceled The Soviet Union has Thursday night run to diplomatic relations with the Stevens Point and Wausau. Philippines. It asked for bus was kept in the sta- trawlers release of the through its embassy in Wash-1 ington. c The communist press de- J Of nounced the detention of thej trawlers. The ne w s p a p e Komsomolskaya Pravda Ilk- _. ened the incident to the re- O DfilIVCf DOpO New York Five men Trn to Page 16, Col. 1 Using Children cent detention of a Soviet trawler by a U. S radar pick- et vessel off Newfoundland. have been arrested aad ac- TheTrlwler waV suspected "of ,P.used children to de- cutting trans-Atlantic cables. llver for a Uespite the distance from "the cold waters of Newfound- afler a S' month investigation, seized 8 i i j r land to the tropical island of n the two Vesterday in East Harlem. Arraigned before Luzon: .sal? ?e not difficult to u_s_ Commissioner Earle N. hap p e n in g s together. It Blsh th wcre held in to_ nff nnr warned: ors. Put Down Your Slum shovel. Relax a while and dream a dream of a pretty young girl and the first flower of spring. Ann Carr, 16-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Carr, Cincinnati, spotted this crocus, an early growing harbinger of spring. It will happen here, believe it or not. All right, back to the Northwest Plane Hits Down Draft, Plunges Feef Chicago A Chicago- bound Northwest Airlines plane, carrying 76 passen- gers, hit a down draft and went into an unexpected dive as it neared Chicago last night. The sudden drop tossed passengers around the cab- in of the four-engined DC-6B craft. At least 12 persons were injured, most of them slightly. Two stewardesses and one passenger wcre hospitalized. Nine passen- gers were treated for minor injuries when the plane, flight No. 426 from Minne- apolis, landed at Midway airport in a rainstorm. One stewardess, Miss Ev- elyn Lau, 21, of Honolulu was unconscious when she was admitted to the hospi- tal. Later she was revived. Hospital officials said she suffered back injuries. Miss Lau reportedly was knocked unconscious during the dive, about 20 minutes from Mid- way airport. ing March 19. The children involved, said [Assistant U.S. Atty. William M. Tendy, are two girls aged 16 and 11, and a 10-year-old boy. No action has been tak- en against the children, Tendy said He added that eventual- ly they would be arrested ei- ther as juvenile delinquents or material witnesses. Tendy said the children knew what they were handling. JO of Snow; No More fo be So id Wisconsin Snow grad- ually will diminish tonight with colder weather on tht way. High temperatures to- day in the 20's Lows tonight 5 to 15 degrees. Appleton Temperatures for the 24-hour period end- ing at 9 o'clock: High, 29, low. 22. Temperature at 10 o'clock, 25. Northeast wind at 16 miles per hour. Ten inches of new snow Barom- eter, 29.12 Weather map on page B9 Sun sets at p.m., rises Saturday at 6 22 a.m.; moon rises Saturday at a.m. 4 KWSPAPERl MEWSPAPKJRl   

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